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  1. #1
    75% Mountain cycle
    Reputation: SanAnMan's Avatar
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    Epic and 130mm travel fork???

    I've look back and done as many searches as I could to try answer my question. I'd like to put a 130mm travel Minute on my '03 Epic. If it's set up as linear as possible, I sag into it about an inch or more on my other bike.

    Has anyone had a 130mm fork on their Epic and are there any pics?

    Thanks, Todd.

  2. #2
    bang
    Reputation: Cyco-Dude's Avatar
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    that would throw the geometry way off; why would you want to do this?

    i do think someone did something like this - put a longer travel dual-crown fork on an epic. i don't see the point

  3. #3
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    Absurd

    I think this is like trying to put an 80mm fork on a Specialized Demo. It just does not make sense...

  4. #4
    Never worng!
    Reputation: Verewolf's Avatar
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    I think you may risk doing damage to the frame which would void the warranty.

  5. #5
    what dont kill still hurt
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    I am contemplating same issue. However Specialize speaks to this in their specs and says 100mm. I am looking at the Marzocchi Marathon XC and the Rock Shox Reba. Both are dial-able and would not throw off the bike's geometry and design, but would allow a little more suspension than the 80mm. The Epic is XC, not AM or FR. I may be stretching it with the Marathon or Reba but don't thnk so. With the 85 to 110mm variance in shock play, the tracking should still be reliable(I am too old to do seriously steep climbs), and I am getting a little more suspension for DH and bigger hits without overrunning the FoxFloat/Brain in the rear.

    Comments?
    What doesn't kill you still hurts.undefinedundefined[SIZE=2]undefined[/SIZE]undefined

  6. #6
    Goathead Gladiator
    Reputation: bwolmarans's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blatido
    I think this is like trying to put an 80mm fork on a Specialized Demo. It just does not make sense...
    I think its a very reasonable question, which deserves a better answer than this. I guess it's hard to understand, and maybe even confusing if you have an xc race bike (like an epic) and ride nothing but xc race terrain ALL the time and never, ever get bored with it. But I think I speak for most riders when I say having a lightweight xc race bike that can also handle the occasional technical steep sections would be a lot of fun.

    So this question makes WAY more sense than putting a sid on a demo, which would be dumb.

  7. #7
    Goathead Gladiator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Verewolf
    I think you may risk doing damage to the frame which would void the warranty.
    If you phone specialized they WILL tell you it voids the warranty.
    But you can put it on, go ahead I would if I wanted to, it would throw the geometry off but that's probably the point, right. It wouldn't screw up the frame unless you think a longer fork will let you do more aggresive riding or you're a clydesdale, in which case being that far back on the stays all the time *might* stress them but I seriously doubt it. But I'm not the company warranteeing your frame for life.

  8. #8
    We want... a shrubbery!
    Reputation: ickyickyptngzutboing's Avatar
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    I don't really understand as well why you would put such a long travel fork on an Epic. I played around with a Psylo on the front of mine while waiting for a SID, and at 115mm (some of that sag) the bike was real squirrly. The bike is made for climbing, and throwing on a fork that large on the front is sure to throw of the geometry... I wouldn't want to ride that thing...


    The only way I would say for it would be if it had the IT travel, but still, why not have a Stumpy instead of the Epic?
    waaahoooooooooooooooooo

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  9. #9
    Team Blindspot
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    Quote Originally Posted by SanAnMan
    I've look back and done as many searches as I could to try answer my question. I'd like to put a 130mm travel Minute on my '03 Epic. If it's set up as linear as possible, I sag into it about an inch or more on my other bike.

    Has anyone had a 130mm fork on their Epic and are there any pics?

    Thanks, Todd.
    Contrary to previous poster, putting a 130mm fork on your epic will not rip the headtube off. And it will not make the handling "Squirrley" as posted above. The bike has race geometry, so it will be Squirrley descending, unless you slacken the HA by running a longer travel fork.

    130 will slacken the HA and stabilize Handling for descending. It would make it tougher to track in technical climbing. So you would want an adj. travel fork like a Talas, or Revelation. The Talas would be better because you could get below 100mm of travel, if you wanted.
    Astigmatic Visionary

  10. #10
    We want... a shrubbery!
    Reputation: ickyickyptngzutboing's Avatar
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    Yea, going downhill the longer travel fork worked great, but as you mentioned going uphill, and on rolling singletrack with a lot of switchbacks and turns and whatsonots, the bike did not handle confidently.

    But with that said, any update SanAnMan?
    waaahoooooooooooooooooo

    Calvin : Ahhh, another bowl of Chocolate Frosted Sugar Bombs! The second bowl is always the best! The pleasure of my first bowl is diminished by the anticipation of future bowls and by the end of my third bowl, I usually feel sick.
    Hobbes : Maybe you shouldn't use chocolate milk.
    Calvin : I tried Cola, but the bubbles went up my nose.

  11. #11
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    I have a Marzocchi Marathon XC on my Epic. I have tried running it longer than 100mm, but the handling is horrible. The front wheel just wants to slide out all the time. I had thought that I could use the ETA to control the front on climbs, and let it run full travel the rest of the time, but it just doesn't work. I much prefer the bike when the fork is set at it's lowest (100mm).

  12. #12
    Team Blindspot
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    Quote Originally Posted by boriselbrus
    I have a Marzocchi Marathon XC on my Epic. I have tried running it longer than 100mm, but the handling is horrible. The front wheel just wants to slide out all the time. I had thought that I could use the ETA to control the front on climbs, and let it run full travel the rest of the time, but it just doesn't work. I much prefer the bike when the fork is set at it's lowest (100mm).
    What do you mean the handling is horrible? While climbing or descending? It you have a Marathon 120, when the ETA is engaged, the fork is running in a lower position than a 100mm travel fork. More details please.
    Astigmatic Visionary

  13. #13
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    The fork is adjustable (not when out riding) between 100mm and 120mm as well as any length in between. when climbing I use the ETA which pushes the travel down to a stiffly sprung 50mm when in 100mm mode. When I used the fork with much more than 100mm, then descending was OK, but when climbing, the front was too high and the riding position was wrong even with the ETA on. Rolling flowing singletrack was the worst - the slack head angle and shifted back weight meant that the front tyrejust kept washing out on the turns. If your riding is just climbs followed by descents then you may get away with using a 120mm fork and using the ETA on the climbs, but then I'd have thought a different bike would be better - the best bit about the Epic is it's singletrack handling.

  14. #14
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    My Epic has 115mm Reba and I love it!

    I adjusted (internally) the travel of my Reba from 100 to 115 and I have no problems with handling (East Coast). I can set a little more sag and the forks just tracks better.

  15. #15
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    Not 130 (I think the Maverick was 150 mm), but here goes:
    http://patineto.smugmug.com/photos/49963182-M.jpg

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