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  1. #1
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    Self assembling a SJ out of the box

    G'day everyone.

    I've just acquired a SJ FSR Elite 2011 online from a dealer in the northern part of my country that will ship the bike next week exactly the same way it was delivered to him from Specialized.
    I have all sort of tools ready for the job but it's really the first time I'm doing myself something like this,what should I expect ?? Are derailleurs and cranks just ready to go ?? Brakes ?? Cables and hosing ?? Brake levers already installed on the bar ?? Of course wheels and shocks air are just a piece of cake...

    Regards
    Andrew,Italy.
    '13 Stumpy fsr Elite 29 pimped
    '12 Roubaix Expert pimped for sale
    '15 Tarmac Sworks

  2. #2
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    It's not hard at all. Deraillers and cranks are on, Brakes come pre-bled you may have to run the hoses and cables some bike come with them run and levers already on the bars(I'm not 100% sure with specialized). Overall it's a simple assembly.

  3. #3
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    just u-tube for videos on installing the parts that need assembly.

  4. #4
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    Sounds like you don't really know what you're doing. I'd recommend just getting it built at a shop or at least have somebody check over your work. The bike will come mostly assembled, but you should check everything to make sure it was assembled properly and tight.

  5. #5
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    Specialized upper end bikes come pretty much assembled. As a shop kid, thats all I did for hours was assemble bikes.. the high end bikes are really easy..

    Most for the time the wheels are 100% true and the hubs typically are adjusted correctly, some time they need a slight adjustment.. all you have to do it put the handlebars on and get the cables all in place, adjusts derailleurs, adjust brake alignment, and tighten stem down and its pretty much good to go.. I like the touch every bolt on the bike to double check everything is tight, but they are pretty good most of the time..

    The high end bikes are pretty straight forward to put together because everything is well made.. its the cheap bikes that start to get hard to assemble due to cheaper manufacturing.

    It takes more time to get the packaging off the bike and all taken care of then putting the bike together sometimes.. haha

  6. #6
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    hope you have a torque wrench and a derailleur hangar straightener. If not take it to a shop.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by sixteenstone96
    hope you have a torque wrench and a derailleur hangar straightener. If not take it to a shop.

    I havnt had an issue with hangers on the upper end bikes.. some of the rock hoppers and lower end stuff need it.. but the upper end bikes never seem to need it.. and you dont need a Torque wrench, the only bolts will be the stem and handlebar clamp and a derailluer to put on .. If you have any feel with tools at all then you shouldn't need one. I only bust out the Torque wrench for high end carbon stuff that scares me..

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by swan3609
    ...Most for the time the wheels are 100% true and the hubs typically are adjusted correctly, some time they need a slight adjustment...


    Yeah right...and I'm a chinese jet pilot.

    %100 dished yes, trued and tensioned not so much. But no bikes built in SE asia are that's just the way it goes.

    Be careful, go slow, use a torque wrench on any carbon parts, don't grease anything carbon unless with proper carbon approved compound, and get a shop to check it over and sign off on the build or your warranty may not be valid. I have built bikes professionally on and off for years and will still always get mine QC'd by the shop prior to riding it.

  9. #9
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    Thank you all for he replies,I already own 3 carbon bikes so I'm pretty familiar in using a torque wrench wich of course I already own. I just hope everything will be ok about wheel truing,that would be a pain..
    '13 Stumpy fsr Elite 29 pimped
    '12 Roubaix Expert pimped for sale
    '15 Tarmac Sworks

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by SJDude


    Yeah right...and I'm a chinese jet pilot.

    %100 dished yes, trued and tensioned not so much. But no bikes built in SE asia are that's just the way it goes.

    Be careful, go slow, use a torque wrench on any carbon parts, don't grease anything carbon unless with proper carbon approved compound, and get a shop to check it over and sign off on the build or your warranty may not be valid. I have built bikes professionally on and off for years and will still always get mine QC'd by the shop prior to riding it.

    Ok Maybe I will rephrase that.. Compared to some of the crap that you see on the Lower level bikes, the wheels on the upper end Spech's are cake.. some of the kids mongoose bikes have been really really bad.. But In my limited experience, I haven't ever gotten any upper end specialized bikes were the wheel was really that bad.. Even after taking the bike out and flexing the wheel to bed in the spokes and nipples. never more then a few quick adjustments.. but maybe I just have been lucky..
    but I didn't think About the warranty. It may be a good Idea to drop it off to let them check over your built..

    But in reality, if the OP has dealt with Carbon bikes and has been around bikes at all, assembling shouldn't be that big of a deal..

    Do what you can, and if everything goes good then drop it by the shop and have them check it over and sign off on the built.. and if you get a bunch of it done the right way and the wheels need finishing up, it will still be cheaper then having them completely build the bike for you.. plus I love riding a bike knowing that I am the one who assembled it.. gives me a sense of ownership and self satisfaction.

  11. #11
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    Check out the warranty before you build this bike.

  12. #12
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    I agree with nearmiss24. Sometimes it'll void the warranty if the bike is not built by an authorized Specialized dealer.

  13. #13
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    No big deal. It comes mostly assembled. You just insert the seatpost, install the handlebars, front wheel and front brake, and that's about it. Even the derailleurs are adusted pretty well out of the box -- I just needed to adjust the front one a little bit after the first ride. The only issue I had was getting the front brake caliper adjusted so it didn't drag. The trick of loosening the mounting bolts and squeezing the lever while tightening them didn't work for me. I had to figure out which pad was rubbing and move the caliper that direction until it was right.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Self assembling a SJ out of the box-stumpy%2520in%2520box.jpg  

    Self assembling a SJ out of the box-stumpy%2520full.jpg  


  14. #14
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    Holy sh... it looks scary !! I better put emotions aside when the moment comes and open everything slowly.

    Handlebar cables looks unassbled ,do I hook them up on the frame my self ??

    Great pics,thanks.
    '13 Stumpy fsr Elite 29 pimped
    '12 Roubaix Expert pimped for sale
    '15 Tarmac Sworks

  15. #15
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    Pay the $$$ for someone to do it for you. Better peace of mind AND a warranty to boot.

  16. #16
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    Handlebar cables were all assembled. I think the one exception was the command post controls (if you have a model with the command post). The cable housings were even a good length -- my experience is that most stock bikes have the housings too long and need to be cut, but these were fine. You need to install a few zip ties, but they are included in the box.

    I agree, though, that it's a good idea to get it assembled by a Specialized dealer and get that signed off on your receipt to ensure that your warranty is valid. Especially if you have a model with the Brain, since they sometimes fail.

  17. #17
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    ^^^^^ What he said. If you think that picture is scary, pay to have it done right. The true on the wheels will need to be checked, All derailleur limit screws will need to be adjusted. Cable tension is usally a bit off. The bikes are assembled in asia, shipped to US, and in your case then re-shipped to Italy. Trust me these boxes are not treated with love throughout the process.

    Do you have all the proper tools to tighten BB, hubs, headset? The proper grease and cleaners?

    A shop will do it right, recognize the warranty, and hopefully provide you with some discounted or free adjustments during the break in period.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jabrabu
    You need to install a few zip ties, but they are included in the box.

    a model with the Brain, since they sometimes fail.

    Good to know for the first one,but the 2nd one sounds sooo bad.
    The thing is that the dealer is in the northern Italy and I live on a island off the coast of Rome. I'm in a relatively large town and I could take advantage of a couple of bike shops actually,but I really like the idea to lock myself in the garage for a couple of hours and build up my baby.
    And yes,the bike has the brain....( SJ FSR Elite 2011)

    Well I'm sold,I'll glady drop a few Euro to have it set up by the local bike shop,especially since there may be some BB tightening involved...


    When I actually spoke to the guys at main store and they assured me multiple times that the bike just need handlebar installed and that's it,everything else is ready to go. Not work to take the chance I'm afraid..
    '13 Stumpy fsr Elite 29 pimped
    '12 Roubaix Expert pimped for sale
    '15 Tarmac Sworks

  19. #19
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    Done myself !! Piece of cake !! Thank for the great imputs everyone,it felt like I already knew what to do.
    '13 Stumpy fsr Elite 29 pimped
    '12 Roubaix Expert pimped for sale
    '15 Tarmac Sworks

  20. #20
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    Good stuff, although being that much assembled does seem to take out half the fun

  21. #21
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    Just so you know, if you assemble the bike yourself, Specialized will not warranty the bike should you have any problems in the future.....

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpecEnduro
    Just so you know, if you assemble the bike yourself, Specialized will not warranty the bike should you have any problems in the future.....
    Well,Specialized will not have to know about this . If something goes wrong to the bike I'll just ship it back to the store and they will take care of everything.
    '13 Stumpy fsr Elite 29 pimped
    '12 Roubaix Expert pimped for sale
    '15 Tarmac Sworks

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione
    Done myself !! Piece of cake !! Thank for the great imputs everyone,it felt like I already knew what to do.
    That's great that you got it done, however this scares me:


    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione
    Handlebar cables looks unassbled ,do I hook them up on the frame my self ??

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by jabrabu
    No big deal. It comes mostly assembled. You just insert the seatpost, install the handlebars, front wheel and front brake, and that's about it. Even the derailleurs are adusted pretty well out of the box -- I just needed to adjust the front one a little bit after the first ride. The only issue I had was getting the front brake caliper adjusted so it didn't drag. The trick of loosening the mounting bolts and squeezing the lever while tightening them didn't work for me. I had to figure out which pad was rubbing and move the caliper that direction until it was right.
    Jabrabu, While were also on the topic of wheels in this thread how are your upper-end 29er wheels holding up from Spesh? I know they are spec'd with comp spokes and better rear hub so they should be much more decent than the standard flex-fest 520's w/ the champion spokes? Trying to decide to go Comp or Expert for my stumpy fsr niner. The upper level SRAM crank and drivetrain are worth it but was curious if I can get some good use out of the wheels to save a little money.
    Thanks,
    TJM

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiwi_matt
    That's great that you got it done, however this scares me:
    Why ?? In the pic they looked a complete mess but when the bike came it's been very easy to set them up. The messiest part has been the tubeless conversion.... . It's all set now and wheels/rims stopped leaking.

    Kudos to Specialized for providing a lot of infos about various torque needs and the such,my fancy carbon Lapierre did'nt even had half of those infos,and we're talking about a 6K Euro price tag of a bike........( wich cracked too...... )

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