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  1. #3501
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    Speaking of forks, I picked up a reba 120 for my 13' camber comp last year, and decided to do the RCT3 upgrade this winter along with the shimmed rebound assembly w/dig valve. Huge upgrade to the fork IMO. The small/mid bump compliance improved dramatically, and it soaks up big hits with no problem. The fork feels planted to ground, and the extra adjustments have been a welcome addition to fine tuning the ride. If you've been considering it, it's well worth it IMO, the RCT3 is a big upgrade over the stock damper. I would do it again without question after the improvements I've felt.

  2. #3502
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    Getting close to upgrading my fork. I'm definitely sold on RockShox, but could you explain exactly what RCT3 means compared to the base Reba model?

    I'm looking at a 120mm SID or Reba. The Reba seems like you get better bang for the buck but the SID I'm looking at is a RCT3 model and a bit more expensive. I don't mind spending a few extra bucks if I am getting a much superior product.

    Thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by Erock503 View Post
    Speaking of forks, I picked up a reba 120 for my 13' camber comp last year, and decided to do the RCT3 upgrade this winter along with the shimmed rebound assembly w/dig valve. Huge upgrade to the fork IMO. The small/mid bump compliance improved dramatically, and it soaks up big hits with no problem. The fork feels planted to ground, and the extra adjustments have been a welcome addition to fine tuning the ride. If you've been considering it, it's well worth it IMO, the RCT3 is a big upgrade over the stock damper. I would do it again without question after the improvements I've felt.

  3. #3503
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    Not the OP, but I ran a Fast Track on the rear for a while and have now run a Slaughter on the rear for about 150 miles now. The only difference...cornering is much more efficient with the Slaughter. So...I would imagine the Slaughter is much faster then a Ground Control. I'd highly recommend a Slaughter on the rear for any terrain.

    Quote Originally Posted by jester6578 View Post
    How well does the Slaughter roll compared to a Ground Control? Faster or slower? By how much? Thanks!

  4. #3504
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennings6 View Post
    Getting close to upgrading my fork. I'm definitely sold on RockShox, but could you explain exactly what RCT3 means compared to the base Reba model?

    I'm looking at a 120mm SID or Reba. The Reba seems like you get better bang for the buck but the SID I'm looking at is a RCT3 model and a bit more expensive. I don't mind spending a few extra bucks if I am getting a much superior product.

    Thanks.
    This thread will explain a lot, it's a much better design compared to the stock damper.

    Converting Reba RL 29 to RCT3 (solo air, 2014)

  5. #3505
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    Wanted - New / Lightly Used - 2015 Specialized Camber Elite Carbon 29 - Size XL

    Looking for a New / Lightly Used 2015 Specialized Camber Elite Carbon 29 - Size XL; unfortunately Specialized seems to have stopped production, and every bike store I've checked with in Marin seems to be out of stock??

    If anyone knows a store that stocks this model please let me know, thanks!!

  6. #3506
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    Okay for about a 100 bucks more I can get a Pike instead of the Revelation. is there any real gains with the pike in a 120mm. the only reason im thinking of going with the pike is if I upgrade my frame one day to a expert carbon evo.
    2016 Santa Cruz Hightower CC
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  7. #3507
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    Quote Originally Posted by marinmtb View Post
    Looking for a New / Lightly Used 2015 Specialized Camber Elite Carbon 29 - Size XL; unfortunately Specialized seems to have stopped production, and every bike store I've checked with in Marin seems to be out of stock??

    If anyone knows a store that stocks this model please let me know, thanks!!
    Not much time left but here is one on ebay
    2015 Specialized Camber Elite Carbon XL | eBay
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  8. #3508
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    Quote Originally Posted by sml-2727 View Post
    Okay for about a 100 bucks more I can get a Pike instead of the Revelation. is there any real gains with the pike in a 120mm. the only reason im thinking of going with the pike is if I upgrade my frame one day to a expert carbon evo.
    $100?? Please explain where you find that price.
    Last summer when I bought my revelation 450 dollars the cheapest apply to be found even on ebay was way over 700 dollars used 8 or 900 new.

  9. #3509
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trail_Blazer View Post
    $100?? Please explain where you find that price.
    Last summer when I bought my revelation 450 dollars the cheapest apply to be found even on ebay was way over 700 dollars used 8 or 900 new.
    Worldwidecyclery on ebay, they have a make offer tab so I offered something real low and they shot me back with a price of under 750 for the pike and 605 for the rev, so yeah my math is wrong more like 150 more for the pike.
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  10. #3510
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    You should compare the models there are 3 levels of options and they each feature level model get diff prices.

    Regular base model Revelation can be close to $500 while the full featured dual mode Rev is closer to $750.
    The base model Pike is around $700 and full featured unit $100 and up.

    Check SRAM website and sites like Price point to be sure the eBay price is legit for the unit you want.
    Last edited by Trail_Blazer; 05-11-2015 at 07:50 AM.

  11. #3511
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    SML-2727, thank you so much for the heads up, I was able to win that auction and acquire the bike I was looking for!

  12. #3512
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    Quote Originally Posted by marinmtb View Post
    SML-2727, thank you so much for the heads up, I was able to win that auction and acquire the bike I was looking for!
    Thats great man! have fun.
    2016 Santa Cruz Hightower CC
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  13. #3513
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    Official Specialized Camber Thread-img_20150507_172354.jpg

    Just about done. I've added the enve handlebars and saved a few oz's. I rode the Rock-it trail in Southern Cali this weekend, and this bike was a champ!

  14. #3514
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    What all you do to it? What year is it?

  15. #3515
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    Hi all. Bought a camber evo. Pretty new to the bicycle scene. Rode enduro (motorized that is) for many years. I'm a light weight kind of guy and I have some difficulty getting the front wheel off ground, now that I don't have a engine to help me.. I figured a shorter stem could help. The only one my LBS can order is the PRO Athertons 35mm for $140. No web shop in Sweden have it in stock, and frankly I find it a bit expensive (I'll buy it if necessary).

    Do you guys have a tip for a short stem? Or, will the 30mm or so shorter than the standard not make much difference?

    On another note: I love the bike, compared to my old hardtail

    Thanks in advance, and have a nice day.

  16. #3516
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thensome View Post
    Hi all. Bought a camber evo. Pretty new to the bicycle scene. Rode enduro (motorized that is) for many years. I'm a light weight kind of guy and I have some difficulty getting the front wheel off ground, now that I don't have a engine to help me.. I figured a shorter stem could help. The only one my LBS can order is the PRO Athertons 35mm for $140. No web shop in Sweden have it in stock, and frankly I find it a bit expensive (I'll buy it if necessary).

    Do you guys have a tip for a short stem? Or, will the 30mm or so shorter than the standard not make much difference?

    On another note: I love the bike, compared to my old hardtail

    Thanks in advance, and have a nice day.
    30mm shorter stem will make a huge difference in steering, handling and also help with getting the front wheel up. So much so that it might be too big of a jump, especially for $140. Unless you can return it, I would not chance that.

    Without regard to the stem length being right or wrong for you and your riding style, the inability to lift the front might come from timing and experience too. I've ridden bikes too big, too small, with long and short stems and I have always been able to lift and move the front wheel around. I suggest take some time to develop that particular skill before spending your hard earned money. I no way am I trying to offend you or suggest you do not know how to ride, but like anything it might just be this one skill set that needs a little practice, seeing as you are new to cycling.

    PS. You have a great bike to start with and learn.

  17. #3517
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    Quote Originally Posted by bpd131 View Post
    30mm shorter stem will make a huge difference in steering, handling and also help with getting the front wheel up. So much so that it might be too big of a jump, especially for $140. Unless you can return it, I would not chance that.

    Without regard to the stem length being right or wrong for you and your riding style, the inability to lift the front might come from timing and experience too. I've ridden bikes too big, too small, with long and short stems and I have always been able to lift and move the front wheel around. I suggest take some time to develop that particular skill before spending your hard earned money. I no way am I trying to offend you or suggest you do not know how to ride, but like anything it might just be this one skill set that needs a little practice, seeing as you are new to cycling.

    PS. You have a great bike to start with and learn.
    I agree with previous guy. Just give it some time and see if things improve. The shorter stem will make some difference, but you should be able to lift your front regardless of stem length.


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  18. #3518
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    When you try to lift the front wheel, where is your butt positioned?
    is it behind the seat over the rear axle of the tire (floating in the air)...
    The Camber in size Large is usually setup with 90mm stems.

    Watch videos on how to pull and hold a wheelie on a mtb, these full body movements help a lot to make it easier to get the front up and keep it up.
    Last edited by Trail_Blazer; 05-13-2015 at 11:08 PM.

  19. #3519
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trail_Blazer View Post
    When you try to lift the front wheel, where is your butt positioned?
    Thanks for the tips guys. I am as far back as I can. I only weigh 62kg (136.7 pounds), and am 175 cm tall/short. 5 feet 9 inch (maybe, confusing imperial system) I have a medium frame.

  20. #3520
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    If you sit on the bike on level ground and lean back far enough the wheel will lift and if you don't balance yourself you'll fall over backwards. Getting the front end up is all about leverage based on your body position and attitude and balance. Doing 20 pushups a day is all the strength you should need in your arms.
    Basically it's like doing a bunny hop while shifting weight behind your seatpost.
    It can be hard to do if your seat is too high.

  21. #3521
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    It's possible your seat is in the way, or stem too long, making it harder to put your body into the correct leveraging position.

  22. #3522
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    Official Specialized Camber Thread

    Woohoo this showed up today:


  23. #3523
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    Recently got an Evo the same as bk_mtb's with the RS RC 29 fork, the guy in the shop said the compression dial should be either fully open or fully closed, and not to ride it with the dial half way.
    Is it just a straight on/off lock on the compression dial, as it seems to have a 'click' position about 1/3 round?

    (And is it worth replacing the damper with an RCT3 damper like 11.4015.544.270 ?)

    Thanks

  24. #3524
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    Really enjoying my new elite. It's perfect for my local trails and I'm glad I got this over the evo. Lots of tight switchbacks, no drops, and only a few small jumps. I'm amazed at how well it climbs. I usually ride a rigid singlespeed and am used to super efficient climbing, but I almost never feel the need to lock out the shocks. I typically leave the rear in trail mode and the front open. Amazing bike!

    Official Specialized Camber Thread-20150516_102517.jpg

    Official Specialized Camber Thread-20150516_104604.jpg

  25. #3525
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    Any news for Camber 2016? Will we see SWAT-door and brain?

  26. #3526
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    No, the Camber (like the Enduro) will probably not see major changes for the 2016 model year. The Camber was redone more recently than the Stumpy to begin with.

    They do the bike models design changes in staggered years. This follows the same pattern that auto makers established years ago.

    It allows them to focus on each model rather than try to update several at once. It is too demanding on resources to change several at the same time.

    Look for changes in the 2017 or 2018 model year.

  27. #3527
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    Quote Originally Posted by bpd131 View Post
    30mm shorter stem will make a huge difference in steering, handling and also help with getting the front wheel up.
    I went to a 110mm stem with a 10° rise trying to alleviate some pain in my hands. I did manage to get some relief, though it made my steering less precise and I had to learn to adjust. An unexpected side effect was that it made my front end significantly easier get up and over thing.

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  28. #3528
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trail_Blazer View Post
    It's possible your seat is in the way, or stem too long, making it harder to put your body into the correct leveraging position.
    Exactly that's why it's harder for people who aren't so tall. I myself have to yank the handlebar(besides getting my weight back as far as I can) to get the front end up. The chainstays on this bike are too long for "medium and small" riders.

    A shorter stem does help. I changed the stem to a 40mm Renthal Apex.

  29. #3529
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    A trick for those who don't already know (requires a bike with a suspension for):

    When trying to wheelie a hard to lift bike, start by actually compressing (preloading) the fork with the upper body, then apply pedaling power and pop back with the arms and upper body.

    The compression and subsequent rebound from the fork can help get a stubborn bike up a bit more easily.

  30. #3530
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dusty Trails View Post
    I went to a 110mm stem with a 10° rise trying to alleviate some pain in my hands. I did manage to get some relief, though it made my steering less precise and I had to learn to adjust. An unexpected side effect was that it made my front end significantly easier get up and over thing.

    Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
    I had hand pain too - but after getting an Easton EC70 Carbon Riser Handlebar my hand pain is pretty much gone.

  31. #3531
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    Quote Originally Posted by plupp View Post
    Any news for Camber 2016? Will we see SWAT-door and brain?
    If you want a brain get the Epic. The brain is not on the Stumpjumper any longer and I doubt they would put it on the Camber. All models for the 2016 year will be "EVO" but the name will be dropped.

  32. #3532
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    Quote Originally Posted by themtbcat View Post
    If you want a brain get the Epic. The brain is not on the Stumpjumper any longer and I doubt they would put it on the Camber. All models for the 2016 year will be "EVO" but the name will be dropped.
    I'm not looking for Brain on the bike, but some articles about the SJ FSR they mention that Spez thinks of Brain for bikes up to 120mm travel got me thinking they plan to add it to the Camber.

    If they go for Brain or just having the Evo model I think the place for using the Camber as a Marathon or allround XC bike will be lost. Today the regular Camber is a perfect fit if you don't like the Brain on the Epic.

    So for me, I would rather see them continue with keeping the bike with two options, one for more trail use and one you could do XCO/XCM with.

  33. #3533
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    Is there any info on thr 2016 Camber out there? Are all models going evo like the stumpy? I gotta say i really like the new stumpy, i was all ready to build a 2014 rip 9 rdo until i saw the new SJ, now im holding off til i get to demo one. But if the Camber gets some love like the SJ did i might be swayed to stay with the camber.

  34. #3534
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    Quote Originally Posted by sml-2727 View Post
    Is there any info on thr 2016 Camber out there? Are all models going evo like the stumpy? I gotta say i really like the new stumpy, i was all ready to build a 2014 rip 9 rdo until i saw the new SJ, now im holding off til i get to demo one. But if the Camber gets some love like the SJ did i might be swayed to stay with the camber.
    Can't really say I understand what you mean by this..?

    You're saying that if they make evo camber, you would rather have it than a stumpy Evo?

    Well, both of those are models are available and being made so go pick out the color you and specs you want and buy it, pre order it even.

  35. #3535
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    I guess I should clarify a little bit, the new SJ frame has that swat door integrated into the frame, and another thing is, there offering the bike in a comp carbon. The camber never came in a comp carbon evo before only the alu camber evo and the way pricey expert version. Hmmm maybe they will have Epic, Camber with no evo version and SJ since there all evo version and then Enduro.

    Im just looking for that happy medium 130-140mm trail bike in a Carbon frame but with basic specs. Which is pretty much what the SJ Carbon Comp is, so I guess I just answered my question...lol
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  36. #3536
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    Exactly what I thought.

  37. #3537
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    Hi , ive recently bought a camber expert 2012 frame which i have now completed building, im having difficulty finding the correct front derailleur and also when i do find the right one how does the cable go up to the derailleur arm to pull the cable, i know it goes through the little holes in the frame but is there some sort of a cable guide that helps keep it secure and shifting correctly, it seems a little strange just for the end of the cable to go straight to the hole....Please help pas im currently having to ride on the middle chain ring of a 3 x set up !!!!!

  38. #3538
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    Quote Originally Posted by coochicoo75 View Post
    Hi , ive recently bought a camber expert 2012 frame which i have now completed building, im having difficulty finding the correct front derailleur and also when i do find the right one how does the cable go up to the derailleur arm to pull the cable, i know it goes through the little holes in the frame but is there some sort of a cable guide that helps keep it secure and shifting correctly, it seems a little strange just for the end of the cable to go straight to the hole....Please help pas im currently having to ride on the middle chain ring of a 3 x set up !!!!!
    There was a little flexible tube/guide for the derailleur cable on my 2013 frame. Like part solid tube and part rubber "accordion".


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  39. #3539
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    I just finally had a chance to take my new '15 camber evo 29 up to one of my local trails that had been a bit tough. Damn guys this bike climbs like a mountain goat. It is so much better than my '10 stumpy elite it's not even funny. I also climbed some super rocky trails that had been difficult before and this bike just ate the rocks for breakfast.

    I love this bike. Anyone that is on the fence should just do it. Buy this bike and go ride you won't be disappointed.


  40. #3540
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    the FD cable just comes along under the frame and after the last little frame cable clamp thing it just continues down (free) under the bottom bracket and then bends up abruptly to the cable endpoint/mount on underside of FD. Nothing more than what you are seeing. The "little flexible tube/guide" that fefillo mentions I believe is more of a dust cover for the FD cable. Not really necessary in my opinion.

    Be sure to leave adequate slack in the FD, brake, and RD cables running where these go under the bottom bracket. The "slack" kind of looks wrong as these cables (especially the FD due to the bend it has to make) hang down ~1-2 inches under the bottom bracket, however if you don't have adequate slack these cables will rub against underside of bottom bracket when the rear suspension compresses. I tightened them for looks and the FD cable ate into my frame a bit over a couple weeks of riding before I realized!

  41. #3541
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    Has anybody tried the new XTR 9000 side pull FD on their Camber?

    I know 1x seems to be the trend, but I still like the lowest gearing 2x gets me up front. I have a 2014 Camber Comp, and it looks like it can be done by pulling the cable out of the underside of the bottom bracket and then just diverting it with exposed cable from the last (maybe 2nd to last?) frame housing clamp on the downtube and go horizontal in to the side pull clamp on the derailleur.

    Any experiences? And yeah, in 11 years of being here, my first post!

  42. #3542
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    New Evo Camber Comp

    I just can't say it enough - I love this bike. Need to find a good place for a whole day ride, but so far - just love it.

  43. #3543
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    Finally got a good ride on my camber elite. With all the rain lately it's been difficult.
    On the local trail I've ridden my 2 rigid SS 29ers and my 29er hardtail. My best time was around 48 minutes. Without really pushing too hard I was able to take 4 minutes off of that with the camber. It's amazing how efficient it is on the climbs. It's a little stiff on the downhills but I'm still playing with the suspension. Overall I'm extremely happy with the bike and I honestly can't think of anything better suited for my local trails.

    Two complaints with the bike:

    1- I hate the tires. The front pushes in corners and the rear slides a little more than it should on small loose rocks over hardpack. They also don't seem to climb very well. I'm replacing them with Ikons.

    2 - The 3 position dropper post is a horrible design. It's way too difficult to find the middle position. Looks like they fixed this with the newer models though.

  44. #3544
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    Quote Originally Posted by coke View Post

    Two complaints with the bike:

    1- I hate the tires. The front pushes in corners and the rear slides a little more than it should on small loose rocks over hardpack. They also don't seem to climb very well. I'm replacing them with Ikons.

    2 - The 3 position dropper post is a horrible design. It's way too difficult to find the middle position. Looks like they fixed this with the newer models though.
    1- I felt my bike pushed until I let some air out of my front tire. My LBS had put waaaay too much air in.

    2- Agreed. I can only reliably find the high and middle positions. I'm probably going to finally call KS and see if a I can pay a small fee to have my old post fixed.

  45. #3545
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    Just curious of why is so hard to find the middle position on the post? This is my first experience with a dropper post, so hence my question.

    Do you ride the middle position mostly and low for descents and high for only long committed climbs? I was told to ride the high pretty much all the time, but switched to the middle for comfort and flexibility vs the high and liking it much better.


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  46. #3546
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    Quote Originally Posted by csimon View Post
    Just curious of why is so hard to find the middle position on the post? This is my first experience with a dropper post, so hence my question.

    Do you ride the middle position mostly and low for descents and high for only long committed climbs? I was told to ride the high pretty much all the time, but switched to the middle for comfort and flexibility vs the high and liking it much better.


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    The reason why it's so difficult. When you are in the high position and click the dropper you have to push down with your butt. What happens is you go past the middle position and have to kind use your butt to guide it. This for some is nerve racking and I get their complaint. Me I love mine I'm used to it I know exactly how to find the middle and it works. Now I have never had any other dropper so what do I know.

    As far as when to use the dropper that's up to you. I think you should b fully extended 95%+ of the time depending on the trail you are on. The dropper is great when you have a big drop off coming and you need to be clear of the seat. It's great when you are going down steep downhills. There is a section I ride on a particular trail that has a lot of whoops, roots on downhill and drop offs. I go middle position for the entire section.
    I lost my back brake 3 miles into a 9 loop of a trail that was new to me. The dropper was a life saver. On the steep downhills I just dropped the seat down to reduce my center of gravity controlled my speed and nursed it back without even so much as a scary moment.
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  47. #3547
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    It just takes too much time and effort for me to find the middle spot, which is what I like to use when there's a lot of corners and rough sections that benefit from that position by allowing me to corner better but still pedal while seated if needed. My last 2 posts were infinitely adjustable and it took a fraction of the time to switch to a lower post level.

  48. #3548
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    Quote Originally Posted by coke View Post
    It just takes too much time and effort for me to find the middle spot, which is what I like to use when there's a lot of corners and rough sections that benefit from that position by allowing me to corner better but still pedal while seated if needed. My last 2 posts were infinitely adjustable and it took a fraction of the time to switch to a lower post level.
    While I agree that the infinite adjust posts are nice, I'm satisfied with the Command Post enough not to swap it out. I've found it's easier to drop on a moments notice than the Reverb I had (had to get a bit of pressure on the Reverb to get it moving). And I've gotten used to finding the middle position quite easily. Hit the trigger & release it as soon as the post moves. If you are quick enough, it'll just catch - but that's not often. "Ride" the seat down half way, then just stand up. It'll click into place in the "cruiser" setting. I did have to unlearn holding the lever down as if it was an infinite adjust post. Once it's unlocked, you can release the lever and it'll catch in the next position it passes.

    One complaint that I DO have is that I wish the cruiser setting was 1cm higher, or there was one position between the top two. I like having my seat 1-2cm lower on techy, but pedal-y, sections.


    Quote Originally Posted by csimon View Post
    I was told to ride the high pretty much all the time, but switched to the middle for comfort and flexibility vs the high and liking it much better.
    If you find that the high setting is too high, have you tried lowering the post a touch overall? I've had experience in bike fitting and one of the most common fixes I did was to lower the seat height - especially on mountain bikes.

  49. #3549
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    I have my high position set perfect to my power peddling and use the middle position for downhill and technical riding - I use my all the way down posistion for getting on and off my bike. As was already stated - hit your lever from the high position and as it starts to slide down release the lever and slowly let the seat drop into the middle position - it may take a few times but practice makes perfect.

  50. #3550
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    Quote Originally Posted by coke View Post
    1- I hate the tires. The front pushes in corners and the rear slides a little more than it should on small loose rocks over hardpack. They also don't seem to climb very well. I'm replacing them with Ikons.
    Small rocks/gravel/leaves over hardpack is a bit of the GC's achilles heel. They tend to grab the top layer w/o being able to penetrate the hardpack below. I've found that lower pressures (18-20 psi depending on weight) make a huge difference. The are fantastic all-around tires - but a bit sketchy on hardpack.

    That being said, I swapped to a 2.4 Ardent/2.35 Ikon setup on my Expert EVO and they're great. The one downside is that if the GC's slide, they typically catch pretty quickly, but if I push the Ardent/Ikon's to the edge, they go full Tokyo Drift.

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