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  1. #1
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    Triad PSI (manuals say different PSI's)

    Wondering what people are running their Fox Triads at. I have a 07 Stumpy Elite and am 220lbs. I am running it at about 200 psi on the pro-pedal. A buddy of mine was running behind me yesterday and said that it was really bobbing up hill and loosing lots of my pedal power because of it.

    1- Isnít pro-pedal supposed to stop this (pedal bob)?
    2- Is the psi that I am running too low?

    I looked in the stumpy manual and it says 210 to 220 lbs should be 215-220 psi. The Fox OEM manual is saying that for 210 to 220 lbs it should be at 190-200 psi. I understand that it is more personal preference however being that it is my first FS I want to be sure that I am feeling and doing what I should in regards to the setup.

    Specialized manual (07 Stumpjumper 120 Page 13)
    http://www.specialized.com/bc/SBCGlo...Name=downloads

    Fox OEM manual
    http://www.foxracingshox.com/fox_tec...007_om_eng.htm

  2. #2
    MTC rep for LPCPCAC
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    The Triade can handle pressures up to nearly 300 lbs pressure. It truly is not a pound for pound setting. Proper set-up is based on sag (the distance the piston recoils when a rider sits on the bike when not riding) and the riderís preference. An ideal set-up is about 20% sag.

    Get dressed in your usual gear (camelback, helmet, etc) and then sit on your bike, being careful not to bounce. Get off and compare how much the piston retracted vs. the maximum compression. It that distance is greater than 20%, add psi. If it is less, let out air. If you take it to a shop that sells Specialized, they may even have a "sag tool" that can measure the correct amount of sag.

    I weigh 195 and I use about 215 - 220 psi to achieve my settings. I use up the whole 1.75 inches of travel in the shock so I know it is not overpressured.

    You can download various manuals for the shocks directly at http://www.foxracingshox.com

  3. #3
    Lurking sounds so dirty
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    Try this

    +1 and would add experimenting with your rebound setting. If your sag is correct and you're still bobbing, try speeding up your rebound. The alternative is to increase the air pressure in the shock (use 5lb increments to fine tune) and then slow down your rebound setting.

    Of course the best advice I can give is to smooth your pedal strokes. Think even pressure around a perfect circle versus mashing the downstroke. A good test is to use the lockout positon on the shock and see if you are still bobbing.
    You'll know it's me when you see me at Calaveras carrying my 12" Kabar.

  4. #4
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    Rebound extreme not progressive

    Thanks for the updates.

    So I increased the preasure and it made a difference and also played with the rebound. I know that the rebound is to be progressive however it seems all or nothing at the two extremes. I have read about this on the Triad but wanted to know if others are getting this as well. I have not had a chance to test this on the trail (raining for 1.5 weeks) but was messing around in the driveway and street.

    Thoughts?

  5. #5
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    I have 07 SJ FSR Comp and have not figured out the right air pressure balance yet. If I set the sag to 25% at 7/16", the shock only compresses about 1 1/8" during a ride. That is 5/8" of an inch shy of it total stroke, which is 1 3/4". Note; at 25% sag, I set the air pressure at 220 psi, which matches my weight (220 pounds) and the psi the Specialized manual recommends. Set at 200 psi the shock compresses about 1 1/2" during a ride and bobs like mad in pro-pedal mode.

  6. #6
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    I've had similar results to bwalton. Same bike, 2007 Stumpy Comp. I weight about 145 in biking season. I experimented with pressures and damping, ultimately dropping PSI down to 135. I achieve more travel on any given trail, but the bike feels sluggish.

    Instead, on a recent ride, weighing 150 in the Wintertime, I set PSI to 145 - so more air pressure. Bike felt a lot more snappy going in and out of downhill/uphill. Sure, I didn't achieve near the same amount of travel, but if the bike rides great at this setting, maybe I shouldn't focus so much on that?

    The ride was Hall Ranch, which is very rocky, and you would think would exercise (near) full travel. No big drops but lots of hits at speed.

    At some point I'll replace the shock with a better one, maybe when it needs to be serviced I'll make that decision.

  7. #7
    17j
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    My opinion is that if the sag is set correct - you are very close. You may or may not use all of the travel depending on style - trail and how hard on the bike you are. I for example tend to ride primarily light trail or xc and do not bottom, but I also know how to be "light" on the bike and that seems to help.
    If you don't bottom 1/2 the season you can start to decrease pressure by 5lbs to maximize travel, but if you are set up so you bottom on light xc it probably will feel a bit slugish.

    No pressure works for one weight- consider style - trail and how plush vs responsive you want it. Suspension is a game of trade -offs.

  8. #8
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    The 05 Triad on my old 04 SJ responds completely differently then the 07 Triad. For example, the 05 Triad (with its large air cylinder) bottoms out no matter how much air pressure I put in it. As a side effect, the 05 Triad is a lot more plush then the 07 and therefore does not respond as well to pedal input.

  9. #9
    Lurking sounds so dirty
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    Quote Originally Posted by 17j
    My opinion is that if the sag is set correct - you are very close. You may or may not use all of the travel depending on style - trail and how hard on the bike you are. I for example tend to ride primarily light trail or xc and do not bottom, but I also know how to be "light" on the bike and that seems to help.
    If you don't bottom 1/2 the season you can start to decrease pressure by 5lbs to maximize travel, but if you are set up so you bottom on light xc it probably will feel a bit slugish.

    No pressure works for one weight- consider style - trail and how plush vs responsive you want it. Suspension is a game of trade -offs.
    I second everything above, there are many variables to consider and the only way to dial the shock in is to adjust one setting a time - start with recommended pressure and neutral rebound (centered) and in the propedal position. The rebound truly is all or nothing at the extremes and you have to find the desired balance between the two.

    I ride primarily XC and technical type trails. I run my pressure a little softer than recommended resulting in about 30% sag. I also switch A LOT from propedal to open between big climbs and descents and lockout whenever climbing a long fire road.
    You'll know it's me when you see me at Calaveras carrying my 12" Kabar.

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