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  1. #1
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    New 2008 Stumpjumper FSR Comp, What upgrades?

    Hi,

    I recently purchased a 2008 stumpjumper comp fsr. The only purchase I made thus far was a helmet. I would like to know what some good upgrades to this bike would be. I am not looking to upgrade it all it once or go all out changing the suspension right away. Just looking for some upgrades that will shed some weight or increase performance/longevity of bike. I was thinking my first upgrade would be new rims and tires. Any recommendation for for a good set of rims and tires?

    Thanks for your help!

  2. #2
    ride ride ride
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    whysofast?

    just go out and ride it a bit to see what you *feel* ought to be changed.
    in general, if you do anything other than fairly minor changes you should have gotten an elite or expert instead of the comp. anyway, the comp is great. just ride it and figure it out.

    P.s.: yeah, the tires suck. there was a thread not too long ago about good tires ... do a search ...

  3. #3
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    x-9 shifters would be a good upgrade over the x-7's. Price point hase them onsale for 89.99. I just put a wheelset from rbikes.com on and they are great. Hadley hubs with mavic 819 hoops. Good luck.

  4. #4
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    I know in many of the reviews on this site they mention that the tires aren't that great. I really have nothing to base what a good mountain bike tire is since I am coming from a road bike. What makes these tires mediocre? That was probably going to be my first upgrade. Overall, I love the bike, it is so much fun to ride.

  5. #5
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    same bike, my tyres are prone to puncturing on the rear, both from pinch flats and thorns,

    the tyres themselves are not too bad, but not great at cornering, the walls are very thin, they roll pretty fast, fine for me on hardpack and dry single track, they also flick a lot of debris in the air,

    i also find trying to use patches to fix punctures almost always never works, mainly because the tyres are so wide, stretching the inner tubes and patches too much, causing the patches to fail,

    other upgrades i will do as and when other parts fail, i'm not too happy with the brakes overheating often, but this bike is a mid level full suspension bike, the triad shock sort of makes any major upgrades pointless, i would be looking for reliability from any upgrades,

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by amt27
    same bike, my tyres are prone to puncturing on the rear, both from pinch flats and thorns,

    the tyres themselves are not too bad, but not great at cornering, the walls are very thin, they roll pretty fast, fine for me on hardpack and dry single track, they also flick a lot of debris in the air,

    i also find trying to use patches to fix punctures almost always never works, mainly because the tyres are so wide, stretching the inner tubes and patches too much, causing the patches to fail,

    other upgrades i will do as and when other parts fail, i'm not too happy with the brakes overheating often, but this bike is a mid level full suspension bike, the triad shock sort of makes any major upgrades pointless, i would be looking for reliability from any upgrades,
    Funny you say that because I just got a flat yesterday. I think the tube was pinched from a small jump. Would a different set of tires have prevented this? I do notice they do kick up a lot of debris when riding. I really cant comment on the cornering ability since I have nothing to base it on.

  7. #7
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    Comp Upgrade

    I've had mine now for about 3 months. So far the only thing that I would like to upgrade is the shifters (to x9) and the front derailleur. The shifters are ok but the LX derailleur i'm not keen on. Before my Comp I had a HT Stumpjumper that had a full XT groupset which performed great all the time. The LX is not the best performer under all conditions. Unsure if this is because of the sram shifter combo or what. But all said, I will put up with what I've got until something breaks.

  8. #8
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    The sky is the limit

    I purhcased mine in August of 2007. The Comp was the only model out, with the Elite, Expert and Pro due in September. I wouldn't wait any longer.

    Here is what I've upgraded on my '08 Stumpie Comp, with all the wrenching done perosnally;
    Mavic Crosstrails with Kenda Nevegals DTC - GREAT upgrade over stock
    SRAM X.0 rear derailleur, carbon midcage
    Shimano XT 770 front derailleur (E-type. pull the bracket and it is DMD)
    X0 Carbon Trigger shifters w/Jagwire Pro cables
    Shimano M770 Hollowtech II cranks, Candy SL pedals
    Enduro BB with Creamic Bearings, Token 6061 rear derailleur pulleys w/ceramic bearings
    SRAM 990 cassette, 991 Hollow pin chain
    Avid Juicy 7's with Straitline levers - GREAT upgrade
    Easton EC70 Monkeylite Low rise bar, ODI Oury Lock-ons
    Easton EA70 seatpost, Phenom SL seat, 143 mm
    Enduro Seals and fresh rebuild on Fox forks. PUSH will do the RLC upgrade in about a month.
    And to finish, PUSH is building me a custom RP23 in 7.25" x 1.75" size. Should have in in one week, by 8/10.

    When done, I'll have about $4500 into her, and she is coming in at 26.3 pounds. Just about the same spec and price as the Pro, only better in the suspension. And the pleasure of building it up myself.

  9. #9
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    I probably going to upgrade the tires first, then the brakes and shifter later on. Are there any tires that are less likely to get flats from pinching, and handle really well? Price isn't really an issue. I just want really good tires. I don't see anything wrong with the tires but like I said in my previous posts I have nothing to base them on.

  10. #10
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    Quick question about tires. What psi should the tires be at for riding on pavement and for trails. Should they be higher for pavement riding and lower for trail riding?

  11. #11
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    if you can really afford it, swap the triad for an RP23. there's a thread out there about it.

    two methods to do it. buy it from push and have it reduced or buy it from a cannondale dealer. because the stumpy uses and odd shock size.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Linga115
    if you can really afford it, swap the triad for an RP23. there's a thread out there about it.

    two methods to do it. buy it from push and have it reduced or buy it from a cannondale dealer. because the stumpy uses and odd shock size.
    I am probably going to stay away from suspension upgrades. Knowing me I'll probably go out an buy a new bike about a year from now. Basically, I am looking for some easy upgrades that the bike could use to even out some of its weaknesses(mentioned in reviews)

  13. #13
    Fortes Fortuna Iuvat
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    Quote Originally Posted by whysoserious
    Quick question about tires. What psi should the tires be at for riding on pavement and for trails. Should they be higher for pavement riding and lower for trail riding?
    Higher PSI for pavement to decrease rolling resistance, lower PSI for trails to increase traction and bump compliance. Just how low of a pressure you decide to use for the trail will depend on your body weight, intended trails, riding style, tire size and design. Always err on the high side unless you enjoy fixing flats. Most people use slightly more pressure in the rear tire since it carries more of your weight.

    The recommended range for tire pressures are typically located on the sidewall of the tire, e.g: 35-60PSI.

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