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  1. #1
    Rob Munro
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    demo 9 as a trail bike?

    I know it would thrive in the freeride/downhill arena, but could you also ride the demo9 as a XC trail bike?

  2. #2
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    Demo 9 Cross Country Steed

    I have a 2004 Demo 9 Pro that I have ridden on lift access trails and local Colorado front range trails. The weight weenies give me dirty looks but who cares. The bike is heavy, bobs slightly while pedaling, and takes some skill on the really steep ups and switch backs. On the plus side, while the hardtails are pushing their bikes up the really technical steeps, as long as my legs hold out I can climb anything. The suspension system does a great job of smoothing out the bumps and the high bottom bracket gets over even the highest water bars and steps. So if you have the legs and lungs you can do it. Plus I got into shape faster that my pals on lighter bikes.

    Oh yeah, one more thing...When the trail turns DOWN, nothing can touch you.
    "Failing to fetch me at first keep encouraged, missing me one place search another, I stop somewhere waiting for you." W. W.

  3. #3
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    it should be fine, but it would be tiring for you. my friend has a bighit and just flys downhills.

  4. #4
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    Honestly if you are going to be trail riding stay away froma demo 9 or 8 its a 50 pound DH bike and the 8 is a 45 pound DH bike they are heavy as hell and are not going to be fun to climb, check out the enduro SX trail

  5. #5
    Rob Munro
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    Quote Originally Posted by themontashu
    Honestly if you are going to be trail riding stay away froma demo 9 or 8 its a 50 pound DH bike and the 8 is a 45 pound DH bike they are heavy as hell and are not going to be fun to climb, check out the enduro SX trail
    I should provide some back up information...clarify the reason for my initial question. I've been riding an '05 FSR XC Comp on XC trails. I recently got into DH, and have been renting. I found a used but immaculate '04 Demo 9 pro for $2400, an absolute steal. And I'm trying to figure out if I could use that as my only bike?

  6. #6
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    The 04 demos are 52 pounds keep the XC bike

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by themontashu
    The 04 demos are 52 pounds keep the XC bike

    I had a demo 8 and sold it after 1 month because the weight was just to much .....for every 3 mins of downhill fun there is a 30 minute climb ....the 8 WAS JUST WAY TO HEAVEY AND KILLED THE FUN OF MOUNTAIN BIKING... i learnt that iam a mountain biker not a downhiller.

  8. #8
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    The Demo is an awesome bike, but it's weight isn't the only issue counting against it's xc ability. For starters, the geometry is kicked right back which is hardly going to help with climbing and the long travel suspension wasn't designed with efficient pedalling in mind.

    Theoretically you could lock down the front fork, but with a triple clamper restricting your turning circle I'd hate to have to manoever the thing around tight singletrack.

    If you're looking for something that likes descending, is hard hitting but won't complain too much about being used on the occasional trail then the Enduro SX Trail is the bike to go for IMHO.

  9. #9
    Specialized Rida
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Munro
    I know it would thrive in the freeride/downhill arena, but could you also ride the demo9 as a XC trail bike?
    I am a demo 9 rider, who's came from a XC background. The biggest things that you will hear people say is the weight issue and that it's hard to pedal.

    In every case that is true, but the here is the plus side to it. once you start riding your demo like a XC it will be the best form of training you can do if you decide to go back to a XC bike.

    I have noticed the be extremely painfull trying to pedal that bike around, but have gotten used to is and have pretty muched developed the legs and lungs to be able to ride that thing faster. Also on the uphills when you come across rocks, waterbreaks or anything that would knock you off balance the DH bike becomes your best friend becuase you won't have to pull up to go over those things, the suspension will do it for you and you won't even feel it. Man I like that feature......

    Now that i have been riding my demo or my bighit as a crosscountry bike i feel in far more superior shape than I ever have before. even when i was riding XC doing hundreds 20 plus miles everytime I went for a ride. The resistance is the key for developing big legs and strong lungs. Trust me on this. And the DH bike is the bike to give you those things...quick....

    So as of right now I will stick to my demo becuase it has not become possible to ride it as my XC bike. it might be a little slower, but with a little time i should be able to start riding as a normal bike..

  10. #10
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    Welcome to life in Vancouver!

    We've been using big bikes as our primary bikes for years and have noticed the same things. The Demo is a great pedalling bike with a nearly-full-length seat tube. The only real issue you've got is suspension and weight.

    You're so right about the fitness thing. You wouldn't go to the gym and lift less weight if you wanted to get stronger (i.e. getting a lighter bike)!

    Nothing beats the feeling of going to a lighter bike after doing a bunch of months on your big bike.

    I've been riding 45 lb + bikes for years up and down and have never had much reason to complain. As long as the bike fits and provides a reasonable body position and the suspension is set up correctly there is no reason why you can't use a big bike as your full-time machine.

  11. #11
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    As far as bikes go, you can pedal anything you want up hill if you've got the willingness to learn and the determination to slog through it. With a big bike I feel it's important to have a small chainring in order to clean long steep sections.

    I have also found that for some XC trails a big bike makes them less challenging and fun. If you've got good enough terrain for most of your riding you can have a blast on a big bike. If you're standard terrain rarely pushes your limits then you'll probably find yourself wanting to ride a more XC oriented bike. P.S. I'm super happy with my SX Trail, which goes up hill quite well. It is my heavy duty and all-purpose bike. I rode a BigHit last summer, which was great too. Just remember: heavy bikes + big tires = terrible acceleration.

  12. #12
    mechmann_mtb
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    i could be WAY off, but you can DH on a 6" Enduro. get one of the 06 models with 2x9, bashring, sram components etc. you can get it down to 30lbs pretty easily, mine is down to 29 i think.

    might just be me, but i wouldn't want to lug a 50lbs bike up any tough XC trails, not when you can have 2" less travel and 20 lbs less weight.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mechmann_mtb
    i could be WAY off, but you can DH on a 6" Enduro. get one of the 06 models with 2x9, bashring, sram components etc. you can get it down to 30lbs pretty easily, mine is down to 29 i think.

    might just be me, but i wouldn't want to lug a 50lbs bike up any tough XC trails, not when you can have 2" less travel and 20 lbs less weight.

    I think your absolutely right, but I think he was asking if it was possible to ride a DH bike as a trail bike. My opinion is yes. given that you ride frequently enough to the point that you wont even notice the weight of the bike.
    Eventually the strength and endurance will come with time, and riding a Dh bike about 50 lbs. will not be as hard to ride on the trails as it once used to be, that includes riding the beast uphill.

    that is also assuming that the only bike that person has is a DH bike.

  14. #14
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    Good job! You're the guy?

    Quote Originally Posted by hurtman
    I have a 2004 Demo 9 Pro that I have ridden on lift access trails and local Colorado front range trails.
    I think I saw you riding Dakota Ridge ccw earlier this summer. And I thought I was doing some work riding my 42 lb IH 7 Point around front range trails. Actually, it's about a even swap which is easier, the 7 Point, or my 33 lb hardtail set up 1x9...
    Props for pedalling the big bike uphill!

    And to the original poster - unless you're racing dh, you'll probly be happier w/ a more versatile all-around bike. If you have your heart set on the big bike, at least do what I did and build up a hardtail to give you an option. IMO, it's not worth it to have more fun on lift assisted days if your overall riding time falls off.
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