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  1. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete N View Post
    Jathanas
    Interesting to see that you are back on a 29er Epic. I personally feel that the 13 brain is better than the previous ones so will be interested to hear your thoughts. The black/black has grown on me after initially not being too keen.
    I'm pleased I took your advice on the 29er SW HT and really enjoy that too. They really ride quite differently but I like both equally.
    G'day Pete!

    Stay tuned for more. I've ridden it for 40 minutes in total, so a full report might be premature.

    One of the things I'll do differently this time is that this will be the only bike I take off-road. Last time I had 3 XC bikes, and it was too difficult to adjust to the 29er dually. This time around, I'll riding the Epic regardless of the race or terrain.

    Glad you're loving the Stumpy mate, it's a rocket. You've got to be fit to take that wild horse through the rough terrain.

    J

  2. #152
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    I've had the bike for a week now and have already completed an MTB event with it.

    I very much like the simplified suspension set-up process. Getting the rear shock dialled was so fast and easy, the fork was a bit more tricky. I initially went with the recommended PSI for my weight and the fork felt really rough. I had to drop the pressure by about 15-20 PSI to get the proper sag! Who comes up with these ranges?

    On Sunday I rode an event which was staged on a very, very tough course. The first descent was pure carnage with loose sharp rock littered over a thick layer of dust. There were ripped sidewalls everywhere you looked. The Epic 29er just soldiered on, and gave me a real sense of confidence. At that point the strength of the 29er dually became clear to me, and I felt sorry for the 26ers and HT riders on the day. They were bouncing around like anything.

    The course led to a twisty technical climb that goes for about 7km. It's very slow, with dark soil and baby-head rocks everywhere. The continuous switchbacks were a challenge for the 29er dually but I had no more problems navigating this section than the other riders on 26ers. This will just take practice and better body language.

    Even the fireroad climbs were slippery, but the Epic with the standard Fast Traks front and rear (control casing for the rear) did the job beautifully.

    Bottom line: I bonded with my machine during this hell-ride, and honestly felt that I was riding the best XC bike in the world. I so look forward to racing this machine in the months to come.

    Cheers, J

  3. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by jathanas View Post
    I've had the bike for a week now and have already completed an MTB event with it.
    The bike looks good.

    What does the decal on your top tube say? I can't quite make it out from the photos.

  4. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    The bike looks good.

    What does the decal on your top tube say? I can't quite make it out from the photos.
    Thanks WR. The decal has the name of the shop that sold it to me: "The Fitzroy Revolution".

  5. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by jathanas View Post
    The course led to a twisty technical climb that goes for about 7km. It's very slow, with dark soil and baby-head rocks everywhere. The continuous switchbacks were a challenge for the 29er dually but I had no more problems navigating this section than the other riders on 26ers. This will just take practice and better body language.

    Even the fireroad climbs were slippery, but the Epic with the standard Fast Traks front and rear (control casing for the rear) did the job beautifully.
    I'm not a fan of Specialized Fast Trak tyres. In any sort of mud they clog and don't clear very well.

    Have you tried Specialized Ground Control tyres (front and rear)? I think those tyres are a good all round fit with a Specialized Epic 29er, increasing its ability to plow through obstacles whilst offering significantly more cornering and braking grip than the Fast Traks do in mixed conditions. In typical Cotswold riding conditions the Ground Control tyres are much quicker than Fast Trak tyres in most situations, especially if its a bit muddy.

    MTB power meter thread.

    Despite quite an aggressive tread pattern the Ground Control tyres roll well enough that the Fast Trak tyres don't redeem themselves with a noticeable speed advantage on hardpack, gravel or even tarmac either.



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  6. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by jathanas View Post
    I very much like the simplified suspension set-up process. Getting the rear shock dialled was so fast and easy, the fork was a bit more tricky. I initially went with the recommended PSI for my weight and the fork felt really rough. I had to drop the pressure by about 15-20 PSI to get the proper sag! Who comes up with these ranges?
    i had the same exact thing with the fork pressure. thought maybe i was doing something wrong cause it was like a rock with the pressure they recommended but dropped it down to 90 for my 170lb frame and all is good.

  7. #157
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    Thanks for the great post on tires WR.

    I've no doubt that the Fast Trak 29 x 2.0 would not be a great choice for any muddy course. For cornering and braking I've found them to be perfectly adequate, but not outstanding, for Aussie loose-over-hardpack summer conditions.

    I'll surely be keeping the Ground Control in mind for the coming winter season, especially as a front tire.

    That rolling resistance chart is a gem!

  8. #158
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    Epic S-Works 2013

    That's what I thought initially about the Ground Control tyres too - a mud/ winter tyre that would be compromised in the dry by its relatively tall tread blocks.

    I actually ended up using them for everything last year. I just had a lot more confidence in the Ground Control tyres on my Epic than the Fast Traks everywhere, even on bone dry dust and gravel. On total hardpack or tarmac (no layer of dust on top) the rounded profile of the Fast Trak is a little better for cornering when you lean the bike over. The benefit of the Ground Control tyre in the dry however is that if you're riding along on hardpack and you hit a deep patch of sand or gravel (for example) there's hardly any squirrelling around. You just keep pedalling in a straight line without it breaking your concentration or rhythm.

    I ran old style Fast Trak 26x2.0” tyres for most of Spring/ Summer 2011 offroad, switching to 26x2.1" Ground Control tyres for winter 2011/ early 2012 on my 26" Epic. When I got the Epic 29er I started off on the stock tyres but after a month had had enough of them and fitted 29x2.1" Ground Controls on that too. It made a big difference to how well I felt the bike performed.

  9. #159
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    Epic S-Works 2013-s-works.jpg
    My Baby

  10. #160
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    Please load up a few more pics. Nice ride btw.

  11. #161
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    Good to hear that you're liking the Epic so far. I've just spent the weekend riding in The Peak District which is very rocky. The bike continues to perform flawlessly.
    I'm with WR304 on the tyres. I really like the Ground Controls for winter riding front and back. For Spring/Summer I ride Fast Trak rear and Ground Control front.

  12. #162
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    I've just got my S-Works Epic and it's a dream! But I have a few questions and problems...

    First, surprised that getting the bike of all bikes, with Bliss ready Carbon Roval wheels, and even a set of tubeless valves in the packing, and yet no blue tubeless tape? Even the standard tape on the wheels says "Bliss Ready" all over it! It's a minor thing, but still gonna take me a while to sort out; and gotta get some blue tape from the dealer (Unless Stan's is preferred?) And extra frustrating because my first ride out I had two rear wheel flats!

    Plus there's no extra derailer hanger? I thought sure it would come with an extra...

    Second is a more major issue. It's a long story but the bike has been waiting for me for a while and when I got back into town I immediately switched the XTR to XX1. But I have a problem with the crank. It was a Specialized XX crank that came off it, and I'm wondering if the setup of the Pressfit bearings is different for that crank, because I could not the the XX1 crank to seat properly. First, there was a large spacer of some kind inside the BB cups, and as I tapped the spindle through, it pushed out the pressfit bearing from the cup on the driveside.

    Epic S-Works 2013-spacer-thing.jpg

    I left whatever that spacer is on (see picture), and tapped it all together, but no matter how much I tighten the 10mm retaining bolt the crank won't fully seat. We used a torque wrench and attempted to get it to the proper 400+inch pounds (forget exactly what) and still wouldn't seat, and a little plastic adjustable spindle spacer on the non-drive side broke off.

    Funny thing is once I took another larger spindle spacer off the drive side I was able to seat the crank no problem, and I've been riding on it. It does not move and feels fine, but it means the little bearing covers are also not being seated atop the bearings right, and probably the chainline is not perfect.

    So something was making it all too wide and I'm thinking that the little bearing covers that came with the XX are actually a tiny bit too wide and I need different ones for XX1? Or that metal looking spacer thing in the middle of the BB cups needs to come out entirely? Any ideas? Or should I be contacting SRAM?

  13. #163
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    Sorry, I don`t understand your problem. Is your XX-Crank GXP or BB30? by the way - why don't you just buy a XX1-Spider from Speci for your S-Works crankset? It is the lightest and easiest way.

  14. #164
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    It's BB30. And no idea I could jsut buy the spider? I was hoping to sell the XTR as a group too..

    Can I just take the spider off this one and put it on the XX crank? And then I guess put the 2x spider on the XX1 crank?

  15. #165
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    The last thing i would do is sell the S-Works crank. There is a XX1-Spider avilable directly from Specialized. Just visit your dealer, he should be able to dismount the XX-Spider and mount the XX1-Spider.

    Regarding your XX1-crank - i think its spider is not removable or if it is it will not fit the s-works crank. Also the XX 2x spider which now is mounted at your s-works crankset will not fit the XX1-crank.

    My suggestion is to visit your shop, buy a specialized XX1-spider for s-works crankset and let the shop change it. Then sell your XX1-crank and the 2sp spider.

  16. #166
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    Epic S-Works 2013

    I'm unclear what combination of bottom bracket spacers you're using at the moment?

    My suggestion would be to remove the Specialized bottom bracket from the frame entirely, fit a Sram PF30 bottom bracket and use the Sram XX1 chainset plus the recommended spacers with that. That should sort out any compatibility issues. For a Specialized Epic 29er you'd use the 73mm width spacer layout in the Sram manual below.

    Sram XX1 Bottom Bracket
    http://cdn.sram.com/cdn/farfuture/Yp...ifications.pdf

    Sram XX1 Chainset
    http://cdn.sram.com/cdn/farfuture/Ab..._cranksets.pdf

    Specialized PF30 Bottom Bracket
    http://service.specialized.com/colla...G0401_revC.pdf

    Specialized MTB Carbon Chainset
    http://service.specialized.com/colla...G0276_revF.pdf

    Alternatively, change the spider on your S-Works cranks for the XX1 version.

  17. #167
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    If your bike is a 2013 the rim tape isn't blue. I have the XTR version and the rim tape was brown. It mounted tubeless fine without any other tape.

  18. #168
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    Epic S-Works 2013

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete N View Post
    Good to hear that you're liking the Epic so far. I've just spent the weekend riding in The Peak District which is very rocky. The bike continues to perform flawlessly.
    I'm with WR304 on the tyres. I really like the Ground Controls for winter riding front and back. For Spring/Summer I ride Fast Trak rear and Ground Control front.
    I usually prefer having a matched pair of tyres, rather than front and rear specific tyres or different types of tyre front and rear. The reason being that running the same tyre tread pattern on both wheels gives a consistent handling feel for each end of the bike when cornering.

    When you're cornering on loose surfaces and the tyres begin to drift sideways having matched cornering knobs on both tyres keeps that slipping fairly even. If both front and rear tyres are sliding evenly, followed by regaining traction evenly, then that's controllable, predictable and you can recover from it.

    When you have mixed tread patterns it changes the handling balance. If you go into the same corner, start sliding, but one tyre has more traction than the other tyre then it isn't as easy to control. Either the front is going to be pushing wide or the rear will be trying to come round on you, requiring more rider input to stay upright.

    A good example would be last year. I was on a downhill corner on fairly deep gravel. The corner was quite long and tightened as you reached the apex. As I turned the bike tighter the front end lost traction in the gravel and both front and rear tyres began drifting sideways. I was leaning more and more bodyweight on the front to try and regain some grip until eventually the bike straightened up and I managed to ride it out. With matched front and rear tyres it just makes it that bit easier to do.

  19. #169
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    Thanks, I wish I'd posted before I attempted this! It seems pretty staightforward at the time!

    So one other thing, the mount for the Front Derailer, is that special to Specialized? There was an extra little piece, small allen bolts and a spacer or two I guess for adjustment. I just took it all off, but I'm wondering if the Derailer is a standard or whether that was custom for Specialized? And I'm wonder if I just leave those holes exposes. It's no biggie and can't be seen, but it's also probably not how the XX1 bike comes.

  20. #170
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    The direct mount front derailleur itself isn't specific to Specialized. Quite a lot of mountain bikes use them now. There are different versions for different frames however, along with chainring size specific models so it's always worth checking which one is needed.

    http://cdn.sram.com/cdn/farfuture/Ig...eur-review.pdf

    There shouldn't be a problem removing the hardware from your frame but it's probably worth keeping in case you ever want to go back to double chainrings again. If you wanted to then you can get chain guides that will attach to that mounting point for extra chain retension also.

  21. #171
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    I'm not a fan of Specialized Fast Trak tyres. In any sort of mud they clog and don't clear very well.

    Have you tried Specialized Ground Control tyres (front and rear)? I think those tyres are a good all round fit with a Specialized Epic 29er, increasing its ability to plow through obstacles whilst offering significantly more cornering and braking grip than the Fast Traks do in mixed conditions. In typical Cotswold riding conditions the Ground Control tyres are much quicker than Fast Trak tyres in most situations, especially if its a bit muddy.

    MTB power meter thread.

    Despite quite an aggressive tread pattern the Ground Control tyres roll well enough that the Fast Trak tyres don't redeem themselves with a noticeable speed advantage on hardpack, gravel or even tarmac either.



    .
    I love the fact that WR304 backs up most of his posts with actual data. Scary actually. Although one day he'll learn to spell "tire" correctly.

  22. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by thegallery View Post
    First, surprised that getting the bike of all bikes, with Bliss ready Carbon Roval wheels, and even a set of tubeless valves in the packing, and yet no blue tubeless tape? Even the standard tape on the wheels says "Bliss Ready" all over it! It's a minor thing, but still gonna take me a while to sort out; and gotta get some blue tape from the dealer (Unless Stan's is preferred?) And extra frustrating because my first ride out I had two rear wheel flats!
    That tape is fine for tubleless / you have nothing to sort out. Stamping 2Bliss Ready all over the tape is Spec's way of trying to tell you that it's tubeless ready tape

  23. #173
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    Hope

    Quote Originally Posted by phlegm View Post
    I love the fact that WR304 backs up most of his posts with actual data. Scary actually. Although one day he'll learn to spell "tire" correctly.
    He is the master of the Internet search, I don't know how he finds it. He spells TYRE just perfectly. He also spells COLOUR correctly as well

  24. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete N View Post
    He is the master of the Internet search, I don't know how he finds it. He spells TYRE just perfectly. He also spells COLOUR correctly as well
    Agree with "colour", but still disagree with "tyre". Hmm, what country could I be from?

  25. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete N View Post
    He is the master of the Internet search, I don't know how he finds it. He spells TYRE just perfectly. He also spells COLOUR correctly as well
    Oh, and what's really scary is that the data is actually his - not from the Interwebs.

  26. #176
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    Having different spellings between US and UK English for words is hard work sometimes, especially on an international forum. Half the time I just use the US spellings for words (such as sulfur instead of sulphur) because it matches adjacent posts and any links.

    How to speed up recovery process for broken bones?


    In that tyre rolling resistance chart the Fast Trak tyres are the new style model featuring the herringbone centre tread. The older Fast Trak LK version was supposed to have a higher rolling resistance.

    If you're trying to find old posts or content online you have to experiment with the keywords. Trying a few small variations of a phrase in Google will often produce different results. Even though the first search may not work minor changes and persistence can be enough to find what you're after. If you do see useful online links make a note whilst you remember what they are. Trying to find them again after a few months is much harder to do. If you see a PDF that could be handy save it to your computer, as you never know if it will be there when you need it in future.

  27. #177
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    My 2013 S Works Sram with Fast Trak Control 2.0 front and Renegade Control 1.9 rear. Weight with 2oz of Stan's per tire. Did a few rides so far and between the Brain, Magura brakes and XX1 it's perfection.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Epic S-Works 2013-epic.jpg  

    Epic S-Works 2013-epic1.jpg  

    Epic S-Works 2013-rep3.jpg  


  28. #178
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    The direct mount front derailleur itself isn't specific to Specialized. Quite a lot of mountain bikes use them now. There are different versions for different frames however, along with chainring size specific models so it's always worth checking which one is needed.
    Cool thanks, that direct mount is differnt to the one I have on my Lurcher; totally differnt place really, but I guess it's different brackets then.

    Also, fixed crank. I kept the XX1 on there, and as I thought, the spacer inside was not meant to be there, and the end caps for the bearings are different. I'm not sure how many grams I would have saved by ordering a spider for the S-Works crank but I'll live with the XX1.

    Alas, another problem:

    My new fork seems to be loosing a bit of air (but not much), and is bottoming out. And when I put more air in it now it's not expanding all the way. Any ideas? Are the seals blown or something else I need to do? It's a positive air only I think; they're calling it "solo air".

    It's a "Custom RockShox SID World Cup 29 fork with Specialized Brain inertia-valve damping and carbon steerer tube" .

    It worked really great for a couple days!

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  29. #179
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    There are lots of variants of the direct mount front derailleur. The On One Lurcher looks like it uses a high mount top pull direct mount front derailleur.

    You can have either High or Low Mount direct mount options, each type then comes with either top or bottom pull cable actions. For SRAM each individual variant of their front derailleur then has multiple further choices depending upon the chainring size...It's easy to get confused.

    http://www.sram.com/sites/default/fi...76_-_rev_e.pdf

    The Rock Shox Solo Air fork losing travel problem sounds a lot like this thread:

    2013 Specialized Epic 29er Small Fork Length

    I think your fork is going to need stripping down and the air chamber leg of the fork servicing, along with some new seals being fitted. The issue is with the Rock Shox part of the fork, rather than the Specialized Brain damper, so at least it should hopefully be fixable without needing to send your fork off for three weeks to be repaired. As the bike is so new that ought to be done under warranty.

    Edit: This is a slightly edited version of my main post on losing Rock Shox fork travel from the thread linked above:

    Inside a Rock Shox Sid 29 fork you have two air chambers, divided by an internal seal. With a Dual Air fork each chamber's pressure is set individually. With a Solo Air fork it's supposed to automatically equalise the pressure between chambers:

    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/0Gsqjmui-hQ?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    With the previous Rock Shox Sid 29 Dual Air fork if there was too much air in the negative air chamber you'd lose some fork travel and it would bottom out easily. With excess pressure in the negative air chamber the amount of exposed stanchion at rest would be less than 100mm as the stanchions were pulled down into the fork.

    The Rock Shox Sid 29 Dual Air forks have two pressure valves (one in the top for the positive chamber and one in the bottom of the fork leg for the negative chamber) so it's easy to check and adjust individual air chamber pressure on those forks.

    If the pressure in the negative chamber ends up being too high then you end up with the fork losing travel. This picture is of my 2012 Rock Shox Sid 29 Dual Air fork last year:



    If you look at the sag markings on the fork stanchion you can see how the fork wiper is alongside the black 10% sag marking, meaning the fork has lost 10mm or so of its 100mm travel. The unloaded fork ought to have more stanchion showing. On my fork it was caused by a slow leak of air from the positive chamber into the negative chambers. Over time I'd lose more and more fork travel. This was fixed in the short term by letting the air out and resetting the pressures of both chambers.

    The 2013 Rock Shox Sid 29 Solo Air forks only have a single valve. I'd try letting all the air out that you can, cycle the fork through its travel by hand a few times, try letting any more air out, cycle the fork again and then pump it back up to your normal fork pressure to see if that fixes it. By letting all the air out of your Solo Air Rock Shox Sid 29 fork, and then cycling it by hand, you're trying to reset the two air chambers to their default equalised setting. It's straightforward to try as a short term fix but may not be successful.
    Last edited by WR304; 03-18-2013 at 10:54 AM.

  30. #180
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    Enjoyed the ride tonight with mine.

    Epic S-Works 2013-8611366663_2491e5a143_c.jpg

    Full size image:
    http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8534/8...bf45bcf1_k.jpg

  31. #181
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    Lovely pic bud!

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    Hey, thegallery your brake hose is routed incorrectly. It should be on the inside of the fork leg. Safety first! While your at it make sure to torque all bolts to spec on your entire bike.

  33. #183
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    Here is mine, it looks a bit different now, another stem an ritchey WCS pedals. 9,75 kg on the picture, the goal is under 9,5 with real tires, wide bar and so on. The seatpost and handlebar will be custom made (by myself) so it will be matte to match the rest of the bike
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Epic S-Works 2013-l1000973.jpg  


  34. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by vfb View Post
    Here is mine, it looks a bit different now, another stem an ritchey WCS pedals. 9,75 kg on the picture, the goal is under 9,5 with real tires, wide bar and so on. The seatpost and handlebar will be custom made (by myself) so it will be matte to match the rest of the bike
    Specs please.
    MCH Co-Captain

  35. #185
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    Of course sorry

    Epic s-works frame size L red KCNC alloy bolts for the cabel holder
    Red carbon ti seatclamp
    Fox float 29 15mm ctd fork
    Roval control SL wheels
    s-works crankset with xx spider and 32tooth ta chainring ceramic bottom bracket red KCNC chainring bolts
    Specialized chainguide with Red KCNC and carbon-ti alu bolts
    Xo gribshift silver red alloy bolt in the grip
    XO silver med cage rear der tuned with ceramicspeed pulleys and carbon ti red alloy bolts
    XX 11-36 cassette and xx chain
    Formula R1R brakes Red alu bolts in the brake lever ti for the caliper
    Xx disks 160-140mm
    Ritchey superlogic seatpost
    ROmin Pro saddle
    Syntace f109 stem with ti bolts
    Syntace vertor high10 740mm bar
    Ritchey wcs paradiagram V5 pedals
    Maxxis beaver 3EXC front tire
    Renegade s-works in the rear
    Geax latex tubes
    Zee cage bottle cage
    FULL alloy-TI bolt kit!

    Today after putting oil in the fork(offen new forks come with nearly any oil in them), trim the stertube and mounting my syntace stem, and another sticker for the downtube than the awful s-works sticker. It weights in at excactly 9,76 KG ready to ride

    Future
    XX1 spider and chainring
    X0 T2 short cage rear der
    So i can get away with the chain guide
    Eclipse tubes
    Fox RP23 CTD shock
    Tune 15mm axel for the front and 12mm for the rear

    Right now, i just want to go ride it along with my stumpjumper HT and then build up my new project black roubaix road bike.
    I will see if i can take some more pictures soon

  36. #186
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    Question on the XTR race brakes.

    Mine are great, I like the pads it came with was some Titanium version; which I had the shop reorder. They lasted 1000 miles through the worst races in mud. In the meantime I have some resin pads which seem to fair well too.

    However, understanding that there is a reach adjustment, there seems to be a lot of movement before the brakes engage. I'm not sure if this is called the 'float', which I understand does not have adjustment on the Race version? So it moves like a full 1cm before it begins to engage.

    Perhaps my brakes just need bleeding? They are not mushy, but they are starting to bottom out, at least on the side I have the twist grip which sticks out pretty far. I don't want to change the reach, they are plenty far out, I just want them to engage sooner. Is there an adjustment for that anywhere? I've only bled brakes before when they were mushy, and these aren't mushy; they engage great after the 'float'

    Followup. I've had no more problems with the fork, however the brain function does not seem to work anything like the brain on the rear shock. Is this by design? The fork is great, but turning up the 'brain' just seems to turn up the compression. It doesn't 'lock' it out at any point except at full turn. Meanwhile the rear shock does indeed to seem to ride like a hardtail until you hit something, and the adjustment makes it more or less sensitive. the fork on the other hand only rides like a rigid when it's fully turned, so I'm not sure if I'm missing something in my brain ha ha I don't stand up and ride too much, but when I do I was expecting it to behave more like the rear does.

    A linkage bolt came undone one time in a race, and I didn't notice the bolt almost sticking out out until the end. Specialized replaced...

    I also do not like the new tubeless rim strip. Personally the non-stick tubless rim strip I think is a failure. It seems like it would work and does hold air, but I change tires on average 2x per week. I'd go tubless and just hear leaking air for a bit but no sign of where. Once set I'm not noticeably losing air, (though some times I'd have a flat in the morning.) But either way often I'd take the tires off in a given week an there'd be no sealant left! I have a feeling I've now got about a bottle of Stans' leaked into the fancy carbon wheelset! So I re-taped; Stan's Yellow did not stick, so I ran a layer of electrical tape under the stans tape. This worked great, and allows all tires to seal up super easy. On top of that, since I've made the change, I open take off the tire and all the sealant is still floating around.

    Seriously, it might be dried up, but I think I got a ton of sealant in those rims and I don't know what to do about it. I reckon I'm not the only one and I'm not sure how to address Specialized on it.

  37. #187
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    Quote Originally Posted by thegallery View Post
    Question on the XTR race brakes.



    Followup. I've had no more problems with the fork, however the brain function does not seem to work anything like the brain on the rear shock. Is this by design? The fork is great, but turning up the 'brain' just seems to turn up the compression. It doesn't 'lock' it out at any point except at full turn. Meanwhile the rear shock does indeed to seem to ride like a hardtail until you hit something, and the adjustment makes it more or less sensitive. the fork on the other hand only rides like a rigid when it's fully turned, so I'm not sure if I'm missing something in my brain ha ha I don't stand up and ride too much, but when I do I was expecting it to behave more like the rear does.

    .
    That´s the way the fork works. I was surprised as well as the Brain performs differently from the rear shock. But even when the fork is completely in firm mode, it still feels great when you hit a bump as it opens immediately. Great stuff.

    @VFB

    Hey so you changed your old black/blue/orrange S-Works? Nice ride!

  38. #188
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    Dirkinho
    Yes, after i recieved the fork and the wheels i decided that it was more easy to change the frame than getting the wheels and rims painted. Also the rear shock was about to be worn out, and i decided that it was stupid to get things painted to put them on a cracked frame. The rear shock works way better than on the old frame.

    But this one i just another boring s-works, the old one was something special this just reminds me of another box bike... Anyways i am getting a new frame again, again, again the new one have two cracks in the paint, and i asked to get the white one (just to try something new :-)) but that one was sold out, so i get the same frame again. I have cracked 2 frames and it was exactly one year ago i rode the first frame for the first time the second one cracked. But i knew this was going to happen as all of the carbon bikes i have owned has cracked before their one year birthday. Guess i am a little tuff on my bikes :-)

  39. #189
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    Hi Guys,

    I just picked up a new 2013 S-works Epic XTR from my local bike shop. This is my third S-works full suspension bike since 2007. I have never had an Epic or a 29er, so this feels like a rocket compared to the older versions.

    So, now that most of you have had the bike for a good amount of time, besides going tubeless, where is the weight to be lost at? I've traditionally swapped out rotors, bolts to ti, and lighter tires. There just doesn't seem to be much left for going "light" and still have the rideability still retained.

    Thanks,

    Rob

  40. #190
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    Quote Originally Posted by crewcabrob View Post
    So, now that most of you have had the bike for a good amount of time, besides going tubeless, where is the weight to be lost at? I've traditionally swapped out rotors, bolts to ti, and lighter tires. There just doesn't seem to be much left for going "light" and still have the rideability still retained.

    Rob
    Diet.

  41. #191
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    Epic S-Works 2013

    Some easy places to lose weight would be by replacing the seatpost, saddle, chainstay protector and grips.

  42. #192
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    Quote Originally Posted by skiwi View Post
    Diet.
    seriously, losing even a 100g will cost several $100, and would make very little difference to any race time you could envisage. Particularly if you are a heavier >80kgs) rider. Certainly well less than 1%...

    A scientific study I saw with a 100kg rider going up a hill of constant gradient and no significant terrain difficulty measured a 20sec difference in times, over an elapsed time of 650sec between the same rider on a 8kg bike vs the same rider on a 10 kg bike. That is 0.15%/100gms improvement. For a 70kg rider, the difference was 30sec.

    I know that the bike industry is build on the bed-rock of "light is good", but it really doesn't stand up under any sort of solid scientific analysis...

  43. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by skiwi View Post
    seriously, losing even a 100g will cost several $100, and would make very little difference to any race time you could envisage. Particularly if you are a heavier >80kgs) rider. Certainly well less than 1%...

    A scientific study I saw with a 100kg rider going up a hill of constant gradient and no significant terrain difficulty measured a 20sec difference in times, over an elapsed time of 650sec between the same rider on a 8kg bike vs the same rider on a 10 kg bike. That is 0.15%/100gms improvement. For a 70kg rider, the difference was 30sec.

    I know that the bike industry is build on the bed-rock of "light is good", but it really doesn't stand up under any sort of solid scientific analysis...
    That would stand up if we only rode in 10 minute bursts on non difficult terrain. When I ride, it is for hours on technical terrain. I feel every lb difference.
    '14 Marin Attack Trail C-XT9
    '08 Monocog 29 SS-Stolen
    '13 Marin MV XM7-Stolen

  44. #194
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    ...
    Last edited by skiwi; 06-07-2013 at 11:25 PM.

  45. #195
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    Quote Originally Posted by moefosho View Post
    That would stand up if we only rode in 10 minute bursts on non difficult terrain. When I ride, it is for hours on technical terrain. I feel every lb difference.
    I understand the emotion, but the science disagrees. Rider fitness and technique are far far more important.

  46. #196
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    I'd like to see the study if you can still find it.

    I'd like to know more details on the methodology as well. I'm curious if the weight difference becomes more of a benefit as one gets more tired. For example, if they send the test rider up the hill "fresh" (first run of the day), I would agree that weight difference could/should result in a minimal time change.

    But what happens if they have the rider repeat the climb multiple times? Does the lighter bike slowly gain additional time advantage?

    Just curious - maybe just trying to justify my parts purchases.

  47. #197
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    New epic SW 2013 again

    I moved the parts across to my new frame, chanced the sticker on the down tube to a white/black specialized sticker to match the fox fork. Put on red ESI grips and a white cable for the derralieur. The new frame was 20grams lighter, but still 20 grams heavier compared to my 2012 epic ltd frame. Thinking about a command or reverb adjustable seat post even tough it would add 3-400 grams. The weight is 9,76 with latex tubes and a setup that is reliable which is important to me.

    build list:
    Epic s-works frame size L red KCNC alloy bolts for the cabel holder
    Red carbon ti seatclamp
    Fox float 29 15mm ctd fork
    Roval control SL wheels
    s-works crankset with xx spider and 32tooth ta chainring ceramic bottom bracket red KCNC chainring bolts
    Specialized chainguide with Red KCNC and carbon-ti alu bolts
    Xo gribshift silver red alloy bolt in the grip
    XO silver med cage rear der tuned with ceramicspeed pulleys and carbon ti red alloy bolts
    XX 11-36 cassette and xx chain
    Formula R1R brakes Red alu bolts in the brake lever ti for the caliper
    Xx disks 160-140mm
    Ritchey superlogic seatpost
    ROmin Pro saddle
    Syntace f109 stem with ti bolts
    Syntace vertor high10 740mm bar
    Ritchey wcs paradiagram V5 pedals
    Maxxis beaver 3EXC front tire
    Renegade s-works in the rear
    Geax latex tubes
    Zee cage bottle cage
    FULL alloy-TI bolt kit!

    Future
    XX1 spider and chainring
    X0 T2 short cage rear der
    So i can get away with the chain guide
    Eclipse tubes
    Fox RP23 CTD shock
    Tune 15mm axel for the front and 12mm for the rear
    Mabye a dropper post
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Epic S-Works 2013-l1000990.jpg  

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    Epic S-Works 2013-l1010015.jpg  

    Epic S-Works 2013-l1010018.jpg  

    Epic S-Works 2013-l1010020.jpg  

    Epic S-Works 2013-l1010021.jpg  


  48. #198
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    Quote Originally Posted by phlegm View Post
    I'd like to see the study if you can still find it.
    IIRC, it was published in the Journal of Sports Sciences. I'll see if I can dig it out...

  49. #199
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    Epic S-Works 2013

    These are vfb's photos rotated so that you can admire the effort he's put into his bike.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Epic S-Works 2013-vfb_2013_epic_1.jpg  

    Epic S-Works 2013-vfb_2013_epic_6.jpg  

    Epic S-Works 2013-vfb_2013_epic_3.jpg  

    Epic S-Works 2013-vfb_2013_epic_8.jpg  

    Epic S-Works 2013-vfb_2013_epic_4.jpg  

    Epic S-Works 2013-vfb_2013_epic_7.jpg  

    Epic S-Works 2013-vfb_2013_epic_5.jpg  

    Epic S-Works 2013-vfb_2013_epic_2.jpg  


  50. #200
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    Thank you!

    I was a bit in a hurry, when i uploaded the pictures

    hopefully i can try the new beast in this week, time will tell. Even tough i don`t expect it to be much different from my other epics. I haven`t spend much time on my epic lately, started to ride my SJ HT again after a little time on the epic and i like being "back" on HT. Also i have road bike that is only one month old, so i also have to ride that. Maybe i just have too many bikes, to chose between?

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