Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    761

    S Works Stumpjumper HT or FSR

    Could I have some opinions on what I should get as a second bike. It is to have as an alternative to my SW Epic 29er which is the best bike I've ever owned and I will always have one of these as one my bikes. I know that it sounds a bit extravagant but I'm 40 soon and a family member runs a bike shop so I get a good discount.
    I fancy something a bit different and am torn between the S Works HT 29er or the FSR 26er version. I love the big wheels on the Epic but feel that they may not suit a longer travel bike as much, which is why I'm thinking 26er FSR.
    I don't race but like to ride fast and ride XC type stuff, often quite knarly XC.
    Can any of you who ride either, a 2012 SW Stumpy FSR 26er or 2011/12 HT Stumpy S Works give me your thoughts on your bikes. I used to like my 2010 SW Stumpy FSR but could never get that brained fork dialled although I know the forks aren't brained anymore. My son has a 2011 Stumpy FSR but it is a medium and I'm a large but I'm more interested in how the 2012 rides and I know that the carbon rims just complete these bikes.
    I may go with different front fork as well on either. Might go unbrained on the HT to soften everything up a bit as it may be too harsh for me, although the brains F and R on the Epic are just perfect. Probably an unbrained SID world cup.
    On the FSR maybe a Revelation XX World Cup or possibly a FOX but I find they are a bit on the heavy side and currently prefer Rockshox.
    A lot to consider but some honest reviews of what you ride would be much appreciated.
    P

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WR304's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    3,649
    If you didn't like the 2011 Specialized S-Works Stumpjumper FSR 26" much, and replaced it within a year last time, then I don't think there's much point buying the same bike again. The frame geometry is different between the 2011 and 2012 bikes but even so I'm not sure it's worth going to the trouble.

    Specialized Bicycle Components

    Specialized Bicycle Components

    If you get a Specialized S-Works Stumpjumper 29 hardtail are you going to use it? It's not going to be anywhere near as comfortable as a Specialized S-Works Epic 29er. How often did you ride your 2010 Specialized S-Works Stumpjumper 26 hardtail in preference to your full sus before getting rid of it?

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    761
    I did like the 2010 Stumpy FSR but I could never get the fork set up to my satisfaction, that was the problem.
    The problem is that my 2012 Epic 29er is just so good, so you have a point about how much I'd use another.
    I really liked the HT but at the time had to sell it as there were other things that I needed the cash for.
    The carbon wheels just seem to transform these bikes so I would like to hear what people think about the 2012 FSR with them, I know how good the 29er carbon wheels are.
    Maybe I'll have to get that 2013 Epic 29er after all

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WR304's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    3,649
    The other way to deal with wanting a new bike would be to go in the other direction. Get a classic S-Works Stumpjumper dating from the 1990s or early 2000s and take that out on rides from time to time.

    ridevintagemtb: 1992 Specialized S-Works M2 Team - Ned Overend Replica

    It would be enjoyable to ride a different style of bike and also make a nice change from the 2012 S-Works Epic 29er. The 2012 S-Works Epic 29er is good for speed and comfort but one criticism would be that it can make a lot of easier trails unchallenging. Full suspension plus big wheels just tends to roll over everything so going back to an older bike could be fun, making some trails fresh and interesting again.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails S Works Stumpjumper HT or FSR-1992_stumpjumper.jpg  


  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    41
    WR304, you are useless...

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    874
    How do you make easy trails unchallenging? Isn't that redundant?
    MCH Co-Captain

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WR304's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    3,649
    Quote Originally Posted by erichwic View Post
    How do you make easy trails unchallenging? Isn't that redundant?
    Easier (ie. trails that would previously have been of low to moderate difficulty but still take some effort) rather than easy. That's more a comment on my feelings about my 2012 Epic 29er - smooth, fast, comfortable and extremely competent. It's certainly the best mountain bike I've owned, but also strangely "disconnected" from the whole riding experience. It uses technology to overcome the environment and you can almost hear the hours of engineering and design meetings that went into it.

    It's really about considering what would be a good bike to own alongside a 2012 S-Works Epic 29er. The obvious one would be a 2012 or 2013 S-Works Stumpjumper 29 hardtail for maximum wheel and spares compatibility.

    If you've already had many similar bikes in the recent past then something contrasting could be good though. Ever get stuck in a workout and you plateau? Same theory. Another style of bike, whether that's a classic S-Works stumpjumper (or even a fat bike, which isn't Specialized but looks fun) offers variety and a new challenge.

    Pictured below: Riding a fat bike could offer a new outlook on familiar trails.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails S Works Stumpjumper HT or FSR-fat_bike.jpg  


  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GTR2ebike's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    1,881
    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    Easier (ie. trails that would previously have been of low to moderate difficulty but still take some effort) rather than easy. That's more a comment on my feelings about my 2012 Epic 29er - smooth, fast, comfortable and extremely competent. It's certainly the best mountain bike I've owned, but also strangely "disconnected" from the whole riding experience. It uses technology to overcome the environment and you can almost hear the hours of engineering and design meetings that went into it.

    It's really about considering what would be a good bike to own alongside a 2012 S-Works Epic 29er. The obvious one would be a 2012 or 2013 S-Works Stumpjumper 29 hardtail for maximum wheel and spares compatibility.

    If you've already had many similar bikes in the recent past then something contrasting could be good though. Ever get stuck in a workout and you plateau? Same theory. Another style of bike, whether that's a classic S-Works stumpjumper (or even a fat bike, which isn't Specialized but looks fun) offers variety and a new challenge.

    Pictured below: Riding a fat bike could offer a new outlook on familiar trails.
    S-works Epic 29 + S-works Stumpy HT 29 + Fat Bike = Ultimate Stable

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    761
    Not convinced by an old style Stumpjumper or a fat bike if I'm honest but see where you're coming from. The 29er has already given me that 'new type of bike feeling' and I love it.
    Ideal stable for me. S Works Epic 29er + S Works HT 29er + S Works Stumpjumper FSR(probably 26er as I'm not yet convinced on 29 for longer travel bikes, but someone may be able to convince me)
    Those who ride a 29 SW HT please give me your review of the bike as well as those riding a 2012 SW Stumpy FSR 26 or 29.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    227
    The SJ HT 29er is a rocket ship that doesn't beat you to hell as much as the 26er HT. I've had the 26er HT (22 lbs), a 26er Epic (24.5 lbs), and now a 29er HT (22.8 lbs). For the project to work it has to be light.....that's what makes the SJ 29er worthwhile.

    Still, I have ridden my friends Epic 29er (at 25 lbs). That is the finest piece of high tech machinery I've ever been on, bar none. It does, as one writer posted here, take you into fantasyland. The 29er HT brings you back to the trail but in a much more tolerable and sustainable way (for long rides) than the old 26er.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •