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  1. #1
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    Curing pedal strike on a 2009 Pitch

    I'm having pedal strike issues with my 09 Pitch and I am wondering whether others have experienced this and how they have solved it. It is noticeable on technical rocky uphills - I am having to get off the bike in places where I can ride through on my other bike with a higher BB.

    As far as I can see my options are one or more of:

    1. run shorter cranks - I have 175mm cranks at the moment
    2. put more air in the shock - currently running about 17mm sag (ideally I don't want to put more air in because I like the suspension performance how it is)
    3. put a bigger rear tyre on the back - currently a 2.25 Conti Rubber Queen and 2.4 on the front
    4. get lower profile pedals - currently swapping between Shimano DX647s and Spesh LoPros
    5. keep the propedal switched on more through the tech uphills (I don't really want to do this either because the places I ride have technical rocky uphills followed immediately by rocky downhills and switching on the fly is a hassle)
    6. suck it up and be prepared for a pedal to stop against a rock and throw me down a bank. Again.
    how have others addressed the issue?

  2. #2
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    Pedal strikes with a lower BB are just something you're going to have to get used to. Mind over matter = It's kinda tough to "reset" your pedals as you come up on some tech sections. Meaning, if you see a rock coming up on your right side, and you know you might strike it, try back spinning 1/2 crank and reset the crank arm/pedal rotation and see if you clear it.....other than that....if all the other things you suggested are items you don't want to mess with, it's gonna happen more often.

  3. #3
    PNW Freeride
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    I agree with pedal-man, got to get used to dodging rocks with your pedal rotations.
    Lower profile pedals would help, look into Canfield Crampon or Kona Wah-Wah's (<--what i am running on my Pitch).

  4. #4
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    Sorry, newbie question...but what is a pedal strike?
    <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

  5. #5
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    Sorry, newbie question...but what is a pedal strike?
    When you are pedalling along, your pedal smacks into something along the trail. Often caused because the bike's bottom bracket is low, which means there isn't much clearance between the pedal (at the bottom of its stroke) and the terrain. At best it is annoying because the pedal glances off something like a rock. At worst (as has happened to me once, prompting this thread) the pedal gets caught on the obstacle and the bike stops and you fall off

    The suggestions above about taking care with adjusting the pedal stroke on rocks are sensible - I must try to perfect this. Most of the time I try to do this - there are just a couple of areas where I have to pedal constantly to keep up enough momentum to get up over the rocks without stalling and there is a continuous rocky ledge on one side so I can't time the pedal stroke to avoid this.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ringo
    When you are pedalling along, your pedal smacks into something along the trail. Often caused because the bike's bottom bracket is low, which means there isn't much clearance between the pedal (at the bottom of its stroke) and the terrain. At best it is annoying because the pedal glances off something like a rock. At worst (as has happened to me once, prompting this thread) the pedal gets caught on the obstacle and the bike stops and you fall off

    The suggestions above about taking care with adjusting the pedal stroke on rocks are sensible - I must try to perfect this. Most of the time I try to do this - there are just a couple of areas where I have to pedal constantly to keep up enough momentum to get up over the rocks without stalling and there is a continuous rocky ledge on one side so I can't time the pedal stroke to avoid this.
    Then....."young grasshopper", you must perfect the "track stand" and integrate some trials type of skill......or just haul a$$ into said technical and hope you come out the other side.

  7. #7
    JCL
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    Run 165mm's. It won't prevent it 100% but it'll help. I don't run anything else these days.

  8. #8
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    I'm running 170's on mine. I still have pedal strike, but it is a worthwhile trade-off. There have been a few technical climbs where I have just walked because of the low BB.

    Like everything in mountain biking it is a compromise - good for some stuff, not so good for other stuff. I like it low and don't mind when it hits. I recommend trying to adapt your riding to it. Failing that I bet there are a ton of people who would trade you for a bike with a higher BB.

  9. #9
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    Lower profile pedals could make a difference. I strike the pedals all the time when using my Wellgo V8 copy's but hardly ever when running SPD's. The V8's are kinda chunky though.

  10. #10
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    i can see buying a different crank arm length to match your body for pedaling efficiency but is it really worth the money for 10mm? Not even half an inch? I think just watch were your pedals go on the down stroke.

  11. #11
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    Hmm, sounds like crank length helps to some extent. Might hold that in reserve as it is a more expensive option. In the meantime, I might throw a fraction more air in the shock and see what happens to the ride quality, and also use propedal when on the technical climbs. I've found that lower profile flats helped, as the V8s (and even the DX647 clips) were a bit deep.

    And there will probably be a couple of places on my regular rides where I will just need to get off (no amount of pedal stroke timing will help in these places unfortunately). But I'm happy to live with it because I really like how the bike handles generally!

  12. #12
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    Plan your pedal strokes better by picking the best line ahead of time.

  13. #13
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    I have a few strikes now and again, it's never thrown me. The ones I do get are over so quick there's no point worrying about them

  14. #14
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    Yeah, you can't just expect to be pedaling no matter what comes up on the trail. Like was said, you have to look ahead and prepare for what's coming by stopping pedalling for a brief moment or adjusting pedal position. After some time this should happen automatically. Low BB is worth it in the descents and corners. But I would get low profile pedals (if you don't run clipless).

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