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  1. #1
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    do carbon bars really help absorb shock?

    i was thinking about getting some s works carbon bars for my epic for this reason, is there any truth to it?

  2. #2
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    Absorb shock? Not so much. But they do dampen vibration to a certain degree.

  3. #3
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    the terrain i ride is very bumpy especially in the fast down hill sections, i was trying out the new epic which is stock at the moment, on the last downhill i had to stop for a while, my hands were shredded, the stock grips are garbage i had to replace them with the enduro grips from my xc and that has helped a good bit, im just wondering would a carbon bar help in this situation??

  4. #4
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    you're going to find people who swear by caarbon bars because of the supposed damping quality it holds, and others who say they dont work and they dont do anything. I think they really do work well, and planning on getting a new set when my bike gets built. go for it, little extra cash, but well worth it. lighter too! I know a 300lb guy that cracked a brand new road bike frame within 33 miles, but still rocks easton dh carbon bars on his demo, no crack yet... just make sure you don't overtighten anything!

  5. #5
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    im going to give them a whirl to see for myself then, im not saving much weight over the stock epic bars, i think only about 25 or 03 grams but id me more than happy if they helped with the fatigue i get in my hands on the downhills

  6. #6
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    try changing the diameter of your grips too. For some people a thick grip fits their hands better and they dont squeeze quite as hard. Other its just the opposite. But that in conjunction with the new bars should help.

  7. #7
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    i did, i changed them out for the grips on my xc which are thicker and have more rubber padding, made a big difference, thanks for the views guys, im gonna give them a whirl

  8. #8
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    I think it depends a lot on the type of carbon used.
    I bought a Bontrager XXX Lite OS (31.8mm) flat bar for my Klein hoping for some extra comfort, but found it didn't make a lick of difference compared to the stock aluminum bars. This bar uses OCLV, Trek's most compressed grade of carbon. Tapping the surface of the bar, it hurts your nails it's so hard.

    But then I met someone on the trails using an Easton Monkey Lite 25.4, and that bar was flexible enough that I could feel it flex under my whopping 120lbs of weight. Tapping it, the carbon felt soft, like I was tapping hard plastic. Next year I'm thinking of getting an Easton bar and ditching Bonty.

  9. #9
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    I'd say your fork is over-sprung... take 5-10 psi out.

    The carbon bar debate is tough, some people swear that they feel the difference with carbon bars and seatposts and that they absorb SOME vibration. I wouldn't say your hand fatigue would be significantly diminished to the point where it would be a strong ehough argument to buy one, but thats me and I have pretty burly hands. While I don't have any carbon bits on my mountain bikes, my road bike is carbon and I have an aluminum seatpost and bar with a carbon stem and seem to do just fine. Maybe look into a carbon stem? I dunno, I've just seen quite a lot of really bad things happen when you crash on carbon fiber parts. Also, if you're going to get carbon bits I recommend buying a torque wrench if you do any work on your bike yourself. A quarter turn too far on any bolt on your handlebar is all you need to turn that expensive bike part into useless garbage, funny thing is you might not know until its too late and your handlebar makes a clean break right where your brakes bolt up on your next ride. I've seen these things happen before, you have been warned.

  10. #10
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    mmm, well since im changing out a lot of the stock stuff on the bike i was going to go for the bar also, ill see what weight im down to before i make a decision on the bar, my fork is not over sprung, it dives through a lot of its travel on the trails with no jumps, i can see the mark when im finished, thing is i dont notice it diving, it seems very stiff yet plush, i guess thats the difference between a fox RL and a rock shox recon, at the moment im using thicker padded gloves on the the inside plus the enduro grips from my xc, i took the same run on the monday and things were a lot better compared with the saturday

  11. #11
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    in a word over a handlebar length no

  12. #12
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    Go for it. I can feel a BIG difference between my CF Stumpjumper and my old Alum Diamondback. Given a lot more of my bike is carbon fibre then just the handlebars but I do believe they help in the vibrations department.

    As for the strength of carbon fibre, it all depends on the quality of the manufacturer, which in Specialized's case is quite high. Hell my CF Stumpjumper was hit by a speeding car and had no cracks and no failures. Do remember that most hits that would destroy CF would also destroy an alum part.
    Mountain biking is not about how fast you go, it's about how many new friends you have at the bar after the ride.

  13. #13
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    I've ridden a few different types with a few different results. Scott made (or maybe still makes) a thermoplastic composite bar - those damped the small stuff REALLY well. Unfortunately they broke after a while for me. The newer stuff that I've tried - the original Easton carbon composite monkey bars and the Answer bars are thermoset composites and are a bit stiff - less harsh than aluminum is but not quite as 'soft' feeling as the Scott nylon ones. Anyway, don't let the bar breakage scare you as I break handlebars, esp the aluminum ones quite a bit.

    I'll tell you what - the newer forks with the 'small bump' adjustments negate all this anyway. When I was riding the Scott bars, I didn't even have a suspension fork.

  14. #14
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    im not an aggressive rider im not worried about breaking the bars, ill probably got for it and see how they feel, i may change out the X7 shifters to XO also save 100 grams with the bar and have a blinged out cluster up front

  15. #15
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    They look bling and are light, that's about the only difference I've noticed of my Easton Monkelite bars on my Stumpy FSR.

  16. #16
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    Fugue,

    Try some Ergon grips. They made a huge difference for my hands and wrists.

    BeanMan

  17. #17
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    thanks Beanman, ill check em out

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