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  1. #1
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    Specialized HardRock resto project

    hello all

    just picked this HardRock as the base of a resto project:




    yes, in case you were wondering, that is in fact heavenly sunlight® shinning down on this beauty

    so the plan is to fix all the gremlins (and there are many starting with the completely stuck seat post set to fit someone 4' 3" and lower) and to build it into a light trail / grocery getter.

    anybody know how to date these? i'd like to figure out what model year i've got. thanks

  2. #2
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    I have been itch'n to get my hands on an old stumpjumper for a resto....maybe this winter to keep busy.

    Best of luck

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    I have been itch'n to get my hands on an old stumpjumper for a resto....maybe this winter to keep busy.

    Best of luck
    i would have gone stumpjumper if i could have found one too.. these old rigs are so underrated and under appreciated. eveything these days seems to be the latest and greatest but these oldies can still get around.

  4. #4
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    That bike is pre-1994, but I think post-1990 if my memory serves me right.
    I am going through my 1994 FS model right now and the frame has several differences. Also, I think they went to grip shift in 1993 (maybe sooner?) for the hardrock models.
    I've had my '94 since new and recently switched from grip shift to rapid fire. Next up is addressing the "suspension" fork.
    I love the way these '90s specialized rigs ride.

  5. #5
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    Sorry to hijack, but nobody has commented in a week...
    OK, This thread and a friend riding my Hard Rock FS over the weekend has peeked my interest in doing SOMETHING with my own bike.
    I know its old and heavy and has lower end components. To me though, it reminds me of being 14 and being able to go anywhere. It took a summer of mowing lawns and being underpaid to watch some rugrats on Friday nights.
    Since 1994, I've had 3 notable issues: the shifter grips fell apart (replaced with rapid fires); the seat post recall when it was new; and the "shocks".
    I'd really like to replace the front fork, I just don't know what to put on that won't cost more than the bike cost new. Any ideas?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by oifla View Post
    hello all
    anybody know how to date these? i'd like to figure out what model year i've got. thanks
    My first MTB was a HardRock. Oh the good times Different color ( a teal blue/green) but same font and logo placement. The group looks the same too. It was bought new in 1988 or 89. I bet if you pulled the serial number and e mailed Spesh someone may be able to help you out.
    Enjoy every ride!

  7. #7
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    so I have an ol' hard rock too I've been trying to date. got it back when I was in college ('98-'01). any other way to date these? other than listing serial #s? mines got a low end susp fork and V-brakes. chrome color way and (I think) shimano shifters.

    to the OP, good luck with your resto! I'd like to see some pics during the process!

  8. #8
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    Very cool i love the old bikes.

  9. #9
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    Norcal, it kinda sounds like you have one from 1999 or 2000. My roomate bought 2 of them when we were in the dorms...

  10. #10
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    Looked around a awhile for a old Stumpjumper to build a retro Klunker for my wife. Never could find anything for a good price in decent condition. So I settled for this. I have a Demo, SX 4x, and a P2 but this is still my favorite build. I'll find a vintage Stumpy one day and do the same.


  11. #11
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    ^What kind of bike is that?
    2013 Specialized P 26 AM green/purple. Nuff said

    Giant Faith

  12. #12
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    The frame is made by a company called NYC Bikes or something. Paid $50 for the frame shipped in raw aluminum. Had it powder coated and had to re-tap the BB because of some excess weld build up. It was basically one of the only frames that looked like a retro "Klunker" that would except some modern MTB parts (1 1/8 headtube, Euro BB, and 135mm rear wheel spacing). I wanted to put disk brakes on it so I put a modified Woodman brake adapter on it. It was just a fun project bike. My wife didn't get into MTBing, so it gave me an excuse to build a Klunker. Like I said, I'll do a Stumpy someday but the older frames have 1' headtubes. Makes finding a decent fork hard.

    Like the springer forks also
    Klunkerz: Mountain Bike History - YouTube

  13. #13
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    I went on a 12 mile ride last night on the old Hardrock. It brought back some good memories.
    It also brought me to reality of what this bike is... Its a spare/guest bike. While fully functional, it is heavy, and could probably benefit from a new crank and rebuilding the Duotrack fork. And some less agressive tires than the Shockmasters on it.

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