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  1. #1
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    Is my Camber Pro enough?

    I have just got into mountain bike riding since moving out of home. I didnt realise the area I live in is very rock, with lots of roots, rock gardens and full of 1-2ft drops and many even larger ones.

    I just recently bought a Camber Pro. It has 120mm travel fork and shock.

    The specs are outline in more detail here.
    Specialized Bicycle Components : Camber Pro

    I dont really want to do bigger drops but I want to be able to get thru the 1-2ft drops without destroying my bike. Is 5inch travel enough? I am about 95kg equipped.

    Any thoughts are appreciated. Thanks in advanced.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by hakea View Post
    I have just got into mountain bike riding since moving out of home. I didnt realise the area I live in is very rock, with lots of roots, rock gardens and full of 1-2ft drops and many even larger ones.

    I just recently bought a Camber Pro. It has 120mm travel fork and shock.

    The specs are outline in more detail here.
    Specialized Bicycle Components : Camber Pro

    I dont really want to do bigger drops but I want to be able to get thru the 1-2ft drops without destroying my bike. Is 5inch travel enough? I am about 95kg equipped.

    Any thoughts are appreciated. Thanks in advanced.
    This...

    Specialized Bicycle Components

  3. #3
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    +1 For the Stumpy

    Quote Originally Posted by Stumpjumper61 View Post
    I recently sold my camber elite 29er and then purchased the '12 Stumpjumper Elite. I completely agree with Stumpjumper 61, the Stumpys are phenomenal. However, there's two things that get you through rock gardens, drops, roots, etc.. the bike and yourself. Cheaper solution would be to build your bike handling skills, but cheaper isn't always more fun.

  4. #4
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    100% yes

    Your Camber is absolutly capable of carving up rocky trails with small drops. Ride it and enjoy it. The difference in performance between a camber and a stumpjumper in my opinion is not large enough to justlfy the cost of switching. The main difference is Geometry. Ride more worry less.
    Visiting St george/Hurricane? Stay at my vacation rental. Discounts for MTB's

    http://www.vrbo.com/392904

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  5. #5
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    Do you have a 2011 Camber Pro? If so, that's 100mm suspension, not 120 unless you upgraded. Do you have the air and sag set correctly. I have the 2011 Camber Pro and it was initially set up for a much lighter rider, once I corrected that it was like a different bike.

  6. #6
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    A buddy of mine is over 100kg and uses a Camber Comp,wich means lousy RS fork and shock. He just replaced stock wheels with Shimano SLX and he just beat the heck out of that bike on some very nasty all mountain trails, so I guess you'll do fine with it. Of course as a Stumpy FSR user myself I can tell I have a lot more fun or better said more confidence and I've been throught a couple of episodes were I was glad to have 140mms available. Either way go ahead and ejnoy your very capable Camber,when time will come to upgrade you'll know that.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by rond View Post
    Do you have a 2011 Camber Pro? If so, that's 100mm suspension, not 120 unless you upgraded. Do you have the air and sag set correctly. I have the 2011 Camber Pro and it was initially set up for a much lighter rider, once I corrected that it was like a different bike.

    FRAME M4 hydroformed tubing, sealed cartridge bearing pivots, disc only, Command Post routing, replaceable deraileur hanger, bolt on cable guides, 120mm travel

    REAR SHOCK Custom Fox Triad II for Specialized, custom on-the-fly 3-position switch 1) lock out 2) Open 3) ProPedal, rebound adj., 7.875x2.0"

    FORK Fox F120 RL, air spring, reb adj., LO, standard drop-outs, disk, 120mm travel

    ... that means 120mm??

    I particularly like climbing on technical training (im not very good at it) so I guess the camber is ideal for me in the end.

    Thanks everyone for putting my mind at ease, its a lot of money for me (a student) to be switching and changing bikes. I guess you are right about riding more, the more I ride the better ill come at picking lines and placing my weight.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by hakea View Post
    FRAME M4 hydroformed tubing, sealed cartridge bearing pivots, disc only, Command Post routing, replaceable deraileur hanger, bolt on cable guides, 120mm travel

    REAR SHOCK Custom Fox Triad II for Specialized, custom on-the-fly 3-position switch 1) lock out 2) Open 3) ProPedal, rebound adj., 7.875x2.0"

    FORK Fox F120 RL, air spring, reb adj., LO, standard drop-outs, disk, 120mm travel

    ... that means 120mm??

    I particularly like climbing on technical training (im not very good at it) so I guess the camber is ideal for me in the end.

    Thanks everyone for putting my mind at ease, its a lot of money for me (a student) to be switching and changing bikes. I guess you are right about riding more, the more I ride the better ill come at picking lines and placing my weight.




    We must be talking different years. I have a 2011 Camber Pro and the specs on it for the fork and shock are:

    Fork Fox F100 RL 29, air spring, alloy steerer, reb adj., LO, standard drop-outs, disk, 100mm travel
    Rear Shock Custom Fox Triad II for Specialized, custom on-the-fly 3-position switch 1) lock out 2) Open 3) ProPedal, rebound adj., 7.875x1.9"


    Make sure you check the air and the sag, regardless of which year you have. When I bought mine the bike shop must have forgotten to check it before delivering it to me. The first time I rode it I hated it. Once the air and sag were set, it was like riding a different bike.

  9. #9
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by hakea View Post
    I have just got into mountain bike riding....
    Your Camber Pro is good enough. Just get out and ride it. Only worry about upgrades if something breaks.

  12. #12
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    Good enough???

    Your Camber is an awesome bike. Awesome. Some people on this forum are bike snobs. Only the latest and greatest will do. You have a fine machine there. Maintain it and replace things as they break/wear out.
    Visiting St george/Hurricane? Stay at my vacation rental. Discounts for MTB's

    http://www.vrbo.com/392904

    PM me

  13. #13
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    If you are doubting your Camber (which I am thinking you are due to you composing a thread questioning it), you may want to look at the Stumpjumper as others have suggested. I found myself in-between the Enduro and the Stumpjumper and ended up buying an Enduro and hated it after several rides. Picked up the Stumpy and couldn't be happier. The right bike for the conditions you are riding in makes mountain biking so much more enjoyable.

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