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  1. #1
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    So, how much abuse can a FSR 120 Expert take?

    Right now I have an '05 Stumpy HT Disc (which I love), but I'm really wishing I would have gone with a FS rig instead. Basically, there's a lot more technical terrain in my area than I realized when I bought my bike, and I'm starting to hesitate on stuff for fear of doing damage to my HT.

    I'm 180lbs, and a fairly aggressive rider who does a mix of XC, jumps, drops and even a bit of urban. Can the FSR 120 Expert handle 4' drops, and decent sized jumps? Am I ok with the HT for this type of stuff? I was debating going with the Enduro Comp 130, but the added weight and slacker setup has me hesitating, as I still do a lot of longer XC rides as well. I love how light and quick turning my Stumpy is too!

    Basically, I don't want to make the same mistake and buy a bike that might not be up to the task, especially at these prices. Of course the flip side is that I don't want to have a heavier (the Enduro is what, 30lbs?), less nimble bike if I don't need one. Ideally I'd like to have just one bike, so I'll probably sell the HT.

    Comments or opinions?
    Tarekith.com

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  2. #2
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    The Enduro 130 is a decent all rounder, provided you don't do anything too outrageous it should be okay for both XC and small drops etc. It'll be stronger than either the Stumpy or FSR xc.

    As for weight, my own Enduro 130 weighs in at 29.5Ib with a hardcore xc build bias and am sure I could get the weight down even further if I was obsessive enough. IMHO careful tyre choice makes more of a noticeable difference than shedding the odd pound.

  3. #3
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    Thanks, any idea what it weighed stock, just out of curiousity?
    Tarekith.com

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tarekith
    Thanks, any idea what it weighed stock, just out of curiousity?
    Mine was a low end bike hence the original built up weight of around 32 Ibs.

    I've swapped to a more durable wheelset (Mavic XC717s on Hope Bulbs), a lighter fork (Pace RC40), slightly heavier tyres (Panaracer Cinder 2.25), a Thomson seatpost, cromo SDG Bel Air saddle and Crank Bros Mallet pedals.

    There's nothing especially weight-weenieish going on, with the exception of the carbon Pace fork which is very light for it's strength.

  5. #5
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    I would argue that a hardtail is plenty capable of handling the odd, or even regular, 3'-4' trail drop without buckling under the weight of the rider provided you keep a few things in mind...

    - Doing drops in urban can be harsh as they usually don't involve a landing transition and usually DO involve concrete which is quite hard compared to even hardpack dirt. You can do a great many things on a hardtail (though a stumpjumper I don't know about as it's pretty XC dedicated) provided you learn to ride smoothly.

    - You will go through a set of wheels before going through a frame. Flat spot a wheel? Bend it? Break spokes? Grind up some hub bearings? Probably all things likely to break before the frame. So pay attention to that stuff as it will say a lot about your riding style.

    - All around bikes are nice, everyone wants one that can do everything, but whether or not your local terrain warrants a "quiver of bikes" is up to you. My feeling is that I need one trail hardtail to handle XC rides, maybe some dirt jumping, and light downhill...and I'm saving up for a dedicated "play bike" downhill/freeride full susser to handle all the rougher stuff. It's not cheap, though probably cheaper than trying to XC-ize a trail bike for weight purposes, but you also end up with two bikes that each meet their purposes very well. As opposed to one bike that is a jack of all trades, master of none.
    Last edited by Hot Butter Topping; 08-02-2005 at 11:41 PM.
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  6. #6
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    The urban stuff I do is relatively tame for the most part, no big drops or anything thing to harsh. Thanks for the comments, definitely something to think about!
    Tarekith.com

    '12 RM Slayer70, i9 Torch, Flow EX, XT Brakes, 5050 s3.

  7. #7
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    What's the difference between "All-Mountain" and "All Trail"?
    Tarekith.com

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  8. #8
    RFKA Coldsnap
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    I'm pretty sure "all mountain", "all trail" and "trail bike" are all about the same thing. Though the latter seems to generally be more synonymous with "freeride lite" than the first two. Frankly I don't know to be honest and they seem to be more like a bike-maker designation more than anything.
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  9. #9
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    Thanks, just curious as the FSR is called all trail, and the Enduro is all mountain.
    Tarekith.com

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  10. #10
    Gravity Rides Everything
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    it's not really the right bike for drops and jumps. it's an aggresive XC bike. the enduro would be a better choice I'd say. The enduro 150 especially. I had a 2003 enduro (130) and the rear end of that thing was near bottomless too though. My SJ120 is a bit easier to bottom out. I'm admittedly not the smoothest rider when it comes to airborn stuff, but I do ok. I've had my 120 probably 3 feet off the ground or so.

  11. #11
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    it's not really the right bike for drops and jumps. it's an aggresive XC bike. the enduro would be a better choice I'd say. The enduro 150 especially. I had a 2003 enduro (130) and the rear end of that thing was near bottomless too though. My SJ120 is a bit easier to bottom out. I'm admittedly not the smoothest rider when it comes to airborn stuff, but I do ok. I've had my 120 probably 3 feet off the ground or so.

  12. #12
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    So the SJ120 was bottoming out on 3 foot drops?
    Tarekith.com

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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tarekith
    So the SJ120 was bottoming out on 3 foot drops?
    Hey Tarekith!

    I own an SJ 120 as well. I am not exactly a smooth rider but I do bottom the shock out on a 3 foot drop.


    Given that you are 180 lbs, I would say go with the enduro if you want to do anything over 2-3 feet consistantly. What I find is that if you can do a 3 foot drop on a hardtail, you will probably progress to doing 6 foot drops on an FS. When I bought my bike (a year ago) I thought I was going to do cross-country riding only but I ended enjoying little jumps/drops/stunts quite a bit more. Now, I can handle 4' drops but I am very hesitant to do them for the sake of my bike. I am already looking into buying a freeride machine in the winter.

    So to cut long story short, be careful with what you think you will want to do might change and eventually you might want to go bigger. I think if you have money, I would go with an enduro 150 so there is a lot of room for progression (up to 6 foot drops). I know it's a little heavy but it's not like you are racing. Also, more weight = better shape

    Pedro

  14. #14
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    Thanks man, much appreciated!

    This is all doubly hard as none of the LBS's near me ever carry either of these bikes, so I have to spend close to $2k sight unseen, thus so many questions. You guys are helping a lot though!

    Starting to think it might be best to keep the HT for XC type stuff, and go with the Enduro for the rest of it.
    Tarekith.com

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  15. #15
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    Getting the Enduro and keeping your HT is a great idea. I just bought an 05 Enduro Expert to replace my beat up Rockhopper and the difference is amazing. Climbing really isn't that bad. If it does bother you, just pump up the rear shock a little for the climbs. I climb at the same speed as my friends on HTs (which is about the same as on my Rockhopper), but now I kill them on downhills.

  16. #16
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    Yeah, at this point I'm pretty much decided on getting the '06 Enduro Expert. I figure I'll hang on to the HT for now, and see how well I like the Enduro for everyday riding. If I find the weight to be a bit much for XC stuff, I'll have the HT to ride. If not, then eventually I'll sell the HT and use the money as backup any case anything breaks on the Enduro.

    Thanks for all your help guys, much appreciated!
    Tarekith.com

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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tarekith
    Yeah, at this point I'm pretty much decided on getting the '06 Enduro Expert. I figure I'll hang on to the HT for now, and see how well I like the Enduro for everyday riding. If I find the weight to be a bit much for XC stuff, I'll have the HT to ride. If not, then eventually I'll sell the HT and use the money as backup any case anything breaks on the Enduro.

    Thanks for all your help guys, much appreciated!
    the Enduro 130 is a great bike, a buddy of mine has on and he does very well on it 3 foot drops he does, On DJs this bike is wonderfull and good climber and a great all around bike. but if you are going to do stuff bigger than 6ft in the future i would really get a enduro 150. i own a SXT for freeride and such but it is wonderfull, and is strong. i might get a DHX Air for it because the 5th doesn't feel as nice as i want it to, but i might not get it. ANyways the 06 enduro will be a great bike all around bike, a bit overkill for regular XC but if you do drops and trail and such you would really enjoy the 150 over the 130.

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