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  1. #1
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    How big are 700C wheels

    I take it they are larger than 26 inches but by how much.

    Thinking of getting a "wimpy" Crosstrail vs the HR, I know, i know, HR is tougher but I am lightweight and pushing 50. You can add fenders also to help keep your clothes clean.

    Minds pretty made up, just need to decide which 2011 model, the Sport Disk for $700 US or the Pro for $1,200. Comp for $940 is out, don't like the paint color and the crankset is still Sun. I would get the Sport in all black but the Pro comes silver and black--looks cooler plus has many upgrades. I decide once at the shop but leaning on going cheaper $700, heck I haven't rode pedal bikes for 20 years, what if I think its so-so. Could sell it on Ebay next summer if I really like bike riding and then know for sure what I want in my bike.
    Last edited by Skylor; 10-13-2010 at 07:02 PM.

  2. #2
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    700 cm = 27.5 in
    "Donuts. Is there anything they can't do?"

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skylor
    I take it they are larger than 26 inches but by how much.
    By roughly 3 inches per wheel; their mountain equivalent is the 29er wheel.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Castigador
    By roughly 3 inches per wheel; their mountain equivalent is the 29er wheel.
    Things aren't always what they're said to be.
    The tape measure will tell you otherwise.
    May the air be filled with tires!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Castigador
    By roughly 3 inches per wheel; their mountain equivalent is the 29er wheel.
    Lol roughly. 1" = 2.54cm, so 700mm = 27.5590551.

    Always ask a machinist when wondering exact size.
    Last edited by AlpineE30M52; 10-14-2010 at 06:45 PM.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by pop_martian
    700 cm = 27.5 in
    Quote Originally Posted by AlpineE30M52
    Lol roughly. 1" = 2.54cm, so 700cm = 27.5590551.

    Always ask a machinist when wondering exact size.
    Better double check your math there boys. 700cm = 275.59 in.

    What exactly do you machine? Just so I know to stay away from it.

    The bead seat diameter of a road wheel, which is what we're talking about here, is actually 622mm (24.5 in.). This is the only standard by which clincher style rims are measured. Meaning the actual outer diameter can vary amongst manufacturers. Which explains why some are easier to get tires on than others.

    From the wikipedia entry:
    "In practice, most tires (and inner tubes) sold today carry apart from the modern ISO 5775-1 designation also some historic size markings, for which there exists no longer any officially maintained definition, but which are still widely used:
    - an old French tire designation that was based on the approximate outer diameter of the inflated tire in millimeters: 70035 C.
    - an old British inch-based designation: 597 mm (26 1), 590 mm (26 1⅜, which is the most common), 630 mm (27 1), and 635 mm (28 1)."

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/rim-sizing.html

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicycle_wheel

    Sorry, probably more than anyone wanted to know about bicycle wheels. Lots of confusion on this topic though with all these "standards" and with all the numbers printed on the side of tires and tubes.

    Cheers!
    Last edited by goneskiian; 10-14-2010 at 02:11 AM.

  7. #7
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    Hahaha That was posted after a VERY Long day. :/

  8. #8
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    Automotive tires are the same way on sizes, not all manufacture tires the same mark size are the same outside diameter.

    Nice to know they are a little bigger than 26 inches, sounds like a good size, not too small, not too big

    I'm running out to a different dealer this afternoon, last place was hip but too bent on steering me to a bike for a 30 year old--the HR, than for a 50 year old, I look younger but not sure if I feel younger, lol. This way I can grow in to the bike since I be 50 sooner than I be 30,

    And this place claims to match internet prices from other dealers, so I might save $75-$100 depending on the bike I get--hope they have all models in stock and in my small size.

  9. #9
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    Got back from my LBS. Tires measure to 27 1/2 inches on a Crosstrail Comp 2010.

    Went with the Sport Dist model, he match the price of $630, very cool. Special order, I get it next week, said if I don't like it, no problems, can upgrade, downgrade, change my mind and get a full refund, yea.

    Place had some wimpy music playing, no hip hop with stunt bike videos playing, unlike the last shop, only bummer, lol

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlpineE30M52
    Lol roughly. 1" = 2.54cm, so 700cm = 27.5590551.

    Always ask a machinist when wondering exact size.

    Yep, you were right on

  11. #11
    PVR
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skylor
    Yep, you were right on
    ...well, if he had used mm instead of cm anyway!

  12. #12
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    Skylor - Bottom line, what you're looking at with a 700c wheel is basically a wheel that is most commonly used on road bicycles. Yes, the kind of bicycles Lance Armstrong rides and that you see used in the Tour de France.

    Just to confuse things further, if you throw a big fat knobby tire on there you can call it a 29er. That's right, the newest thing in mountain biking is the use of road wheels on them.

    Cheers!
    Last edited by goneskiian; 10-14-2010 at 01:49 PM.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skylor
    Went with the Sport Dist model, he match the price of $630, very cool. Special order, I get it next week, said if I don't like it, no problems, can upgrade, downgrade, change my mind and get a full refund, yea.
    One thing to consider is where you're going to be riding it.

    The Specialized Borough XC Sport tyres that come on the Specialized Crosstrail Sport Disc are semi slicks. They'll be fine on tarmac or light gravel but if you get anywhere near any mud won't offer you much grip.

    If you're going to be using the bike exclusively on tarmac then a slick tyre will roll better and give more speed.

  14. #14
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    Well tires can be changed and all the Crosstrails came with the same tire. My "cheap" $630 bike has hyd disk brakes, likely cheap but I'm light weight-130 lbs- and getting the small frame so less mass to stop. Can always upgrade but should work ok for a while.

    The sales guy did say for packed dirt trails it be ok but loose gravel others tires grip better but all slip on loose gravel. He did say its not a "real" mountain bike but for my local park and quick trips around town it should be nice. Said on the paved road its a faster tire-cool

    Said Specialized sells lots of those Crosstrails--he said it afterward. The warehouses was showing 50+ in stock and the HR 15 inch on Monday at the other place only had 1...unless that shop was pressing me in to getting it before it was gone, maybe!

    For a first bicycle since 1978 its a good pick I hope. They really changed them since then, oh the boys bikes look awesome for $350, wish I had one when I was 10 years old

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by goneskiian
    Skylor - Bottom line, what you're looking at with a 700c wheel is basically a wheel that is most commonly used on road bicycles. Yes, the kind of bicycles Lance Armstrong rides and that you see used in the Tour de France.

    Just to confuse things further, if you throw a big fat knobby tire on there you can call it a 29er. That's right, the newest thing in mountain biking is the use of road wheels on them.

    Cheers!

    So awesome, I could get nice 29er tires. Maybe even just the front or back depending on what slips bad--or both or none. The trails I have seen a 1/3 way in are all pack solid hard trails, no loose anything, some twigs, if I blow it I get real mountain tires.

    I would guess the reason mountain bikes first and still many do come with 26 inch rims were for strength-shorter spokes-and lighter weight.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by PVR
    ...well, if he had used mm instead of cm anyway!
    Awe that isn't no biggie. I knew what he meant

    Who was the idiot who invented the metric system anyhow

  17. #17
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    ^ A French man that had way more common sense than any of us. Metric is the awesome.


    Fix my oops post... haha

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metric_system

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skylor
    So awesome, I could get nice 29er tires. Maybe even just the front or back depending on what slips bad--or both or none. The trails I have seen a 1/3 way in are all pack solid hard trails, no loose anything, some twigs, if I blow it I get real mountain tires.

    I would guess the reason mountain bikes first and still many do come with 26 inch rims were for strength-shorter spokes-and lighter weight.
    Check the frame clearance for what tires you can fit. I would suspect you could fit a smallish 29er tire on there just fine, which it sounds like would be all that you'd need.

    As for why mountain bikes started with 26 inch wheels, no that's not why. At least according to some. From what I've read it was mostly due to tire availability and the fact that there weren't any large volume tires made in the larger wheel size. Yes, there's more to the story and it also depends on who you ask so corner Gary Fisher, Joe Breezer, or Tom Ritchey (or any other of the "Marin" gang) and ask for the low down.

    Cheers!

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