Page 1 of 5 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 103
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: terrible's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,828

    New question here. RP23 on a 2009 enduro SL???

    I'm not liking the stock shock on my '09 enduro sl carbon. I was wondering if anyone had swapped out their shock for an rp23. I really liked the shock that was on my titus ftm (rp23) and was thinking it would help out the bottoming I'm getting with the stock shock if I had it tuned by push.
    "I'm the fastest of the slow guys"

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chameleoneel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    540
    Are you buying a new RP23? or (assuming the sizes are the same) are you transferring from the Titus FTM?

    I ask because buying a new shock and then paying to have it tuned is going to be really expensive.

    I just put an Manitou Evolver ISX-6 on my 2007 Enduro SL. Only ridden it once so its not dialed yet but I used some ballpark settings from a thread here and its already a large improvement over the AFR on chatter bumps and it specifically has a volume adjustment to customize ramp up for bottoming, as well as low and high speed compression damping to further customize the shock's action. The Evolver is also known for its mid-stroke support which I can confirm. It rides much higher in its travel than the AFR.


    Check the "Where are the best deals?" section of the forum. A couple of weeks ago I posted a thread there with the deal that I found on the Evolver. The price is still good.

    I'm sure the RP23 is a great shock (never ridden one but it seems well liked). But I figure why pay so much when you can have the adjustments at your own fingertips?

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    790
    Don't forget what makes the Enduro AFR shock and Futurshock fork high performance components, Spike Valve Technology. This is a high speed circuit that gives the bike excellent traction in large hits and rock gardens etc. To maintain small bump sensitivity keep the air sleeve seals cleaned and Greased and use the low speed compression adjust as needed. Slightly decreasing air spring volume will allow bottom out resistance to ramp quicker.
    Visit my profile for Links to:

    Performance Guarantee, Service, Setup, E150 Maintenance....

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: terrible's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,828
    The rp23 was going to be new and then sent to push.
    "I'm the fastest of the slow guys"

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: steve47co1's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    986

    Did it and liked it

    I have a PUSH'ed RP23 on an 09 Enduro SL - huge difference over the AFR. Order it with the Big Hit kit.
    The reason dogs have so many friends is that they wag their tail instead of their tongues.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,967
    A properly set up AFR is better than an RP23 by far, ------you can change the valving in the RP23 and add a big bump stop for bottoming out to the RP23 to help it work ( which is what Push does ) ---this can also limit travel down which I don't like.

    The internal valving and the compression bleed and the spike valve are really way ahead of the RP23 ---------

    You can make any shock work if you know how to re-valve and make changes and or make a new piston and correct design problems that are out of parameters for a rider.

    The AFR is made way better and has alot of room for valving and can be suited to work better .

    As with any bike and shock , ----the set up is everything,--------If you are not keeping your negitive pressure alive , and not keeping the air sleeve lubed ---( which you also have to do on the RP23)

    The AFR will not work correctly -------nor will the RP23 ----,

    You can add a stronger bump stop to the AFR to aid in bottiming out if need be .



    Actually I just talked to Derrin at Push last week , ---and he is doing some AFR work now--( because it is a great shock and is well built ) and tops the fox all the way around

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: darkslide18's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,059
    Talk to TF tuned. They are in England but they tune and service AFR's

    I plan on sending mine in pretty soon. They also do the E150. They can tune it to your liking.

    http://www.tftunedshox.com/default.aspx

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chameleoneel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    540
    Specialized is doing tuning now as well. I just had my E-150 and AFR tuned by them. I'll be making an initial post about it soon and doing follow ups after that as I ride more. I'll of course, need to bolt my AFR back on >_>

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: terrible's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,828
    Can't have the bike down for two weeks while I'm wating on parts. I'd rather just order something, have it show up, and bolt it on.
    "I'm the fastest of the slow guys"

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    614
    I did not know there was negative air in the AFR. Is that adjustable?

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    790
    Negative air is 'Gulped' when sliding the air canister back on the shock body. The amount of negative spring air trapped is good for nearly all but the lightest of riders. There was mass confusion by people trying to 'tune' their negative spring settings, most riders eventually followed what I had originally recommend which is to periodically grease the seals and just thread the air can back on. Unless you are an extremely lightweight rider (135lbs or less) the negative spring air that is gulped will work well for you.
    Visit my profile for Links to:

    Performance Guarantee, Service, Setup, E150 Maintenance....

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    614
    Quote Originally Posted by Speci- Suspension Tech
    Negative air is 'Gulped' when sliding the air canister back on the shock body. The amount of negative spring air trapped is good for nearly all but the lightest of riders. There was mass confusion by people trying to 'tune' their negative spring settings, most riders eventually followed what I had originally recommend which is to periodically grease the seals and just thread the air can back on. Unless you are an extremely lightweight rider (135lbs or less) the negative spring air that is gulped will work well for you.
    is there any documentation for a step by step on how to do that?

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: terrible's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,828
    I'm going to try a few of the things Speci- Suspension Tech has recomended to me first.
    "I'm the fastest of the slow guys"

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,967
    Quote Originally Posted by shift96
    is there any documentation for a step by step on how to do that?
    there are several threads that Speci-Suspension Tech and myself have on here to help guys relise it does take some set up to make anything work correctly.

    I have added a schradder valve to the lower portion of one of my air sleeves so I can easily add and subtract negitive air .

    If you have not taken your air sleeve off you do not have negitive air in the sleeve and the sleeve is dry , ---and the upper bushing is way to tight in the shock body --------these all together will make for a harsh ride and a hard to dial shock .

    this little stuff makes a big difference in performance and feel !!

    Once you start getting your AFR dialed you will be amazed on how well it works

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    790
    If your not confident in releasing the air pressure, unscrewing the air can off, cleaning/greasing the seals and getting it put back together, I highly recommend to have your dealer perform the basic air sleeve maintenance service, this service is recommended at least every 50 ride hours. The annual/150 ride hours full service is required to be performed by an authorized service center.
    Visit my profile for Links to:

    Performance Guarantee, Service, Setup, E150 Maintenance....

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    614
    Quote Originally Posted by Speci- Suspension Tech
    If your not confident in releasing the air pressure, unscrewing the air can off, cleaning/greasing the seals and getting it put back together, I highly recommend to have your dealer perform the basic air sleeve maintenance service, this service is recommended at least every 50 ride hours. The annual/150 ride hours full service is required to be performed by an authorized service center.
    Are you talking about the negative air pressure? I read one of your post's that said you actually reccomend having the negative air pressure. Is this what you reccomend? Thanks

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,967
    Quote Originally Posted by shift96
    Are you talking about the negative air pressure? I read one of your post's that said you actually reccomend having the negative air pressure. Is this what you reccomend? Thanks
    Yes he is -------by taking off you air sleeve and putting it back on all greased up you now a trapped negitive air

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    614
    I thought Speci Tech said that was actually a good thing in their opinion?

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    790
    Having air pressure in the negative spring chamber is a good thing. I do not recommend bleeding the pressure out. The negative spring air pressure is 'gulped' as you slide the air sleeve back on.
    Visit my profile for Links to:

    Performance Guarantee, Service, Setup, E150 Maintenance....

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    614
    Quote Originally Posted by Speci- Suspension Tech
    Having air pressure in the negative spring chamber is a good thing. I do not recommend bleeding the pressure out. The negative spring air pressure is 'gulped' as you slide the air sleeve back on.
    Great. Thank you!

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,967
    Quote Originally Posted by shift96
    I thought Speci Tech said that was actually a good thing in their opinion?
    Yes it can be very good , -----that is what you are doing by taking your air sleeve off and then reinstalling it ---------you are trapping negitive air in the negitive side ,

    when these shocks are built , all of the negitive air is bled out , ----this makes for a great pedaling platform for XC type of riding -------but it adds alot of antisquat right when the shock is topped out and makes the ride harsh ------( not to mention the upper shock eye bushing is real tight and binds the suspension up adding more stiction )

    This is whay I added a schradder valve in my sleeve at the negitive chamber ---------I have actually found I like alot of negitive air ------more negitive air that you can trap by just taking your air sleeve on and off.

    On one of my AFR shocks that I built a different piston for and changed the threshold on where the spike valve opens and how much it flows ------I do not run any negitive air in my negitive side -----I bleed it all out .

    So negitive air is just on area to help tune the ride ,---------getting the bushings to move freely is another area that need to be addressed .

    Finding out what air pressure in the positive side works the best for you can take some time , ---------- then working with different fork tube height changing the HTangle is another ( e-150 forks )---------and of course how the fork is tuned will affect the shock , and the shock will affect the fork --------and then the tires ----( tubeless is the only way to go for feel and lower pressures ) ----------its a whole packedge deal with many peices of the puzzle working together

    So when you get a guy that thinks he is going to buy any old shock and throw it on his bike and think it will be good , ----------he is in for a big suprise
    Last edited by kelstr; 12-02-2009 at 08:36 AM.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: terrible's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,828
    What did you do to the bushings ro make them rotate better? I already lost the special nut on the rocker that holds the bolt on the top of the shock. I did'nt like the way it was binding so I backed it off some and ended up losing it some where on the first ride. Have one on order and plan to either lock tight it or drill and tap the rocker for a set screw on the bolt head.
    "I'm the fastest of the slow guys"

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    790
    We have new style of reducers that we started using on our 09 shocks that have less friction.
    Visit my profile for Links to:

    Performance Guarantee, Service, Setup, E150 Maintenance....

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    614
    Speci Tech, what is the small set screw for on top of the shock near the adjusters?

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,967
    Quote Originally Posted by terrible
    What did you do to the bushings ro make them rotate better? I already lost the special nut on the rocker that holds the bolt on the top of the shock. I did'nt like the way it was binding so I backed it off some and ended up losing it some where on the first ride. Have one on order and plan to either lock tight it or drill and tap the rocker for a set screw on the bolt head.
    ------Dont drill and tap a set screw on the upper rocker -----the bolt has to crush the shock spacers and clamp the sleeve between them so it will be solid and make the sleeve rotate in the shock bushing .
    You can not run the bolt loose because the sleeve will spin on the bolt and tear up the bolt and knock and click and have play and ruin the rocker.

    You push out the upper sleeve and chuck the sleeve in a lathe and polish it down about .0005 thou and get the sleeve where it just pushes nice in the upper bushing in the shock eye .

    Actually on the ones I do here I make a new sleeve out of oil light bronz , and I cut oil groves in the sleeve so it will hold grease , ----I make the sleeve fit just nice and it holds grease and the thing moves so smoothly its just nice -----that way the upper bolt can be tightened to the 140" lbs that it should be .
    I also make a new upper bolt and nut ---------the stock speci bolt and nut are soft and don't work for many removal and installs before they fail ,-----I also cut an 8MM allen socket pocket for the bolt side ------the 6MM can strip easy and i prefer an 8 .

    The oil light bronz is great for this application

    Also when you order that special bols and nut for your upper shock -----you have to buy a bolt kit -----they are like $70 dollars here in the states.

Page 1 of 5 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •