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  1. #1
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    New FSR expert, rolls slow???

    I just made the jump to suspension!! VERY NICE!!! Heres the ?s? I am comming off a 21 pound moots and this FSR feels like I am dragging a sled behind it... I am hoping it will get better as I ride it more and get used to it. It just doesn't roll like my moots. Bigger tires and heavier wheels I know play some role, but just how much? Is it worth upgrading to some lighter wheels? Any sugestions?

    As for the rough stuff and bumpy single track....... HOLY $HIT!!!!!!!! This is really enjoyable. What a responsive bike! It was down to the Blur Lt and FSR, I felt the FSR was a better value. This blasting down the hill stuff shur is fun!!

  2. #2
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    Speeding Things Up!

    Cruizer,

    With a Stumpjumper FSR base, Comp or Expert, you're looking at a bike that weighs arount 27.75 lbs out of the box (for a Medium size). So, that's somewhere between 6-6.75 lbs more than your 21+ lb HT! The full suspension helps some, but you'll definitely notice a difference just from the weight gain alone.

    The good news is that you can chop a substantial chunk of the weight and get a much better handling and more responsive/quicker bike by chucking the stock tires and wheels. The Adrenaline tires weigh 800 grams each. Just by switching to a good set of 500 gram xc tires, of which there are many, will save 600 grams or about 1 lb 5 oz for the set. That itself will make a noticeable difference and be a cheap upgrade!

    Going a step further, replacing the stock 317 wheelset, which weighs close to 2100 grams, with something in the 1500 - 1700 gram range (FSA 300, Spinergy Xyclone, Mavic Crossmax, American Classic 350, DT Swiss 1504, custom sets...) will drop another 400 - 600 grams. Altogether, that can add up to between 800 - 1200 grams or roughly 1.75 - 2.75 lbs of weight savings just with the wheel and tire swaps. Now you have a bike down to between 25 - 26 lbs, and still so many other parts that can be lightened up down the road. Best of all, the savings are all in rotational weight and weight at the furthest ends of the bike.

    Lighter on the climbs, quicker acceleration, faster and a much lighter feel up and over obstacles!

    I have to wait a few more weeks to do it, but I'll be getting an 06 FSR to replace my Sugar2 that got stolen in March. And, except for that Thomson post I already bought for it, the tires and wheels will be getting swapped out first and immediately. I'll keep the wheels, slap on some slicks and have a road setup. The 317/Adrenaline setup might also be good to use on shuttle pass DH play days?

    Well that was a long post. Hope it helps.

    Ride On!

  3. #3
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    dang i didn't know the 317 wheelset was so heavy. And am I the only one that see the stock 2.00 tires as being really huge for 2.00? I think they are closer to 2.25

  4. #4
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    Agreed: Try new tires.wheels

    First things first: Swap out your tires and tubes. I took my '06 Stumpy Expert out for two or three rides on familiar trails and like you, it felt like I was trying to ride through swampland!

    I put on a pair of my standard XC tires (IRC Mythos XC-K, roughly 540 grams each) and life was peachy. The tires were absolutely stuck to the tubes so I liberally doused talcum powder in there also. I also put on a lighter front wheel but left the rear stock for now. BIG DIFFERENCE!

    When set up properly, the Expert is a very nice pedaling bike. I have owned mine now since Nov '05 and absolutely love it.

    Michael

  5. #5
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    i'm thinking about throwing down some coin on the crossmax sl's and getting some UST tires....hope to bring down some weight

  6. #6
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    Well, that is the trade off. If you want to ride the plush waggon you undoubtedly will have to pull a bit more weight. I demo'd an fsr, but ended up with the blt because I could build it cheaper with components that I had than purchasing a complete fsr. At any rate, the squishy weight is about 35lb and it feels like I have my anchor down sometimes. But the stability in the rough and dh is worth the penalty for me. If I really want to climb fast, I pull out the hardtail. But if I want to have fun the fs is my tool of choice.

    Yes, the adrenalines are big. My ust measures 2.25" across the casing. They are also unusually tall. The tire is about the same height as other manufacturers 2.5" tires. Makes it a bit hard to calibrate a speedometer I bet The tubed versions I have weighed in at just over 700g. The tubeless weighed in at 826g. I am currently running the fastrac 2.0 (500g) converted to tubless on the front of my xc rig and it works surprisingly well. The fastrac is also a legitimate 2.0.

    As stated you can drop some weight on tires and wheels, but IMO this is kind of self defeating on a bike like the fsr unless all you want to do is pure xc and racing. The suspension design and fox fork are fantastic and can take everything up to light dh duty. If you put on really light tires/wheels you will be pinging off of rocks and lose the stability and confidence that the suspension gives you. Instead of holy$hit this is fun plowing down the mountain, the response to dh will be more of a compromise and a test of skill and line picking. Depends what you are into. If you can't get used to the extra weight, try lighter or faster rolling tires first.

  7. #7
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    The stock Adrenaline / Adrenaline Pro tires are comfy but really slooowww.... The Pro version is however quite light, but it still doesn't roll at all.

    Change your tires and tubes to faster rolling ones, like Schwalbe Nobby Nic's with some latex tubes, and you will notice a BIG difference with reasonable costs. Your bike will feel a lot faster.

    Only after then it's reasonable to switch to ligher rims, spokes and hubs. Changing those to lighter versions will cost a lot more but you won't feel it as clearly as switching to lighter tires/tubes.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by torment
    i'm thinking about throwing down some coin on the crossmax sl's and getting some UST tires....hope to bring down some weight
    Going to UST doesn't necessarily save weight at all because UST rims and UST tires are heavier than ordinary ones. If you want to save weight, Get yourself ordinary lightweight rims like Mavic XC717 Disc with lightweight, trusty and easily serviceable hubs like DT240s and ordinary tires, and convert them tubeless with Stan's tubeless kit. The Costmax wheels aren't that light when compared tho similarly priced competitors.

    There's a lot of info on this, just use search...

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by plussa
    Going to UST doesn't necessarily save weight at all because UST rims and UST tires are heavier than ordinary ones. If you want to save weight, Get yourself ordinary lightweight rims like Mavic XC717 Disc with lightweight, trusty and easily serviceable hubs like DT240s and ordinary tires, and convert them tubeless with Stan's tubeless kit. The Costmax wheels aren't that light when compared tho similarly priced competitors.

    There's a lot of info on this, just use search...
    I didn't want to go UST to save weight but to run a lower psi and not have to deal with the stan's stuff. I just want to put on a tire, air it up and ride.

    I like the crossmax because they are easily fixed if someone were to happen. I don't think anything would because I'm 150lbs and mainly do XC. The crossmax are ~500 grams less than the wheels I have now and I really like the way they look. Got to check out a pair the other day and they were indeed sweet but if I were to buy some, they would be off ebay for like ~500.

    I would use the search function if only it worked.

  10. #10
    Specialized Rida
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    Quote Originally Posted by 69cruizer
    I just made the jump to suspension!! VERY NICE!!! Heres the ?s? I am comming off a 21 pound moots and this FSR feels like I am dragging a sled behind it... I am hoping it will get better as I ride it more and get used to it. It just doesn't roll like my moots. Bigger tires and heavier wheels I know play some role, but just how much? Is it worth upgrading to some lighter wheels? Any sugestions?

    As for the rough stuff and bumpy single track....... HOLY $HIT!!!!!!!! This is really enjoyable. What a responsive bike! It was down to the Blur Lt and FSR, I felt the FSR was a better value. This blasting down the hill stuff shur is fun!!
    It's all in the tires. If you have specialized tires get rid of them. They roll extremely slow and feel like your dragging your breaks when you ride.
    On every bike I have owned that has come with specialized tires I would give them a run once and everytime I hate them becuase of how they roll. So what I do with the tires is I take them off and GIVE them away after one ride. That is how much I hate them, but that is just my preference.

    I would recomened some Kenda Nevegals. I run Nevegals on all of my bikes past and present, and will never run anything else.

    Don't upgrade your rims, components, tubes, spokes or anything else. Start with your tires and switch to nevegals first and you will see what I mean. They roll so smooth over everything sand, gravel, deep sand, loose rock, fireroads. It almost rolls like you riding on pavement.

    Give that a shot and see how it works out.

  11. #11
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    This is a great site!!! Thank you for all your thoughts and pointers.

  12. #12
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    rotational weight is something you will notice most. As everyone else has mentioned play with your tire set up to find what you like. Really is the cheapest way to make big differences on your bike. (grip/weight/stability/wear/overall feel)

    If you are keeping the Moots it might be a great idea to have the bikes seperated some. Right tool for the job type of thing.

  13. #13
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    I had some drag on my rear disc, and my hub was tight. Changed the tires to WTB veloci raptors. They are probibly the same weight, but they look smaller and now the bike rolls sweet!!!! Looks like I am hunting for some crossmax sls.... What do they go for? Any suggestions??

  14. #14
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    I run a velociraptor on the rear of my bike (not a stumpy yet, today maybe???) the rotational direction makes a big difference. In the XC directionit rolls really nice but it did not want to grip on roots or rocks when the trail pointed up. I switched it over to the DH direction and it is a little slower but hooks up on everything! Don't have one on the front, but I could see running that in Xc and the rear in DH. They do corner really well in either direction.

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