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  1. #1
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    How to fix E150 stiction?

    I think it is stiction. I've gone out for about 7 rides on the enduro sl so far and the suspension has felt great. This last time yesterday, the fork definately felt very insensitive to small bumps & overall just not as responsive. It was a pretty easy trail and afterwards, my hands felt sore which should not happen considering the very moderate level of this trail.
    If it is stiction - how do you go about fixing it?
    I ride with about 95psi. The 1st 6 rides, this felt very supple. This last ride, with the fork at the exact same pressure, the fork felt a lot more rigid and the bike just felt dead.
    How do you remedy this? Is it a small issue or something that would involve the LBS?
    thanks

  2. #2
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    How much do you weigh running 95psi? Are you getting proper sag w/ rebound/compression both full counter clockwise on the fork @ that air pressure? If you are getting proper sag, and are running full cc on the compression adjust, I would probably get the LBS involved--it can't hurt to ask. The e150 is known to have fairly poor small bump compliance, but if the performance is changing for the worse I would not expect that to be normal "breaking in".

    On a side note, the stock grips are really skinny and hurt some peoples hands.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by TXPhisher
    How much do you weigh running 95psi? Are you getting proper sag w/ rebound/compression both full counter clockwise on the fork @ that air pressure? If you are getting proper sag, and are running full cc on the compression adjust, I would probably get the LBS involved--it can't hurt to ask. The e150 is known to have fairly poor small bump compliance, but if the performance is changing for the worse I would not expect that to be normal "breaking in".

    On a side note, the stock grips are really skinny and hurt some peoples hands.
    I probably should really measure the sag per the video but my reference point is the suspension quality of the first couple of rides on the same trails. And during those rides, the small bump sensitivity felt great at 95 psi. I weigh about 200 with gear
    would it possibly be a problem with the seals letting in dirt that can accumulate inside the lowers?

  4. #4
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    I have spent many rides trying to get the front end to behave over small bumps but have not succeeded - it can feel like you're being shaken to pieces sometimes. The bike shop couldn't improve things either. I didn't realize that this was 'a feature'.

  5. #5
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    after spending some time demoing the 08 i found running a fast rebound keeps the fork high in the stroke and plusher on small chatter bumps. i set my sag to spec and ran the lo speed comp in the middle to softer setting.

  6. #6
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    I guess you could play with the spike valve air pressure, but lowering it too much would eliminate the whole purpose of the futureshock. I really don't mind the firmer ride on the smaller hits, it's a trade off for pedal efficiency. The middle setting for compression is fairly high. I only use a few clicks at a time (I think I'm 4 clicks in right now).

  7. #7
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    If its any help, the forks on my SL (April 07) started to run noticeably plusher once they had some decent mileage on them and I had lifted the wipers and cleaned/re-lubed the foam ring at 6 months old.
    Whether its one (running-in) or the other (re-lube the foam rings) I cant tell. But they have definitely loosened up with a few miles on them....

  8. #8
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    How to fix E150 stiction?

    I notice an increased level of stiction or binding if I do not do the following with the sliders after every ride or two. Thoroughly clean the entire slider and area around the dust covers. I use one of the auto detailing sprays (Mothers Showtime) to clean things up. I then drip Triflow about the sliders and work the front suspension for several cycles to distribute the lube into and about the seal. I then wipe everything down, being careful to leave no lube behind to attract debris. Every so often I also wax the sliders with Mothers Carnuba wax. I have been doing this all since early 2007 without any problems or leaks. I use and have used this procedure with other forks with good results as well. Just another thing to do when lubing the chain. Only takes a minute, keeps things working well. Also, be sure to check the torque on your triple clamps about your sliders. Mine loosened up a couple of times during the first few months of riding and then were fine after a couple rounds of tightening.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr_ian_credible
    If its any help, the forks on my SL (April 07) started to run noticeably plusher once they had some decent mileage on them and I had lifted the wipers and cleaned/re-lubed the foam ring at 6 months old.
    Whether its one (running-in) or the other (re-lube the foam rings) I cant tell. But they have definitely loosened up with a few miles on them....
    how do you lift the wipers? and once lifted, is there anything i should do / not do so that oil doesnt leak out?

  10. #10
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    To lift the wipers I taped up a (thin) flat-head screwdriver and then carefully eased it in between the bottom of the wiper and the top of the fork leg (actually you need a bit of force here to get the screwdriver to make a gap - I used insulation tape around teh screwdriver in case I slipped). I then did similar at various other points around the top of the fork leg (before the fork arch gets in the way). Then back to the first insertion point and this time give the screwdriver a 1/4 of a turn. I kept doing this over and over - small lifts, then move on. It didn't take long before the whole seal lifts clear of the fork.
    The foam 'O' ring inside is open ended - just a long strip of foam. I took that out, squeezed out the old, dirty oil and put it back in.
    I bought a Fox fluid 'pillow pack' and used half in each fork leg and then tamped down the wiper seal with a socket extension. Job done. Most of my guidance came from the Fox website - http://www.foxracingshox.com/fox_tec...seal_clean.htm
    The only tips I would give are : make sure everything is clean around the wiper seal - you don't want any debris falling down into the fork leg and : go very slow. I don't think there is anything fragile here, and you'll probably nick the outside of the wiper seal as the screwdriver tip goes in the first time (I did.....both sides), but the seal seems deep and sturdy enough so no harm done and by the look of it - its not exactly flooded with lube in there, so its something I plan to do fairly regularly. Besides - shouldn't wiper seals be replaced annually ? Every other year ? so if I do nick the outside edge of the seal - it'll be replaced eventually.
    Hope this helps - good luck..

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr_ian_credible
    To lift the wipers I taped up a (thin) flat-head screwdriver and then carefully eased it in between the bottom of the wiper and the top of the fork leg (actually you need a bit of force here to get the screwdriver to make a gap - I used insulation tape around teh screwdriver in case I slipped). I then did similar at various other points around the top of the fork leg (before the fork arch gets in the way). Then back to the first insertion point and this time give the screwdriver a 1/4 of a turn. I kept doing this over and over - small lifts, then move on. It didn't take long before the whole seal lifts clear of the fork.
    The foam 'O' ring inside is open ended - just a long strip of foam. I took that out, squeezed out the old, dirty oil and put it back in.
    I bought a Fox fluid 'pillow pack' and used half in each fork leg and then tamped down the wiper seal with a socket extension. Job done. Most of my guidance came from the Fox website - http://www.foxracingshox.com/fox_tec...seal_clean.htm
    The only tips I would give are : make sure everything is clean around the wiper seal - you don't want any debris falling down into the fork leg and : go very slow. I don't think there is anything fragile here, and you'll probably nick the outside of the wiper seal as the screwdriver tip goes in the first time (I did.....both sides), but the seal seems deep and sturdy enough so no harm done and by the look of it - its not exactly flooded with lube in there, so its something I plan to do fairly regularly. Besides - shouldn't wiper seals be replaced annually ? Every other year ? so if I do nick the outside edge of the seal - it'll be replaced eventually.
    Hope this helps - good luck..
    thanks for that - incredibly helpful. Do you think its smart to add a bit of oil into each leg since the foam ring essentially tranfers oil from inside fork to outside stanchion over time, hence depleting the oil supply in the lowers?

  12. #12
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    check alignment of crowns & legs

    Assuming you have the correct amount of sag and corresponding air pressure, you should also check the crown/leg alignment. If you crash sometimes the legs can get twisted in the crown and cause binding.

    To fix/check this first loosen all the pinch bolts on the upper and lower crowns. Then let enough air out of the fork to compress it to almost full bottom. While it is at full bottom re-torque the pinch bolts, first the lower crown, then upper crown. I believe the torque values are 50 in/lbs for the lower crown and 75 in/lbs for the upper, but check the Specialized website to make sure. They also have a pretty cool section on E150 setup if you have not seen it yet.

    My '08 E150 is nice and buttery, my hands feel like they have been gently massaged each time I ride. I hope you can get yours this way as well, this bike/fork rocks!!

  13. #13
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    Thanks for all the recent postings, some real gems there.

  14. #14
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    CMA762.......yeah - adding a bit of oil is ok. The fork lowers only hold about 5-10cc's of oil anyway and most of what you would put in during a wiper service would stay in the foam ring. So I would guess only a small amount would make it down to the fork lowers.
    After every wet ride I also usually put a couple of drops of Fox fork fluid on the fork leg - smear it round so it completely circles the fork leg - then cycle the fork through its travel a couple of times and wipe off whatever is on the leg.
    You'd be surprised at the amount of dirt and debris that comes up out of the wiper seal suspended in the oil you just cycled through.......
    Can't hurt.......this thing cost me 1699.....I'm doing all I can to keep it healthy..........

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