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Thread: Stumpjumper Evo

  1. #1
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    Stumpjumper Evo

    I'm currently trying to decide what to get as my first bike. I've been wanting to get into the sport for a long time now, and I finally have the means to. I'm looking to get a versatile bike that I can learn and progress on. I want a bike that is fun to ride and capable of both climbing and descending. Something that can be ridden aggressively at times and that I can play around on. From what I've read the Stumpy Evo is that bike, and I'm considering it as well as the Enduro.

    I'm about 6'2 200lbs so I think I'll need a large. I'm curious if at my weight the bike will be prone to bottoming out or anything else like that? From what I've read, it has a proprietary shock mount and there are no aftermarket options. Is this true for even similar shocks like the RP23 w/ Boost Valve? I'll be replacing the shock right away. I want something with stiffer stanchions, but since the bike comes with a 20mm is my only Fox option the 36s? Would a 36 160 be a good fit for the bike?

    The Evo Comp is $3200 locally, and my budget can be $4000 or so. Is there any other components I should consider changing right away?


    Thanks a bunch. I appreciate any comments/answers.

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    At 6'3 and 215 I can honestly say that a 36 is going to be massive overkill for a bike like that. I have a 2012 Evo expert carbon with the fox 32 on it and the fork is fine for ALMOST anything with the exception of really rough trails where I notice a bit of flex. But also, consider that this will be your first bike and you probably won't notice a whole heck of a lot as you're learning to ride. I've been riding for a pretty long time and tend to be pretty abusive to my stuff and the 32 is just fine for about 85% of my riding.

    If you were to upgrade to a stiffer fork (which will also be heavier) I'd look at a Fox 34 or a X-Fusion slant. Personally I'd lean towards the slant at this point in time as I believe it'll be right around the same weight but is more adjustable and doesn't have the finicky CTD cartridge that Fox is doing now. But If I were you I'd save that money for other things on that bike if you were to buy it (I'm guessing it's the comp alloy evo). A wheel upgrade is probably the best upgrade you can do,, then convert to tubeless, then I'd get a new cassette. You'll drop a lot of rotational weight off your bike and will be able to climb faster, descend more confidently (upgraded wheels are usually lighter and stiffer) and have more traction.
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    Where do you ride? Enduro would probably fit the bill, or Stumpy Evo, both very capable. Have you looked at each at the store? You'll notice that the Enduro is just a burlier bike with bigger frame tubes and slightly bigger stanchions (Fox 34 vs RS Revelation 32's). I find that once you get riding, the bikes seem to get a lot smaller than how they looked on the store floor.

    I went through something like this last year when I decided to get back into mtb after about 10 years away. I started with a new '11 Stumpjumper FSR Comp. But it took a handfull of mountain rides to find out that it was just too light a bike (I'm 5'10" - medium frame, 203lbs and my ideal ride is an earn your turns, pedal up, downhill track). So after about 6 months of ownership I managed to sell it and pick up an '11 SX Trail for just about even $. I'm very happy now.
    2011 SX Trail.

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    Yup, I believe SJ EVO has proprietary shock length 194x51mm. I wouldn't worry about the RP23, at 200lbs you should be fine. Worse comes to worse ride for a season, then send the shock to PUSH or Fox for a custom tune as your first service.

    I've heard the Revelation is way stiffer than comparable Fox 32's and most reports here are very positive. If you want to upgrade, you can always go Fox 34 which comes on the Expert line. I upgraded my 2012 SJ Evo Expert from the Fox Float 32 to the Fox Float 34 and have been very happy. There's a lively debate if you do some searching regarding a 36mm on the SJ. Some have it and love it, though most seem to agree with his dudeness that 36mm is over kill....unnecessary weight gain, too slack HA, and increased BB height.

    IMO, I'd say you'll be pretty damn happy with stock build on Comp line. If you had to upgrade anything that's not a wear item, I'd first look to wheels then to fork.

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    Re: Stumpjumper Evo

    I don't understand why with no experience, and without having ridden the bike yet you think you need to upgrade the fork. I think if you want to spend some money on upgrades, you would be much better served getting yourself a decent set of wheels. At 200lb I don't think you are that heavy that you will notice considerable flex in the fork.

    You are right about the propriety shock mount, the only option to swap out the shock is to get one from specialized, but again don't know you would want or need to do this. The stock shock is more than adequate.

    Start with the wheels, that is an upgrade that you will notice and that will bring better performance to your bike.

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    Im about 190lbs and by far the best upgrade for any bike is a stout wheelset and brakes. The new stumpys are way stiffer than the previous years. The only debacle I see is just deciding on what frame size & the dreaded debate on getting a 26er or 29er stumpy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by his dudeness View Post
    At 6'3 and 215 I can honestly say that a 36 is going to be massive overkill for a bike like that. I have a 2012 Evo expert carbon with the fox 32 on it and the fork is fine for ALMOST anything with the exception of really rough trails where I notice a bit of flex. But also, consider that this will be your first bike and you probably won't notice a whole heck of a lot as you're learning to ride. I've been riding for a pretty long time and tend to be pretty abusive to my stuff and the 32 is just fine for about 85% of my riding.

    If you were to upgrade to a stiffer fork (which will also be heavier) I'd look at a Fox 34 or a X-Fusion slant. Personally I'd lean towards the slant at this point in time as I believe it'll be right around the same weight but is more adjustable and doesn't have the finicky CTD cartridge that Fox is doing now. But If I were you I'd save that money for other things on that bike if you were to buy it (I'm guessing it's the comp alloy evo). A wheel upgrade is probably the best upgrade you can do,, then convert to tubeless, then I'd get a new cassette. You'll drop a lot of rotational weight off your bike and will be able to climb faster, descend more confidently (upgraded wheels are usually lighter and stiffer) and have more traction.
    Thanks. I've read a lot about wheels being a good upgrade on most complete bikes. I just have need to look more into what specific wheels are good options. Any recommendations? Also, whats the process for converting to tubeless?

    Quote Originally Posted by Natban View Post
    Where do you ride? Enduro would probably fit the bill, or Stumpy Evo, both very capable. Have you looked at each at the store? You'll notice that the Enduro is just a burlier bike with bigger frame tubes and slightly bigger stanchions (Fox 34 vs RS Revelation 32's). I find that once you get riding, the bikes seem to get a lot smaller than how they looked on the store floor.

    I went through something like this last year when I decided to get back into mtb after about 10 years away. I started with a new '11 Stumpjumper FSR Comp. But it took a handfull of mountain rides to find out that it was just too light a bike (I'm 5'10" - medium frame, 203lbs and my ideal ride is an earn your turns, pedal up, downhill track). So after about 6 months of ownership I managed to sell it and pick up an '11 SX Trail for just about even $. I'm very happy now.
    I live in Utah. There are quite a variety of trails here. Lots of singletrack with climbs and decents, lift access trails, desert trails, some more aggressive FR and DH stuff too. I haven't yet, but on Friday I'm going to a big Specialized store to check them out.

    Thanks for the input.

    Quote Originally Posted by ebeer View Post
    Yup, I believe SJ EVO has proprietary shock length 194x51mm. I wouldn't worry about the RP23, at 200lbs you should be fine. Worse comes to worse ride for a season, then send the shock to PUSH or Fox for a custom tune as your first service.

    I've heard the Revelation is way stiffer than comparable Fox 32's and most reports here are very positive. If you want to upgrade, you can always go Fox 34 which comes on the Expert line. I upgraded my 2012 SJ Evo Expert from the Fox Float 32 to the Fox Float 34 and have been very happy. There's a lively debate if you do some searching regarding a 36mm on the SJ. Some have it and love it, though most seem to agree with his dudeness that 36mm is over kill....unnecessary weight gain, too slack HA, and increased BB height.

    IMO, I'd say you'll be pretty damn happy with stock build on Comp line. If you had to upgrade anything that's not a wear item, I'd first look to wheels then to fork.
    Thanks. I've heard a bit about Push. In layman's terms what exactly do they do to a shock?

    Quote Originally Posted by Finksta View Post
    I don't understand why with no experience, and without having ridden the bike yet you think you need to upgrade the fork. I think if you want to spend some money on upgrades, you would be much better served getting yourself a decent set of wheels. At 200lb I don't think you are that heavy that you will notice considerable flex in the fork.

    You are right about the propriety shock mount, the only option to swap out the shock is to get one from specialized, but again don't know you would want or need to do this. The stock shock is more than adequate.

    Start with the wheels, that is an upgrade that you will notice and that will bring better performance to your bike.

    Sent from my GT-I9100 using Tapatalk 2
    You're right, I really have no reason to change the fork right away. I just heard that 32s flex and figured a different fork might be a good upgrade. Thanks for the input. Any recommendations for wheels?

    Although I don't have any real mtb experience other than just riding my brother's Cannondale a bit, I do have a lot of experience and saddletime with offroad motorcycles. I know they're very different and I shouldn't expect to be great on a mountainbike right off the bat, but I do think that some things might transfer over and help me progress. I really am interested in making sure I learn the basic fundamentals though. I guess I'm just kinda getting caught up in the gear/bike side of it as well. Can ya blame me? Haha.

    Quote Originally Posted by stumpynerd View Post
    Im about 190lbs and by far the best upgrade for any bike is a stout wheelset and brakes. The new stumpys are way stiffer than the previous years. The only debacle I see is just deciding on what frame size & the dreaded debate on getting a 26er or 29er stumpy.
    Ahh yes, brakes are another thing that seem to be worth the money. I havent read anything that particularly good or bad with the Avid 5s.

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    I run Hope disk brakes, by far the best system out there and way easy to bleed/maintain similar to dirt bike brakes.

    As for wheelsets Im in that debate right now. I have had good luck with American Classic & DT Swiss in the past. I am currently considering Industry Nine or the new Syntace MX Wheels. Syntace has a 10 year warranty plus there super wide, light, and very reliable.

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    Fork flex really only comes into play when you start to go fast or are hitting decent sized drops. Otherwise, run what you brung!

    P

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    You say you are new to Mtb and that you have a range of trails available.
    Some of these will only suit specific bikes and whilst you may get away with the odd ride into different classifications you won't be doing your bike any favours in the long run.
    Equally if you over spec the bike to cope with say FR/Downhill and then decide this isn't your thing your stuck with something you may not enjoy.

    Before you buy can I suggest you try each discipline on various hire bikes if you can and then decide which you prefer and then look at which bike suits and gives you the most leeway.
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    Re: Stumpjumper Evo

    Yeah, I hear you mate, upgrading your bike is fun. If you really want to make some improvements, I would start with the wheels and brakes. I can't stand Avid brakes, probably a personal thing, but there's plenty who will agree with me.

    For the wheels, something like a stans flow on hope hubs you can't go wrong with. They're relatively cheap, strong, light and very reliable. For the brakes I would go with Shimano XT with ice tech rotors, also fairly cheap and, in my opinion, one if the best brake sets out there.

    These aren't really blingy upgrades, but are ones which will make noticeable improvements to your ride compared to the fork and shock upgrades. They'll cost a lot less too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.P View Post
    Fork flex really only comes into play when you start to go fast or are hitting decent sized drops. Otherwise, run what you brung!

    P
    Thats good to hear. I don't plan on doing any drops or anything in the first season. Just getting use to the bike and learning the fundamentals. I'll worry about the fork after that. Thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by Finksta View Post
    Yeah, I hear you mate, upgrading your bike is fun. If you really want to make some improvements, I would start with the wheels and brakes. I can't stand Avid brakes, probably a personal thing, but there's plenty who will agree with me.

    For the wheels, something like a stans flow on hope hubs you can't go wrong with. They're relatively cheap, strong, light and very reliable. For the brakes I would go with Shimano XT with ice tech rotors, also fairly cheap and, in my opinion, one if the best brake sets out there.

    These aren't really blingy upgrades, but are ones which will make noticeable improvements to your ride compared to the fork and shock upgrades. They'll cost a lot less too.

    Sent from my GT-I9100 using Tapatalk 2
    Thanks for the recommendations. I was looking at those Stans/Hope wheels on CRC and I think I'll order them when I get the bike. And possibly the brakes too.

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    I recommend a fox 34 mm you will notice flex at that weight. I weigh 194 geared up and on the rocky intense terrain here in colorado it was a no brainer up grade. Brakes i recommend shimano xt or xtr trail brakes. I run the xtr and blow all other brakes ive used out of the water. Bike is epic period. One thing that helped me dial in the rear end was the fox air volume spacers. At yours and my weight realm it helps stiffen up the mid stroke and makes the bike epic off 6 ft or bigger drops. Just my experiences and recommendations, its all up to you. Oh go 1x10 or get the xx1 group its epic on this bike and its what should come with it as its a 25 pound 6 inch beast of a bike.

    Jonesy

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    Quote Originally Posted by yboc View Post
    Thanks. I've read a lot about wheels being a good upgrade on most complete bikes. I just have need to look more into what specific wheels are good options. Any recommendations? Also, whats the process for converting to tubeless?


    I live in Utah. There are quite a variety of trails here. Lots of singletrack with climbs and decents, lift access trails, desert trails, some more aggressive FR and DH stuff too. I haven't yet, but on Friday I'm going to a big Specialized store to check them out.

    Thanks for the input.



    Thanks. I've heard a bit about Push. In layman's terms what exactly do they do to a shock?




    You're right, I really have no reason to change the fork right away. I just heard that 32s flex and figured a different fork might be a good upgrade. Thanks for the input. Any recommendations for wheels?

    Although I don't have any real mtb experience other than just riding my brother's Cannondale a bit, I do have a lot of experience and saddletime with offroad motorcycles. I know they're very different and I shouldn't expect to be great on a mountainbike right off the bat, but I do think that some things might transfer over and help me progress. I really am interested in making sure I learn the basic fundamentals though. I guess I'm just kinda getting caught up in the gear/bike side of it as well. Can ya blame me? Haha.



    Ahh yes, brakes are another thing that seem to be worth the money. I havent read anything that particularly good or bad with the Avid 5s.
    Yboc- I would recommend the Specialized Roval Traverse AL wheels. The hub mechanisms are fantastic for engagement and the rims are tough enough for most anything up to extreme dh runs. Weight wise they'll probably save you about 300-400 grams over the stock wheels. Another wheelset to consider is the Easton Haven. They'll be right around the same weight but a tad more burly. Tubeless conversions are relatively easy and both of those wheels are compatible. A shop would probably charge you about $15-20 per wheel to do it.

    If you are planning for that I'd urge the Enduro over the Stumpy. The Stumpy evo is definitely a very capable bike but I think for what you might want to do an Enduro would be a bit more forgiving and grin inducing. Think of the Stumpy evo as an xc trailbike on steroids and the enduro as a mini downhill bike that climbs very well.

    And Push will essentially open up and custom valve your shock for you to optimize it for you, your riding style, and the frame you have. They do a great job of it, but it can be pricey and it does void the warranty on the shock. Since you're new to this I would strongly recommend against you doing this. Wait a while till you gain the experience of riding your bike and finding out HOW you want a shock to perform before you go and send it to PUSH. It can be a very personal experience.
    The arsonist has oddly shaped feet!

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    Quote Originally Posted by yboc View Post
    Thats good to hear. I don't plan on doing any drops or anything in the first season. Just getting use to the bike and learning the fundamentals. I'll worry about the fork after that. Thanks.
    If you're not planning any drops then you're looking at the wrong bike IMHO. Not sure how steep your hills are there, but a regular stumpjumper FSR will be easier to climb on than an EVO, and is a bit lighter. If you are going to be more into bombing the downhills (which you might be, given your moto background), then go with the EVO.

    I wouldn't upgrade anything straight away. Ride the bike for a couple of months and you'll figure out what you do or don't like, and only then start considering upgrades. Upgrades that just save a few grams are a waste of money IMHO, rather spend money on better performance, better reliability or better fit. You'll only know what those upgrades are going to be after you've spent some time with your bike.

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    Quote Originally Posted by his dudeness View Post
    Yboc- I would recommend the Specialized Roval Traverse AL wheels. The hub mechanisms are fantastic for engagement and the rims are tough enough for most anything up to extreme dh runs. Weight wise they'll probably save you about 300-400 grams over the stock wheels. Another wheelset to consider is the Easton Haven. They'll be right around the same weight but a tad more burly. Tubeless conversions are relatively easy and both of those wheels are compatible. A shop would probably charge you about $15-20 per wheel to do it.

    If you are planning for that I'd urge the Enduro over the Stumpy. The Stumpy evo is definitely a very capable bike but I think for what you might want to do an Enduro would be a bit more forgiving and grin inducing. Think of the Stumpy evo as an xc trailbike on steroids and the enduro as a mini downhill bike that climbs very well.

    And Push will essentially open up and custom valve your shock for you to optimize it for you, your riding style, and the frame you have. They do a great job of it, but it can be pricey and it does void the warranty on the shock. Since you're new to this I would strongly recommend against you doing this. Wait a while till you gain the experience of riding your bike and finding out HOW you want a shock to perform before you go and send it to PUSH. It can be a very personal experience.
    Thanks for the help man, I really appreciate it.

    I can't seem to find the Traverse AL wheels on their site unless it's these?

    If tubeless is that easy then I'll definitely do that.

    For months now I have been planning on getting the Enduro, but only recently have I considered the Evo. Chances are I'll get the Enduro though just because like you said it's a bit more capable on the descents and thats something I will want.

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    Quote Originally Posted by midbunchlurker View Post
    If you're not planning any drops then you're looking at the wrong bike IMHO. Not sure how steep your hills are there, but a regular stumpjumper FSR will be easier to climb on than an EVO, and is a bit lighter. If you are going to be more into bombing the downhills (which you might be, given your moto background), then go with the EVO.

    I wouldn't upgrade anything straight away. Ride the bike for a couple of months and you'll figure out what you do or don't like, and only then start considering upgrades. Upgrades that just save a few grams are a waste of money IMHO, rather spend money on better performance, better reliability or better fit. You'll only know what those upgrades are going to be after you've spent some time with your bike.
    Thanks.

    I do plan on doing jumps and drops, just not right away. I want to familiarize myself with the bike and build my skills before I care about them.

    And after making this thread, I think that's exactly what I'm going to do. Upgrade things as I need to, and upgrade based on tangible benefits. I will probably get wheels shortly after the bike though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by yboc View Post
    Thanks.

    I do plan on doing jumps and drops, just not right away. I want to familiarize myself with the bike and build my skills before I care about them.

    And after making this thread, I think that's exactly what I'm going to do. Upgrade things as I need to, and upgrade based on tangible benefits. I will probably get wheels shortly after the bike though.
    One word of wisdom, demo (not parking lot testing). Make sure you demo the enduro and stumpy evo or even the stumpy comp before you drop several g's. Just my advice, its free and you wont regret your final decision. Stumpy evo test review: Stumpjumper EVO Head to Head Test - Mountain Bike Reviews, News, Photo and Video

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    Quote Originally Posted by his dudeness View Post
    If you are planning for that I'd urge the Enduro over the Stumpy. The Stumpy evo is definitely a very capable bike but I think for what you might want to do an Enduro would be a bit more forgiving and grin inducing. Think of the Stumpy evo as an xc trailbike on steroids and the enduro as a mini downhill bike that climbs very well.
    +1, this is great advice.

    yboc, if you are coming from a moto background, your skills are probably already there and will ramp up fast. The Enduro will feel moto like on the downs.

    P

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    The stock wheels come tubeless ready out of the box with tubeless rim strip pre-installed. You'll get a pair of tubeless valves with the bike...pop them in, add stans sealant, inflate, done. It's as simple as that. The shop you buy the bike from might even be willing to do this for you either for free, or for a discounted rate since you're buying a bike from them.

    I'll echo what these guys said. Get the bike and spend some time on it before you upgrade anything. You'll very quickly determine what you may or may not want to change on it. Personally I don't mind the stock wheels on my Stumpy Comp. They suit my purposes just fine and it's just not in my budget to drop a few hundred bucks on weight savings. If my wheels were trashed that would be one thing, but I can't justify upgrading them for the hell of it.

    I've noticed a lot of people on here saying they have issues with the Elixir 5s. I've had my Stumpy since October and the Elixir 5s still work just fine. I have no issues with them squealing or anything like that. Then again, I tend to be meticulous with bike maintenance and keeping things clean.

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    Been riding xc, "all mountain", and gravity consistently since 2002. I'm 210 lbs and had a rp23 on my big bike (Turner high line) and trail bike (Knolly Endorphin) with no issues. Been riding the Fox 36 fork line exclusivley for about 3 years. No complaints.

    I just sold the two bikes I mentioned and paid for a 2013 stumpy evo comp. I have no concerns with the shock. Did a bunch of research on the fork and feel confident (albeit without riding it). A very fast and hard riding friend put the revelation on his new Endorphin and loves it.

    My 2 cents....the 2013 evo comp is a super solid build. Don't upgrade anything til it wears out or you just want to spend more money. But right off the bat the factory build is money. It's not bling but it's tubeless ready, stiff, horst link (proven), reasonably light, and is getting rave reviews. For a first bike the evo or standard stumpy will be killer.
    Taking it easy for all you sinners.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stumpynerd View Post
    One word of wisdom, demo (not parking lot testing). Make sure you demo the enduro and stumpy evo or even the stumpy comp before you drop several g's. Just my advice, its free and you wont regret your final decision. Stumpy evo test review: Stumpjumper EVO Head to Head Test - Mountain Bike Reviews, News, Photo and Video
    Yeah, I'm definitely planning on finding somewhere that demos the bikes. Thanks for the link.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.P View Post
    +1, this is great advice.

    yboc, if you are coming from a moto background, your skills are probably already there and will ramp up fast. The Enduro will feel moto like on the downs.

    P
    Good to hear. I'm leaning towards the Enduro again, but I think I'll stay open to the Evo until I ride both of them.

    Quote Originally Posted by owensjs View Post
    The stock wheels come tubeless ready out of the box with tubeless rim strip pre-installed. You'll get a pair of tubeless valves with the bike...pop them in, add stans sealant, inflate, done. It's as simple as that. The shop you buy the bike from might even be willing to do this for you either for free, or for a discounted rate since you're buying a bike from them.

    I'll echo what these guys said. Get the bike and spend some time on it before you upgrade anything. You'll very quickly determine what you may or may not want to change on it. Personally I don't mind the stock wheels on my Stumpy Comp. They suit my purposes just fine and it's just not in my budget to drop a few hundred bucks on weight savings. If my wheels were trashed that would be one thing, but I can't justify upgrading them for the hell of it.

    I've noticed a lot of people on here saying they have issues with the Elixir 5s. I've had my Stumpy since October and the Elixir 5s still work just fine. I have no issues with them squealing or anything like that. Then again, I tend to be meticulous with bike maintenance and keeping things clean.
    Oh wow, thanks for that. If it's that easy then I'll for sure swap to tubeless.

    I really have no idea what makes good brakes. What sort of issues can they have?

    Quote Originally Posted by jubilee View Post
    Been riding xc, "all mountain", and gravity consistently since 2002. I'm 210 lbs and had a rp23 on my big bike (Turner high line) and trail bike (Knolly Endorphin) with no issues. Been riding the Fox 36 fork line exclusivley for about 3 years. No complaints.

    I just sold the two bikes I mentioned and paid for a 2013 stumpy evo comp. I have no concerns with the shock. Did a bunch of research on the fork and feel confident (albeit without riding it). A very fast and hard riding friend put the revelation on his new Endorphin and loves it.

    My 2 cents....the 2013 evo comp is a super solid build. Don't upgrade anything til it wears out or you just want to spend more money. But right off the bat the factory build is money. It's not bling but it's tubeless ready, stiff, horst link (proven), reasonably light, and is getting rave reviews. For a first bike the evo or standard stumpy will be killer.
    Thanks. Good to hear what someone at a similar weight thinks of the bike. What size do you have?

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    Quote Originally Posted by yboc View Post
    Thanks. Good to hear what someone at a similar weight thinks of the bike. What size do you have?
    I ordered a large 26". Apparently supply is getting scarce. Won't arrive til mid-March. I parking lot tested a medium and it felt a touch cramped. The large felt great with a 50mm stem. I'm a smidge over 5'10", 31" inseam, longish torso.

    Hope this helps!

    BTW, the stumpy fsr's development has been refined and tweaked since 1993. Say what you want about the "big" bike companies, but Specialized's R&D dep't alone is bigger than most bike companies on the whole. They also work with Maclaren F1. I know this is unrelated to your questions but these things helped me make the switch from 'boutique' bike brands to spesh.
    Taking it easy for all you sinners.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
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    Feb 2013
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    Alright so we see it's a great bike for an average sized adult. But how would the Stupmy Evo 29 HT hold up to a BMF Clydesdale (6'5" 350#)? Should I paper build this or should I move on to something like the Santa Cruz Chameleon? Thanks in advanced for any advice.

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