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  1. #1
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    Idea! FSR Pivot Bearing Overhaul

    This is a guide for replacing the rear suspension pivot bearings on a 2001 Specialized Enduro. From around 1999/2000 the FSR design utilised sealed cartridge bearings rather than the nylon bushes used since the design was introduced. Not having been fortunate enough to dismantle any more recent models than my own, it has to be an assumption that any FSR beyond 2002 has more or less the same pivot assemblies.

    Edit. For Horst link bearing assemblies, the method below is only applicable for pre-02 Enduros and pre-04 Stumpjumpers. Check out waynosdias's '04 SJ Bearings' thread for information on some later versions. I have an 07 Big Hit on the way so I'll update this guide once I've pulled the bearings on that!!
    I’m new to bike maintenance myself, having only got into it in the last year or so, so please excuse me if the balance of information (too much/too little) wobbles at times.

    To the best of my knowledge, if anyone other than a ‘qualified’ mechanic replaces the bearings on your bike then your warranty will become worthless. Whether this applies only to the rear end which, at least in the UK, has only a three year warranty, I do not know. My second-hand frame was five this year and it’s already been powder-coated so I think I’m safe to assume I didn’t even have a warranty to worry about.
    Remember that it is your choice to do this job; I’m just showing you how I did mine. If you break something or void your warranty in the process it is your fault and I accept absolutely zero responsibility for the mistakes of heavy-handed amateur wrenches and professionals alike. Pulling bearings is not a particularly fine art; pushing them is only slightly more complex. I used presses constructed from long bolts, wrench sockets and a variety of washers and spacers. Using a hand or bench vice would make some parts of this job this job much easier.

    If you're feeling play in the rear of your FSR, the first thing to check is the shock-eye bushes, as these will wear out long before any other suspension components. Disconnect the shock one end at a time and check for play.

    ‘2RS’ indicates that a bearing has two rubber seals. ZZ indicates metal shields. I used 2RS’s for the two 6000 bearings and ZZ’s for the six 688’s. I run inner tube all around the rearmost pivots as an effective seal, so was happy using the metal sealed bearings. Although I manufactured a ‘fender’ to deflect most of the debris/water that the rear tyre throws up, I prefer the flexibility of the rubber seals for the front (BB) bearings.
    In total, the stay pivots on a 2001 FSR should use; (chainstay) 2 x 6000 2RS bearings and (seatstay) 6 x 688 2RS/ZZ bearings, plus 2 x 688 2RS/ZZ in the suspension link.
    The 6000 bearings have the dimensions; 26mm (OD) x 10mm (ID) x 8mm (W)
    The 688 bearings have the dimensions; 16mm (OD) x 8mm (ID) x 5mm (W)

    I used a rubber mallet (a hammer is overkill for bike bearings) to remove the first bearing/spacer from the top of the seatstay. We’re dealing with bike bearings here and the effort required should be minimal. Using a press is much more gentle and progressive and so is far less likely to cause any damage to the frame. Getting them out is one thing but I strongly advise against using anything other than the press method for replacing any pivot bearings. Using a press allows you to visually check that the bearing is going in straight, and does it slowly enough for you to make necessary adjustments along the way.

    The only real problem that I can foresee in this job is that one of the bearings may separate from itself, leaving the outer race lodged in the frame. If, upon inspection of all the pivots, it looks like there may be corrosion between the steel races and the aluminium of the frame, spray some WD40, or similar, onto the bearings and give it time to soak in. Make sure the horrible stuff is entirely removed before fitting your new bearings. New bearings should get a thin coat of thick grease around the edge before refitting. It'll aid their insertion and also help prevent any premature corrosion.
    Just take it nice and slow when you press bearings back in. Misaligned bearings could easily damage the stay apertures.

    Ed. The problem of bearings seperating in the stays seems to be overcome with a miniature headset cup remover (a small pipe with a split cut at one end). Replies #10-16.

    If a specific size socket is needed for a particular press I’ll mention it. For building up spacers and the rest of the presses I used, amongst other things, a load of old rear shock bushes which I’ve collected over time. It’ll become clear as you get into it what size/shape pieces you need for your presses. I'd advise against using current shock bushes as they can be damaged by the pressing process.

    Lower Seatstay Pivots

    Note the four top-hat style washers which are pressed into the chainstay apertures (2). These can be left in place during this procedure. Check, while you’re here, that all four washers are set firmly in the stay and have no play.

    1Block.jpg

    Picture (5) shows the pivot at the bottom of the seatstay with a press in place. The pivot assembly can be seen in pictures (1) to (4). On the right of the press assembly is a 16mm socket. The lip of the socket sits against the stay whilst the hole is large enough to accept the bearing without impeding its progress. On the left side of the press assembly is a tube which has an external diameter of 8mm (actually the centre tube from the old style nylon bushes, but you should be able to get something similar from a good hardware store). You may get lucky with a 3/16” socket if you're using a vice rather than a bolted press. A bolt runs through the tube and the socket and has a nut on the end. When the nut is tightened the assembly is compressed and the tube pushes against the spacer (ii) which is squeezed out into the body of the 16mm socket, taking with it the right hand bearing.

    2Block.jpg

    The left hand bearing can be removed by switching the press (7) so the socket is on the left side and the pressure is applied to the inner race of the bearing from inside the stay. I used the top-hat type washers from the upper seatstay assembly (11), inverted, to seat against the bearing race. Picture (8) shows the full press assembly for this part of the job.

    My bearings came out without issue and had not suffered any serious corrosion to the races, spacer or frame. Use a fine (1000) sandpaper or wire wool to clean the spacer if it shows any signs of corrosion. Make sure all swarf is removed before refitting. Thoroughly clean and dry the frame aperture.

    The press in picture (9) uses two large washers to press the first bearing back into the stay. The washers should be larger than the stay aperture. The bearing is being pressed into the right side and you’ll notice in the picture that it’s slightly out of alignment. I found that a small amount of shift tends to get pressed out as the bearing goes in. Keep a close eye on it though, and be prepared to switch the press assembly to remove the bearing and start again.
    Once the first bearing is installed the spacer can be greased (I use Pedro’s Syn Grease) and dropped into place (10). The second bearing can then be pressed in.
    For both bearings the outer race should be perfectly flush with the stay.

    The second pivot is identical to the first.




    Upper Seatstay Pivots

    3aBlock.jpg

    Picture (11) shows the bearing assembly at the top of the seatstay. Basically the same as the lower assembly just with a longer spacer. Note the top-hat style washers inserted into the bearings on each side.
    I used a 3/16" socket to tap out the spacer and one of the bearings (12/13) although the 8mm tube used for the lower bearings could be used in a press.
    A 16mm socket was used to press out the remaining bearing (14/15)
    Picture (16) shows the press assembly for inserting the first bearing. Remember that the washer that faces up to the bearing must contact the outer race fully so you're not pressing on the bearing seals (17).
    The spacer should have a thin coat of grease and be dropped into the stay, making sure it is correctly seated in the bearing. The advantage of using a press here is that the bolt running through it will assist in keeping the spacer central to the bearings.
    Press the second bearing in very slowly, checking regularly that the spacer is settling in between the inner races. It obviously helps to keep the whole assembly vertical for this part.
    Picture (18) shows everything in place, bar the top-hat style washers which drop into the bearings before refitting the seatstay to the suspension link.

    I use BETD’s suspension linkage which is fitted with needle bearings. The original Specialized link has two 688 2RS bearings which come out in the same way to those in the upper seatstay. Pictures 19-22 show the pivot and press assemblies.

    Flip Flop Bearings

    4Block.jpg


    Because I had already replaced the two main bearings next to the bottom bracket, the only picture I currently have is of an old chainstay (23). I'll update this shortly as I'll be overhauling a 2003 BigHit in the next couple of weeks.. These two bearings, 6000 2RS, are very easy to remove/replace using a ghetto press similar to those seen here, using a 1” socket. They can only be pressed from the inside-out.


    5Block.jpg

    Wipe any excess grease from all the new bearings as it will only attract dust/grit.

    With both stays bolted back in to place and the rear shock detached, move the rear triangle through its range of motion. It should be pretty much effortless and silent, too. Remember that the bolts on the lower pivots use nylock nuts and shouldn't be overtightened; they only need enough torque to pull the bearing assembly together.

    Peace,
    Steve
    Last edited by SteveUK; 01-24-2007 at 09:25 AM. Reason: update

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  2. #2
    Specialized Rida
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    Great write up. We need more member like you and threads like this.

  3. #3
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    Thanks man. You just renewed my faith in bike forums.

  4. #4
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    stuck bearing ring

    Thank you so much for the write up and especially the pictures. I had heard about using a socket to tap in bearings. But creating a press with some nuts, bolts, washers and ingenuity was pretty amazing!

    My only problem is that I bought a bearign puller, and on trying to pull out the bearing, it just pulled all the guts out. So now I have the outside "ring" stuck inside. And as yet I haven't found any way to get it out. I think I'm going to have to go buy a dremel and start eating away at the ring in a few places hoping to weaken it enough that I can pry it out???

    Anybody else have any ideas on getting it out???

    Thanks
    Chris

  5. #5
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    Hey Chris,

    This came up in another thread (shouldn't be too far down from this one), where one of the 6000 bearings from the BB pivot had done the same thing. One solution was to drill a couple of small holes in the stay behind the stuck race, then tap it out with a nail, or similar.
    This would be something of a last-gasp effort for me. If you can drill a small hole in the race and then tap it out from behind with a nail, using the hole as an anchor point, it may work out. You could try maybe four holes, at the main points of a compass, and work your way around, gradually pushing the race out.
    Let us know if you discover an ingenious solution...
    Peace,
    Steve

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  6. #6
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    Yes, the photos are great: clear and laid out neatly. Thank you for your time and effort.

  7. #7
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    Dude! the same thing happened to me just yesterday morning! I knocked out the balls and inner race, and the outer race was stuck. I wouldn't say I was too forceful, the bearing was shot and I basically pulled the guts out with my fingers. So, I let it soak overnight with WD-40 and had no luck getting the race out this morning. I'm kinda bummed out because I ride a pretty cool trail into work, but I need my FS bike.

    It's a 2001 bighit and the bearing race is stuck at the top of the seat stay. I'd rather not get destructive just yet. Any ideas?

    And I second the motion that SteveUK is awesome. What are the chances that I go about replacing the bolts and bearings on my FSR, and then I find this thread...?


    Quote Originally Posted by stiingya
    Thank you so much for the write up and especially the pictures. I had heard about using a socket to tap in bearings. But creating a press with some nuts, bolts, washers and ingenuity was pretty amazing!

    My only problem is that I bought a bearign puller, and on trying to pull out the bearing, it just pulled all the guts out. So now I have the outside "ring" stuck inside. And as yet I haven't found any way to get it out. I think I'm going to have to go buy a dremel and start eating away at the ring in a few places hoping to weaken it enough that I can pry it out???

    Anybody else have any ideas on getting it out???

    Thanks
    Chris

  8. #8
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    Last edited by rad8; 09-19-2006 at 10:21 AM. Reason: double post

  9. #9
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    RE: stuck race.

    If you got one side out, take that one apart and use the guts from it to "rebuild" the stuck one, then try to press/knock it out again. If they're both are stuck, buy an extra new bearing and sacrifice it to try and get the others out. This has been done by others with success (rebuilding with old parts to get it out). Do a search, there's another really long thread on it. I would try everything else (except for heat) to get them out before drilling holes in anything. Using a dremel tool carefully on the inside of the race as a last resort (because once you do that you can't even rebuild it and leave the old race in there).
    Last edited by WaveDude; 09-19-2006 at 09:13 PM.

  10. #10
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    "...the bearing race is stuck at the top of the seat stay. I'd rather not get destructive just yet. Any ideas?"

    Can you get in from behind? I don't suppose the assembly is too diferent from the stay on the Enduro (picture 11) where the bearing is seated into the stay. If you've got one bearing and the spacer out, see if there's any overlap on the inside of the hole; could you get a screwdriver in to tap the race out? Maybe even something like a miniature ghetto headset cup remover; a piece of pipe cut at cross-sections at one end so that it opens out.
    Could you post a picture or two so I can get an idea of the assembly/offending race?
    Peace,
    Steve

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  11. #11
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    *Bump*

  12. #12
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    Hi, I have a 4mo old baby, so I'm kinda slow.

    Yes, I got the other one out fine. And no there isn't much overlap from behind the race. I've picked up a pipe to use the technique analogous to removing a headset cup.

    Here is a pic, I took this before I got the other bearing out so the tube that fits between the bearings is still in place (to knock out the other bearing):

  13. #13
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    Just done all my '04 bearings on my enduro. It was all pretty easy except the horst link bearings.

    They are a bit different to the earlier models. There is a lip as before between the 2 bearings, but now there is only a washer that sits above the lip inbetween the 2 bearings rather than that spacer. This made it very hard to get them out, as there is nowhere to get a grip on the bearing from the inside. In the end i had to use a screwdriver and a hammer, working around the edges slowly to knock them out. it left some marks on the washer between the bearings, but nothing too bad.

    If any one has a better way to do that part, it would make the whole proccess very simple, wish i had thougt to take some piccys

  14. #14
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    Good news, before I went to work I tried out the pipe contraption that SteveUK suggested. And I got the bearing race part way out. I had to go to work so I couldn't finish the job, but I'm on my way. I'll take some pics.

  15. #15
    Supremely Unco-ordinated
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    Now THAT is a well thought out forum post!! Looks very clear and easy to follow.

    Hats off to you sir
    Post your youtube mountain bike videos and they'll be included in our interactive World MTB video map!

  16. #16
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    Well, I got the bearing race out of the chainstay. I used a small pipe, split at one end like a headcup removal tool. If I were to do it again I would use a steel pipe. I used copper and it's too soft. As you can in the pic it ended up getting all mangled. But hey! It worked. The rest of the process was easy. Took me just a few more minutes. I followed SteveUKs directions on making a press with a bolt and some washers. Sweet.


  17. #17
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    Nice one, rad8. Could you post a picture of the pipe you used to hammer out the remains of the bearing? I don't think that this will be a particularly common problem, at least I hope not, but I'm sure it would be useful to have a picture of the 'tool'. What was the bore/diameter of the pipe you used?
    Peace,
    Steve

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  18. #18
    Glorified Hybrid Owner
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    Great write up...let us know when you get SUED by SPECIALizED!

  19. #19
    Specialized Rida
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockhound
    Great write up...let us know when you get SUED by SPECIALizED!

    WTF

  20. #20
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    "..let us know when you get SUED by SPECIALizED!"

    I promise, you'll be the first to know....why, exactly?

    What use is a philosopher who doesn't hurt anybody's feelings? -
    Diogenes


  21. #21
    Glorified Hybrid Owner
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveUK
    "..let us know when you get SUED by SPECIALizED!"

    I promise, you'll be the first to know....why, exactly?
    Because their company motto is "Sue you. Sue me. Sue everybody!"

  22. #22
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    "Because their company motto is "Sue you. Sue me. Sue everybody!""

    Righty-ho, I'll start saving...

  23. #23
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    Here is the tool I used to remove the stuck bearing race. It is analagous to a headset cup removal tool - for getting behind the race and tapping it out. I made it out of a 3/8" (~1cm) diameter copper pipe that cost $2. As I mentioned previously, copper is too soft. If I were to do it again I would use steel.

    I used a cutoff bit to make a slice down the side. Then pulled the two sides apart. I used a file and grinding bit to give the ends the proper edge to fit into the very very small notch between the frame and the bearing race. The copper being soft, I had to rework the tool after a few taps. At one point I switched ends. In the end this little pipe was mangled, but the race had come out.




    As for litigation, I think Specialized would give SteveUK a pat on the back and it's the bike shops that would be pissed.

  24. #24
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    Cheers for the pictures and description, rad8, it all adds to the guide.
    Peace,
    Steve

  25. #25
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    Bump...

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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gruff
    Just done all my '04 bearings on my enduro. It was all pretty easy except the horst link bearings.

    They are a bit different to the earlier models. There is a lip as before between the 2 bearings, but now there is only a washer that sits above the lip inbetween the 2 bearings rather than that spacer. This made it very hard to get them out, as there is nowhere to get a grip on the bearing from the inside. In the end i had to use a screwdriver and a hammer, working around the edges slowly to knock them out. it left some marks on the washer between the bearings, but nothing too bad.

    If any one has a better way to do that part, it would make the whole proccess very simple, wish i had thougt to take some piccys
    I had the same problem, took it to a local machine shop and they used a small angled punch to tap it out . First I went to My LBS assuming they would know how to replace bearings on a frame they sell
    first guy: big hammer and socket, starts smacking it trying to drive it through
    Me: carefull, dont you guys have a press?
    second guy: comes over for a look, says we dont have a press, tries clamping it in a vise with socket, sees its not working , says" we cant do it" and hands me the part
    the machine shop didnt even charge me

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gruff
    Just done all my '04 bearings on my enduro. It was all pretty easy except the horst link bearings.
    Follow what I did here:

    04 SJ bearings

    wayne
    89 Univega HT -???-
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    01 Specd enduro FSR
    02 Specd enduro FSR -sold-
    04 Specd stumpjumper FSR
    05 Specd enduro FSR Sworks

  28. #28
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    thanks

    great post and thread!
    I am in the middle of a bearing overhual for my Enduro ('03) FSR . I have worked out a system for pressing in and out my bearings on the EASY pivots = the shocklink to seatstay. I a now trying to get the horst link bearings out. that is a bit harder.
    Richmond, VA
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by cbchess
    great post and thread!
    I am in the middle of a bearing overhual for my Enduro ('03) FSR . I have worked out a system for pressing in and out my bearings on the EASY pivots = the shocklink to seatstay. I a now trying to get the horst link bearings out. that is a bit harder.
    cbchess, I dont think Steve's method will work for your bike, 03 enduro correct? His method works for the pre 02 enduros and pre 04 SJs. Use the method shown in the "04 SJ Bearing" thread.

    wayne
    89 Univega HT -???-
    92 Specd SJ HT M2 -stolen-
    92 Specd SJ HT M2 -sold-
    94 Specd SJ HT M2 -sold-
    97 Klien Mantra -sold-
    01 Specd enduro FSR
    02 Specd enduro FSR -sold-
    04 Specd stumpjumper FSR
    05 Specd enduro FSR Sworks

  30. #30
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    Wayne thanks - you are right - I found that thread and it is helpful and specific to my project.
    Richmond, VA
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    What do you do if your dropout pivot bolts are seized, and I mean they WILL NOT BUDGE? Should I start to drill? They are on a 03 S-Works Epic so the bolts are hollow, I'm a little afraid of hurting the frame. Any ideas would be great.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by grabau
    What do you do if your dropout pivot bolts are seized, and I mean they WILL NOT BUDGE? Should I start to drill? They are on a 03 S-Works Epic so the bolts are hollow, I'm a little afraid of hurting the frame. Any ideas would be great.
    They are the AL and not steel bolts correct? If so Id get a hex wrench that fits pretty snug the full depth and use some type of a lever bar. There is some oem loctite on the bolts so once they break free the should back out fairly ez. I know on my SJ they were very tuff to break and the first hex wrench I used had rounded corners and when I wrenched on it the AL bolt started to deform a bit. I went to the auto store and got a neew square cut wrench and it worked w/o defroming the bolt.

    If this doesnt work you maybe in bad shape because there is no nut, or so there isnt on my SJ or Enduro, the bolt taps directly into the chainstay. Drilling the bolts to the point of removing them would surely damage the chain stay.

    wayne
    89 Univega HT -???-
    92 Specd SJ HT M2 -stolen-
    92 Specd SJ HT M2 -sold-
    94 Specd SJ HT M2 -sold-
    97 Klien Mantra -sold-
    01 Specd enduro FSR
    02 Specd enduro FSR -sold-
    04 Specd stumpjumper FSR
    05 Specd enduro FSR Sworks

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by grabau
    What do you do if your dropout pivot bolts are seized, and I mean they WILL NOT BUDGE? Should I start to drill? They are on a 03 S-Works Epic so the bolts are hollow, I'm a little afraid of hurting the frame. Any ideas would be great.
    or you could just dump it in your LBS' lap and say change the bearings, seriously if you think your to the point of drilling it Id definatley take it to a mech.

    GL
    wayne
    89 Univega HT -???-
    92 Specd SJ HT M2 -stolen-
    92 Specd SJ HT M2 -sold-
    94 Specd SJ HT M2 -sold-
    97 Klien Mantra -sold-
    01 Specd enduro FSR
    02 Specd enduro FSR -sold-
    04 Specd stumpjumper FSR
    05 Specd enduro FSR Sworks

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by grabau
    What do you do if your dropout pivot bolts are seized, and I mean they WILL NOT BUDGE? Should I start to drill? They are on a 03 S-Works Epic so the bolts are hollow, I'm a little afraid of hurting the frame. Any ideas would be great.
    Before you DRILL try some amonia:

    this is a tip from Sheldon Brown about stuck aluminum seaposts but it will work for aluminum bolts too-

    Aluminum seatposts frequently become stuck by corrosion also, and penetrating oil is almost useless against aluminum oxide. Fortunately, aluminum oxide can be dissolved like magic by using ammonia.

    I used som PB Blaster to help free up my stuck bearings while removing them. (that was a steel bearing race to aluminum frame- dry and stuck from years of neglect.)

    Or if you have a bolt kit so you know you can replace the bolt : I wrung out the center of one of my hex bolts on the shock linkage. I was able to just grab the edge of the bolt with vice grips - this will surely trash the bolt and must be done VERY carefully so as not to scrape the frame as you turn the bolt. That provided plenty of leverage to turn the bolt free.
    Last edited by cbchess; 01-30-2007 at 07:03 AM.
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  35. #35
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    Found a way to remove bearing race from seat stay/horst

    I found a way to remove the bearing race that remains in the seat stay shell when the bearings fall apart. This is on my 03 stumpjumper. I hope the cell phone pictures work.

    There seemed to be a slight gap between the back of the bearing race and the lip. I tried getting a screw driver in there, but it didn't help. I then dug through my spare screw jar and found three screws with beveled heads that might fit behind the bearing race. I insterted the screw heads one at a time and then clamped the shafts together. This worked like magic, it expanded behind the race and I was able to pull the race out easily. Oh and I soaked it overnight in WD-40 which may have helped.

    Click for larger image:





    Last edited by jo_ride; 03-05-2007 at 10:45 AM.

  36. #36
    ...idios...
    Reputation: SteveUK's Avatar
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    jo_ride,

    Please check your PM's...

  37. #37
    Long Distance MTB
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    Thank you very much

    Thank you very much everybody, I may use this soon.

  38. #38
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    If you have a mig welder find a steel nut that fits inside the outer race and spot weld in a couple of places then get some threaded rod and screw into the nut find some thing like a spark plug socket slide onto rod put a nut /washer on use socket as a slide hammer this will get the old bearing shell out with minimum damage.

  39. #39
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    Oh so tagged as I just tried to remove my bearings today.

    Will try again soon as I found one of my drop out bearings is fried.

  40. #40
    ryanmtnman
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    Gack...I'm struggling to find anyone that knows the specific bearing sizes for stumpjumpers from 07...any of you guys know?

  41. #41
    since 4/10/2009
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    Old thread dredge...but I had some info to add.

    I was replacing the pivot bearings on my 03 SJ FSR this weekend. I have had this done in the past a couple times, but always paid a mech. I was determined to do it myself this time, but don't have the cash to pony up for a good bearing press, so I tried the above method.

    It didn't really work out so well for me. I used some all thread, sockets, washers, and nuts and I was able to press out the 6000 bearings in the main pivot near the bb just fine. When it came to the others, though...meh. I was able to get the bearings out of the linkage by using a teeny weeny 3" M5 bolt, but after that, the threads were just completely mangled from the pressing. I was going to just head into the shop where I work and use the bearing presses there, but my dad suggested using a c-clamp with the sockets to press out the other bearings.

    That did the trick. The c-clamp was heavy as $hit and very difficult to handle with precision myself, but being deliberate and patient with my work I was able to press all the other bearings out and press the new Enduro Max bearings in without a hitch. My rear suspension feels like new now.

    Now to replace those worn chainrings.

  42. #42
    old fart
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    Given that you are replacing the old bearings then you should just drive them out using a metal drift/punch. Support the frame on wooden blocks each side of the bearing hole and use a BFH to puch out the bearing. If you are anal like me, get a wooden block and drill a 15mm hole in the middle and use this to support the frame.

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