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  1. #1
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    Hope Specialized “Bad” and Specialized “Good”……

    [SIZE="4"]The “Bad”[/SIZE] - My Specialized 2007 Enduro SL Pro……..

    I have just gone through the rigmarole once again of cleaning my 07 SL Pro in order to take it back to bike shop into the New Year with yet more front & rear suspension problems (have already had new shock and fork cartridges previously fitted and regardless of this, the quality of suspension has never been anything like acceptable in terms of either performance or robustness)

    Despite adjusting & tweeking every aspect of the shock & forks, currently the bike handles like a trampoline at the back and feels dead at the front......In fact, any suspension available at all at the front-end for normal trail riding (ie, anything other than really big hits) is provided entirely by my arms & body, which feel like I've been operating a road-repairer's pneumatic drill after about 8 miles riding

    The owner-experience of this bike thus-far has been very under-whelming indeed and I have little confidence in Specialized having the capacity to improve this situation as a result of this forthcoming trip to the bike shop……..Clearly the evidence is surmountable in the undisputable fact Enduro SL, Specialized own-brand front & rear suspension components are fundamentally flawed


    [SIZE="4"]The “Good”[/SIZE] – The Specialized brand, heavy-duty quality inner-tubes installed on my Continental Speed King 2.3-shod Ellsworth Joker……..

    For reasons explained above, my 2007 Enduro SL Pro didn’t cut the mustard for use over the Christmas & New Year period for winter trail mud & rocks. So it was up to my trusty Ellsworth Joker to do the business; it might be a few years old and heavy, but still currently out-plays in almost every respect my example of an Enduro SL, which I bought as replacement!! .........

    Anyway, I run the Ellsworth with Continental Speed King 2.3 tyres, which are light-weight and super fast (ideal tyres for achieving fast pace across the mixed terrain of the UK’s coastal South Downs, which are literally on my door-step). I have Specialized-branded heavy-duty inner tubes installed to front & rear wheels; much to my friends’ puzzlement (ie, “Why do you run with lightweight, super-fast tyres, yet don’t bother with lightweight tubes or even consider going tubeless?”) ………

    The aim of the today’s ride was a 65 mile solo trip to wear off some of the Christmas indulgences, encompassing the South Downs Way, starting from & returning to my house and involving seasonal mud and buttery wet chalk & sharp flint

    Just my luck; having just begun headed on the homeward return, I catch a sharp rock on the sidewall of the rear tyre, which developed into the significant rent shown in the photographs with about 30 miles of said terrain over which to get back home

    Would you believe it (probably not!); the Specialized inner tube held out, despite wheel-spin, thorns, sharp rock and hard-pack conditions throughout!!!.......In fact, I only had cause to add a bit of air in order to replace that which had displaced in the bulge through the sidewall rent

    Now say I; [SIZE="3"]THAT[/SIZE]’s why I always run heavy duty inner tubes, be they Specialized, Continental or Michelin versions and certainly;

    "On this occasion Sir, as I am not a rider accustomed to carrying a spare tyre when out on the trails; [SIZE="3"]YES[/SIZE], I am pleased that I had not opted for a tubeless option
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    Last edited by Lipps64; 01-03-2008 at 02:20 AM.

  2. #2
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    Bummer how the Enduro SL is working out for you, but I feel the same way about the fork. I have tried a couple, and immediately give them back to the owners. I haven't even had much of a ride with it because the fork just doesn't seem to work like my Fox TALAS 32 over the rocks that matter to me (really, anything under 6" which we have thousands of scattered all over). It just seemed like this fork could be more sensitive, but maybe it will get better over time.

    As for the rear shock, I know of 2 that have blown their rebound. I know of a 3rd that broke, but I can't remember if it was also the rebound or something else.
    1997 Specialized Stumpy Pro
    1998 Specialized Allez Epic
    2007 Specialized Stumpy FSR Elite
    2010 Specialized Roubaix Expert

  3. #3
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    [SIZE=2]I think I am right in saying that 2007 is the 1st after 6 years of the Specialized Enduro getting 10/10 that it has only got a 7/10 in the UK mbr mag mostly because of the rubbish Specialized suspension.

    I have had a similar experience with my 07 Stumpy Comp, not because of the suspension but its been in various dealers over the year because of the S**T Specialized put stock on the bike, within 8 weeks of me having the bike both hubs and shifters, rear derailleur, chain and brakes all needed to be replaced.

    It was like you left to my old bike a 2002 Rocky Mountain Slayer to do the hard work, also like you over the north and south Downs in the UK.

    Am I right in thinking you got the Joker from Freeborn in Horsham? I live outside Horsham nr Slinfold.

    Specialized customer service is one of the worst I have ever seen, they don’t believe you, they then actually start arguing with you and finally try to pass you over to Sram customer service, Sram is nicer but equally unhelpful.

    All I can say is I’m glad I started with a GT I-drive cos they just don’t have customer service.
    [/SIZE]

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lipps64
    "Today Sir, as I am not one of those riders accustomed to carrying spare tyres around with me when out on the trails; [SIZE=5]NO[/SIZE], I am pleased that I am not one to have taken the tubeless option
    As someone who swears by tubeless (although I do carry an emergency tube...which is usually borrowed by a friend with regular tires), we don't get the rips in the sidewall at the rim contact point. I am on my second year on my Fire XC Pro's without a flat. The only catch is you MUST use Stans NoTubes.

    Don't mean to be pointing out the obvious, but perhaps it would be a good idea to do a quick inspection of your tires once in a while before riding...

  5. #5
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    Lipps64,
    Agree with your bad.

    See reply on: 2008 S-Works Stumpjumper rear shock?

  6. #6
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    Listen! Stan’s No Tubes stop tyre sidewalls from being torn by sharp rocks???? Really? Hmmmm…

    Hi Spongedog

    I wasn’t really making any point aimed at raising the well exhausted debate about which is best(?), tubeless or non-tubeless(?). This of course, is purely down to personal preference (I myself have a set of UST wheels, which I have ran tubeless when I’ve been looking for extra grip on loose hill sections and the likes, as well as having sets of traditional bead rims, which I tend to stick to running with tubes). These personal preferences are borne out among scores of amateur riders, right up to the pinnacle of professional team riders, whereby, throughout that personal choice remains split. Therefore, “which is better(?)” remains a non-argument really (ie, horses for courses and individual trail condition related criteria dominated selection)

    The only point that I was making in the thread was that I was very pleased with the performance of the Specialized heavy duty specification inner tubes, which got me home in-tact against the odds and clearly; had I had a similar predicament with of torn tyre whilst running tubeless, I would have had to carefully orchestrate installing a tube without possibly incurring further damage to the already torn tyre (ie, the point being, “Lady Luck was on my side on this occasion”; whereas any other day, I’d have been phoning for a lift home)

    As a point of interest though, which you might want to take on board; the tear in the tyre sidewall was caused by a sharp flint rock (clearly explained in my description), as commonly found throughout much of the South Downs Way (the rent in the tyre occurred immediately evident, upon my making an unintended impact on the rock); so to suggest that this resulting tyre damage could possibly have been avoided by inspecting my tyres more diligently before setting off on the ride baffles me almost as much as your insinuation therefore, that the said-same sharp-edged rock would not have torn a tyre employed within a Stan’s No Tube system?????

    [SIZE="4"]P.L.E.A.S.E….. Lets be serious about this for a moment?!!![/SIZE]

    Erm, as good as Stan’s No Tube system undeniably is, when compared to other competitors’ tubeless options. The actual primary advantage (and therefore, the predominant market derived for Stan’s No Tube system, as clearly defined by Stan’s No Tubes themselves [see link]) is the fact that it takes advantage of offering the purchaser a system that can be applied to [SIZE="4"]standard wheels [/SIZE](ie, non-UST) and [SIZE="4"]standard lightweight tyres [/SIZE](thus offering an advantage of saving money and weight when compared to bespoke tubeless-specific rim & tyre combo systems);

    http://www.notubes.com/tubeless_abou...807e8803642bf9

    So, had I used Stan’s No Tubes kit with the standard wheel rims and standard specification tyres, as promoted to do-so by Stan’s themselves; then sharp flint rocks capable of causing similar magnitude of damage exemplified in my photo would no longer have been able to tear the sidewalls of the standard tyres???......

    You seem to be suggesting a claim that Stan’s themselves certainly don’t make for their own product(?)……I’d be interested to hear on what basis you are substantiating this claim?
    Last edited by Lipps64; 01-03-2008 at 02:10 AM.

  7. #7
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    Smile EGF168............Possibly passed you in the dirt!!

    Hi EGF168

    Yes, I’m relatively just down the trail from you; I’m based at Henfield, backing onto the Downs Link. I pass your neck of the woods often when taking a relatively flat blast or en-route to wherever

    You are correct in your assumption regarding the Freeborn connection with my Ellsworth (again, handy[‘ish] for riding the bike in to the shop for servicing or repairs via the Downs Link from Henfield [and catching a bus or lift home!])

    Freeborn is similarly where I picked up the 2007 Enduro SL Pro from last year and to be honest, so far I have had mixed feelings regarding their enthusiasm towards engaging Specialized in rectifying the inherent problems with the bike

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lipps64
    Hi EGF168
    Freeborn is similarly where I picked up the 2007 Enduro SL Pro from last year and to be honest, so far I have had mixed feelings regarding their enthusiasm towards engaging Specialized in rectifying the inherent problems with the bike
    [SIZE=2]
    They weren’t very enthusiastic with my Stumpy problems either so I went elsewhere.

    If you do pass me I will be on either the old faithful Rocky Mountain or my Stumpy or my Trance X.

    Here are my bikes and where I usually ride in the north Downs:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/egf/
    [/SIZE]

  9. #9
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    really troubles with a brand new design? I'm shocked. Thats the price you pay for being an early adaptor.

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