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  1. #1
    Dad
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    Enduro Shock Setup - help!

    Hi everyone

    Just got myself a shiny new Enduro; lovin' it! However, I'm looking for some advice on how to set things up front and back to (1) get me as efficient as possible on the ups and (2) how to rapidly switch my setup for the usually subsequent downs. I've studied the manual and come up with the following, as a starting rule of thumb to climb efficiently. Please correct me if I'm wrong!

    Fork
    Attitude adjustment set to climb
    Red rebound dial fully counter clockwise
    Blue compression dial fully clockwise

    Shock
    Red dial fully counter clockwise
    Blue dial fully clockwise

    However, the blue spike valve adjuster on the shock is a mystery to me (because I'm new to this kind of tech - apologies). While it's pretty easy setting a dial which turns to a stop in either direction, the blue spike valve control just goes round and round. How do you set it?

    Thanks for your time.

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  3. #3
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    there are alot of vairables on your body size and the type of riding you do on where you will end up.

    i leave mine on the soft setting on the shock and never move it from that position .
    i run the shock 5 clicks in on rebound from all the way out and do not change it .
    i run 123 psi of pressure in the shock with no negitive pressure in it, ----and when i have negitive pressure in the sleeve i will run 140 in the positive of the shock .

    my fork stays at 90- 95 psi -----i generally do not lock down the fork for climbs , i run the rebound 2 clicks in from all the way out and it stays there.

    i will run the compression on the softest setting on the fork unless i am really doing fast hard drops ,--( Like some of the ones comming down national , or 24th street here in az )
    and then i will reach up and give the compression a twist ---generally adding 6 to 8 clicks or so and that works fine .

    getting your wheels set up tubless , and finding what pressures in your tires you can use and
    getting your chassis at the correct ride height will be the first thing that will take some playing around with , --------take a pump with you and change the setting and see where the chassis feels good for you at .-------( tires, tire set up and pressures make a huge affect on where you chassis will be set up at .

    you can play with pressures--ft and rear --- and the forks slide up and down,--- and the shock has a high and a low setting also .

    it takes awhile to really get the thing where you want it depending on where and how you ride .
    enjoy and have fun, ------the bike can be set up for many riding diciplins

  4. #4
    Fat Skis/Fat Tires
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dad
    However, the blue spike valve adjuster on the shock is a mystery to me (because I'm new to this kind of tech - apologies). While it's pretty easy setting a dial which turns to a stop in either direction, the blue spike valve control just goes round and round. How do you set it?

    Thanks for your time.
    First of all, congrats on your new purchase of the best bike ever made, period.

    Secondly, even though the compression dampening dial (the blue dial on the shock) does indeed go 'round and 'round, there are two positions which indicate either max dampening (where the tab on the dial is horizontal and pointing to your right pedal, and the "F" for firm is visible as you look down) or min dampening (tab pointing to left pedal, "S" for soft visible from above).

    They designed it this way so you can just go over the top from one extreme to the other quickly. I use it in this manner all the time, where I reach down to flick it from "F" to "S" at the top of a climb.

    Sounds like you have the fork figured out, a quick twist of the attitude adjust counter-clockwise at the top of the climb, and another counter-clockwise twist of the blue compression dampening dial is all I do.

    I have been running my rebound dampening at full-fast all the time (all the way counter-clockwise on both the shock and fork), but am reconsidering after pogoing upon landing a drop yesterday. I think I might try it somewhere it in the middle for the decents.

    Have fun!!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by kelstr
    there are alot of vairables on your body size and the type of riding you do on where you will end up.

    i leave mine on the soft setting on the shock and never move it from that position .
    i run the shock 5 clicks in on rebound from all the way out and do not change it .
    i run 123 psi of pressure in the shock with no negitive pressure in it, ----and when i have negitive pressure in the sleeve i will run 140 in the positive of the shock .

    my fork stays at 90- 95 psi -----i generally do not lock down the fork for climbs , i run the rebound 2 clicks in from all the way out and it stays there.

    i will run the compression on the softest setting on the fork unless i am really doing fast hard drops ,--( Like some of the ones comming down national , or 24th street here in az )
    and then i will reach up and give the compression a twist ---generally adding 6 to 8 clicks or so and that works fine .

    getting your wheels set up tubless , and finding what pressures in your tires you can use and
    getting your chassis at the correct ride height will be the first thing that will take some playing around with , --------take a pump with you and change the setting and see where the chassis feels good for you at .-------( tires, tire set up and pressures make a huge affect on where you chassis will be set up at .

    you can play with pressures--ft and rear --- and the forks slide up and down,--- and the shock has a high and a low setting also .

    it takes awhile to really get the thing where you want it depending on where and how you ride .
    enjoy and have fun, ------the bike can be set up for many riding diciplins
    you run no neg pressure at all in the fork leg?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by LARRYTHELATHE
    you run no neg pressure at all in the fork leg?
    well , the left fork leg that has the positive pressure ride height air in it , -----------also has a negitive pressure chamber in it -------and that negitive pressure is controlled by a spring ----,

    ( i have changed my spring around several times ,--lighter and then back to the heaiver one ------and i have gone back to the stock heavy spring and found it works good for me )-------( i wanted to converter this chamber to an air adjustable negitive pressure to get a finer range of adjustement-----i just have not got that far yet--------the standerd spring works well for a large range of riders )

    so thats why there is not alot of talk on negitive pressures on this bike ---------you have to be alittle creative at this time to play with negitive pressures in the fork and shock.

    negitive pressure it is a good tunning tool for the guy that really wants to alter the feel and get the thing dialed to his feel.

    but generally the normal guy does not need that much more tunning ability.

    i just think its really cool to be able to really think outside the box and get something working even better --------and get a bike to pedal good and feel like butter ----and work in all disciplines .

  7. #7
    Dad
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    Thanks!

    Wow! Thanks very much indeed to all the helpful info here. I couldn't agree more with the numerous accolades here and elsewhere for this bike. I'm nowhere near being able to extract full function from this bike (yet) and feel like a kid in a Porsche GT, So exciting to gradually start trying bigger/sketchier stuff, but the bike won't be the limiting factor for a long time. I'm covered in bruises and scrapes, but loving it.

    Given what you guys have thrown my way, I now officially have no excuse but to keep experimenting and eventually getting it right. I've been in and out of biking over the years (mostly time trialing on roads) but am just amazed at where MTB tech has come, now I'm getting back into it. It also seems to have spawned a generation of highly capable and knowledgeable home mechanics whose passion for plain fun has developed within them an intimate awareness of how these beautfiul machines work. Very cool.

    Thanks again.

  8. #8
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    Moohaa haa haa,

    Specialized's evil plan to convert bored with life road riders into full on technical trail riders is working!!!!

  9. #9
    Dad
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    There's only so many miles of yellow lines I can look at...

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