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  1. #1
    evilbanks
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    New question here. Enduro SL--High / Steep or Low / Slack

    Has anyone run their rear shock on the SL in the High / Steep position? What does this do to the ride? I'm still trying to get mine setup and any input would be appreciated.
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  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: quickneonrt's Avatar
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    Try both for equal time on the same terrain and see what works best for you. What works for someone else may not work for you.

    Quote Originally Posted by b_banks
    Has anyone run their rear shock on the SL in the High / Steep position? What does this do to the ride? I'm still trying to get mine setup and any input would be appreciated.

  3. #3
    Boulder, CO
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    This is an excellent question. I have been wondering the same thing. I look forward to hearing what others have done.
    Rides:

    Mountain:

    2007 Specialized S-Works Enduro SL Carbon
    2000 Specialized S-Works FSR XC

    Road:

    2006 Pinarello Paris Carbon
    1987 Ciocc

    Transports:

    2004 BMW M3 Convertible
    1988 BMW M6
    1974 BMW 2002 tii

  4. #4
    Where are You ?
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    Darn good question and agreed that trying is the best. Until then, chew on some physics:

    Head Tube Angle I'm sure better stuff out there but wanted to post it anyhow

    http://www.calfeedesign.com/frontendterms.htm

    Also known as the steering axis, this angle influences stability in combination with fork offset by controlling "wheel flop", or the tendancy for the wheel to turn when leaned. A steep head angle is more upright and takes less effort to turn the front wheel, especially if there is too much rake or too little trail. A shallow head angle will want to turn too quickly when leaned if there is too little trail and not enough offset. So most shallow angle bikes have plenty of fork offset to compensate. Head tube angles range from 71.5 degrees to 74.5 degrees. Generally speaking, with a proper fork rake to yield a trail from 55 to 60 mm of trail, the head angles in this range are fairly stable at high speeds. The steeper head angle bikes are a little more agile, or require less effort to steer. People are usually very good at adapting to various head angle bikes if they have the proper trail.

    Also, from Single track world:

    http://www.singletrackworld.com/article.php?sid=2060

    The lower shock mount has two bolt holes, marked 'High BB/Steep' and 'Low BB/Slack' and means a degree of difference at the head angle - between 67 and 68 degrees.

    Hmmmm. looks like the shock mount moving up higher (which puts pressure on the back wheelset) changes the head angle to more upright and XCish...anyhow, food for thought. You would think a degree steeper would not be a big deal but maybe the ground geometry is such that a degree has a significant translation in actual distance the front tire comes in toward you....

    L8ters...
    Last edited by SoCaliking; 04-06-2007 at 01:50 PM.

  5. #5
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    I used to have a 1999 FSR which had a 69-70 degree head angle so switching to 67 was quite a jump. I decided to run it with the steep/high BB setting for a few rides to get used to it. I found it hard to reach the ground with my toes with the seat at the proper height compared to the crank.

    Today I did the Glentress black trail, 30km of technical single track, using the low BB / slack settings. I only had 2 pedal strikes due to the low BB height and the bike was great on the fast descents. When climbing with the fork dropped and the compression maxed it was good too. Overall I will be sticking with the low BB / slack setting from now on.

    One thing I have done to help with tight hairpins is to rotate the rubber frame protectors outward so that the part that contacts the frame is the thin bit. This gives about an extra 5 degrees of lock which really helps. Now I can corner as tight as my previous bike with a single crown. The only limiting factor is my leg getting between the bar/grip and the frame when pedaling up a hairpin. The downside is a higher risk of frame damage by the fork, but I can only see that happening if I crash.

  6. #6
    Where are You ?
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    interesting comentary dawg...thx

  7. #7
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    I actually tried both positions. I liked the slack angle best, but I did not care for the rear shock when set at the recommended sag. So I set the head angle at the steep setting, and ran 40 to 45 % rear sag. The shock was feeling the way I liked, and the head angle was about the same as if it was in the slack setting with less sag. Set up like this is as close as it will get to the feel of a coil shock.

  8. #8
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    I ran it in slack when I first got my SL, but had trouble weaving through the tight trees we have here in Southeastern PA. Just couldn't get her to steer fast enough. So I switched to the "Steep" setting. It steers a lot quicker now, but not too fast - I would say just right. You can still get the "behind the bars" feeling on steep descents too. Also, it made climbing a lot smoother too - especially sttep uphill turns.

  9. #9
    Enlightened
    Reputation: mudmojo's Avatar
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    Did you immobilize the bottom bolt with an allen key and ratchet the drive side nut off?

  10. #10
    1:18
    Reputation: Corvette's Avatar
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    Run both shuttles for a week or two and decide. Most riders prefer low one, but - YMMV.

  11. #11
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    One thing I wondered with the Enduro SL (or other double-crown forks): Is it possible to slide the fork stanchions in the clamps to change the head-angle? Then it's possible to tune the headangle with more settings.

    That's what you do on motorcycles to change the handling...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudmojo
    Did you immobilize the bottom bolt with an allen key and ratchet the drive side nut off?
    Yep. Best to make sure you have torque wrench for proper tightening.

  13. #13
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    Good point, the fork does have a max and min marking on setting up the fork. That would allow a lot more adjustability to the head angle.

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