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  1. #1
    Guinness is GOOD for you
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    epic pivot bearing replacement questions

    I am trying to clean and relube or replace the pivot bearings on my 04 epic. The two larger bearings on the seat tube and by the bottom bracket have a bolt going through the bearings that i was wondering how to remove. Should i just hammer it out with a hammer and a block of wood to protect the bolt or should i try to press it out with a clamp or something?

    Also where can i buy cheap bearings? I cant see spending 7 to 10 bucks for one bearing if they need to be replaced every year or so. I found the enduro bearings on the internet but the only place i found them sells them for 7.50 a piece. I also dont know what the diffference between the enduro and the enduro max is.

    The fox shock has spherical bearings that attach it to the rear triangle-should i replace thoes as well? Where can i get thoes too?

  2. #2
    Guinness is GOOD for you
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    i got it

    Nevermind i just got them out with a c clamp and some sockets. I peeled the seals off the bearings--they were completely dry. cleaned and re-greased now they spin fine ill get new ones next time.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by nicoblue
    Nevermind i just got them out with a c clamp and some sockets. I peeled the seals off the bearings--they were completely dry. cleaned and re-greased now they spin fine ill get new ones next time.
    You don't even need to push them out. Disassemble the pivots(s) peel the seals off (one side) and then use an spray (low volatility) non-polar solvent (CRC, WD-40, ect.) while spinning the bearing to clean the old grease/dirt out. Then do a final washout with a light (volatile) solvent like acetone and blow it dry (with compressed air) Apply a good grade of waterproof grease (waterproof automotive greases are cheap, MTB specific greases are (also) good.) The whole thing takes less than an hour. (BTW, you are doing the air sleeve service on the rear shock aren't you???? (it should be done a few times a year, more if you ride in heavy mud, see your fox shock manual)))
    When you reassemble be sure to apply (temp) thread locker and torque the fitting to the specified levels. Do the maintenance once a year (or perhaps twice if you ride in water/mud constantly) and you might not have to ever replace the bearings.
    BTW 7-10 bucks is not unreasonable for a decent bearing, high quality bearings (that size) could go for as much as $40 per bearing(!!!) (you'll take better care of them now ;-)

  4. #4
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    air sleeve maintaince

    Turns out that I did have to remove thoes bolts because the bearings were seated against a lip and I could not get the seal off past the lip. The open seal was on the inside so i could not get to it without removing the bolts. Would have been much easier your way but i think this kind of stuff is fun to do.
    In the fox manual it says to remove the strut before removing the air sleeve. why is this necessary. cant i just pull the sleeve out with the strut still attached. you may not know but i thought i would ask. Thanks for your help.
    "Please leave the room if this will offend you"--Budd Dwyer

  5. #5
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    no your right

    no now that i look you were right i didnt have to remove the bolts but its still fun thanks again
    "Please leave the room if this will offend you"--Budd Dwyer

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by nicoblue
    no now that i look you were right i didnt have to remove the bolts but its still fun thanks again
    On the air sleve: It is a PITA on the Epic (I have done it dozens of times and it never gets much better)
    There are two ways to go after it, shock on or shock off. You will have to remove the nose extension of the shock in either case because the air sleeve won't slide over the large retainer for the spherical bearing (and trying to clean and lube with the air sleeve slid up onto the nose extension it is almost impossible to do a good job) so there isn't really isn't any advantage to removing the shock except to use a soft jaw vise to secure the extension while you use a wrench on the piston to unscrew it (if you do it in the frame use a padded (large) adjustable wrench to hold the nosepiece against the torque of the wrench, DO NOT use the spherical bearing to hold against the wrench it was not designed to take any torque at all (all thrust, that is the point of a spherical coupling) and you could damage it.
    The other PITA that you will run across (unique to the epic) is that when you go to compress the shock slightly (against the nitrogen charged damping circuit) to get the air sleeve in position to be threaded back on the shock you will find that the shock is locked out (ie compression locked) so you can't shove it on and screw it down quickly which is the bench technique on all other fox shocks (that's what it's supposed to do, lock out when it's not moving) So, you will need to put the shock back in the frame and use slow steady pressure (there is a very small (slow) bypass circuit) to compress the shock till you can thread the sleeve back on.
    If there are any specifics you aren't getting I'll go into some more detail (just reply here) and once you get the hang of it it really isn't that bad Check up on Fox's site for a nice instructional video on sleeve service. (though 2-3X the time to service a standard fox float) You will be amazed in the difference of the feel of the shock after a sleeve service (really!)

  7. #7
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    oh no

    when i opened the bearings on the chainstay near rear der they fell out in peices looks like i will have to get some new ones after all. is there any place that you know that i can go to that sells bearings. i am very impatient and dont want to order them online. the weather is supposed to be perfect this weekend and i dont want to miss the riding. i cant believe how bad these were. i think it is because my chainstay protector trapped mud around this pivot.

    i guess i can work on the fox air sleeve while i wait for the bearings if i cant find them locally.
    i really appreciate your help
    thanks again grumpy
    "Please leave the room if this will offend you"--Budd Dwyer

  8. #8
    sadly, like the element
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    No idea where to get the bearing. Regarding the chainstay protector, mine was also trapping large amounts of mud so I just cut it to about a half inch past the cable stop so the pivot is exposed. It's tons cleaner now and I don't have to remove the protector to service the bearings.

    And he's right about the lockout when trying to thread the air sleeve collar back onto the shock body. It's a pita and I almost needed two people to do it. Remount the shock then standing on the opposite side of the bike from the shock with everything reassembled but the sleeve not yet screwed on, rest your chest or abdomen on your seat with as much of your weight on the seat and slowly let the bike compress the shock. After that it's easily threaded on.

  9. #9
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    1 problem down 1 to go

    got the bearings--my shop had some lying around and just gave them to me. thanks Eddys bike shop. but still 1 more problem--the shell of one of the bearings is stuck in the frame but nothing is left in the center to push the shell out. any suggestions? do you think i could find a bolt that fits, screw it into the shell then press both out?
    "Please leave the room if this will offend you"--Budd Dwyer

  10. #10
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    Do a search (in this forum) for the post from the guy who dis-assembled his bearings in place and put them back together. If you can put back in the right amount of balls and get the inner race back in, you can then press it out. If you got one out, use bits-n-pieces from it to put the stuck/broken one back together and then press it out.

  11. #11
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    I posted some time back about this same issue. It is in here somewhere. A guy actually showed how to press them in and out and I swapped all my bearings out using bearings I bought on Ebay...10 bucks for 10 bearings. They work just fine.

    Let me know if you have any other questions. Be glad to help.

  12. #12
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  13. #13
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    Sorry to hear of the bearing self destruction. It can really be a a ***** to remove a race (after a cartridge bearing frags) when the race is lower than the stop step in the seat (as it is in this case)
    A bolt will never work, the race is considerably harder than the bolt (the bolt could never get a grip into the race) You might have to find someone with a short twist easy out set (and pray one of the sizes matches the inner diameter of the outer race) Also, keep the parts warm when you try to extract, the expansion coefficient for aluminum (the frame) is considerably higher than cromo steel (the bearing race) so the grip on the race will losen as things become warmer.

    The last resort (just before "replace the part") is to drill two small holes 180deg apart (with a drill press) from the stepped side (just inside the carrier diameter) to allow you to drive the race out with a small diameter drift (flat) punch.
    Sorry, there is no easy answer here.

  14. #14
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    i got it

    i reassembled the bearing with the pieces from the other bearing(from the other side) and just pressed it out with a socket and a c-clamp. i got it reassembled minutes ago. i cant wait till tomorrow to try it out. thanks for all of your help everyone. ill let you know if this quieted my bike a bit. i cant stand a noisy bike. thanks again
    "Please leave the room if this will offend you"--Budd Dwyer

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by nicoblue
    i reassembled the bearing with the pieces from the other bearing(from the other side) and just pressed it out with a socket and a c-clamp. i got it reassembled minutes ago. i cant wait till tomorrow to try it out. thanks for all of your help everyone. ill let you know if this quieted my bike a bit. i cant stand a noisy bike. thanks again
    Good deal. If your bearings were that far gone you are going to notice a world of difference when you ride it. (particularly combined with a sleeve service) I didn't mention to you (and for other fox air-shock owners) that Slick Honey is THE grease to use for the air sleeve service. (it is also what all the Fox factory wenches use)

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