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  1. #1
    TJK
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    Can someone help me figure out what year this Epic is?

    I've been searching around trying to find out about this thing but can't seem to figure out the year and find an exact match up when looking around. Maybe someone here will know. I received it as a gift and i'm sure the forks have never been serviced and I know the brain wasn't as advanced either. Should I get all that checked out, or think about upgrading to another bike?

    Here's a picture:

    Thanks everyone.

  2. #2
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    2004 epic comp.

    BikePedia - 2004 Specialized Epic Comp Disc Complete Bicycle

    Its a great bike. Fox forks have not changed much since 2004. They are pretty easy to work on, and instructions can be found online. I would change the fork seals and put fresh oil in the fork and it will feel almost as good as a new one.

    The rear shock is not easily serviced by the user. If it is not working it would need to be sent to Fox for service. You can fit a shock up to a 2008 on that frame but they are not easy to find.
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  3. #3
    TJK
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalfaraway View Post
    BikePedia - 2004 Specialized Epic Comp Disc Complete Bicycle

    Its a great bike. Fox forks have not changed much since 2004. They are pretty easy to work on, and instructions can be found online. I would change the fork seals and put fresh oil in the fork and it will feel almost as good as a new one.

    The rear shock is not easily serviced by the user. If it is not working it would need to be sent to Fox for service. You can fit a shock up to a 2008 on that frame but they are not easy to find.
    Oh awesome thank you for that link! Also he must've changed the fork because it has a Float 100 RL on it now. I'll definitely check out how to change the seals and oil it up!

    The LBS is certified by Fox so I can take the rear shock to them. They even gave me a 20% discount on servicing if I bring it in to them. Since i haven't ridden a real mountain bike in years i'm not too sure how well it's working.

    Also I know that the lockout is not working on the fork, would seals and oil fix that? Or could there be a bigger problem? Thank you!

    -TJ

  4. #4
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    Looking at that photograph my suggestion would be to take the bike into the LBS and ask them for an opinion of how much work needs to be done on it. I'd try and get an idea of how much it would cost to fix before sinking any money into. There's a lot of rust visible on the exposed bolts so it's possible that some of the parts you can't see (such as the headset bearings) have rusted also.

    It looks like it could need a new drivetrain - chain, chainrings and rear cassette. The outer chainring teeth look a little hooked. The middle ring usually wears out before the outer ring so that's probably had it too. When replacing the chainrings it's best to replace the chain and cassette at the same time. If it's original then the bottom bracket is likely to be worn out too.

    The most expensive repairs would be to the suspension. It probably needs the rear shock servicing, the fork definitely needs repairing / servicing and the bushings? in the rear suspension pivots are likely to need replacing also.

    Other items like the Shimano hydraulic disc brakes could need new pads, or maybe even replacing altogether if the seals are going.

    The handlebar grips aren't worn out but do look as though they're the wrong way round. The long wing section should be at the rear of the handlebar so that you can rest your palms on it.
    Last edited by WR304; 10-24-2012 at 04:55 AM.

  5. #5
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    It does not take a shop.

    The Problems mentioned by WR304 can exist on any used bike. Even if you have to do new rings and cassette, brake pads, suspension rebuild, cables, chain, etc. If you do the work yourself, and buy the parts online for good deals you could have it mint for 500ish. I would clean it, make sure the wheels roll free, lube the chain, adjust the shifting, change the oil in the fork (Its already got enduro seals which last a long time) for some torco 7.5 wt fork fluid (way cheaper then fox fluid) Make sure the brakes work and the pads are ok. Then ride it and be happy you got a sweet bike for very little money. If problems come up deal with them. You will save a ton of money in the long run if you invest in some basic bike tools, and learn how to work on your bike yourself. Bikes are pretty simple machines.
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  6. #6
    TJK
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    Thank you both for the replies! I took it out saturday and rode it, that's why it's a bit dirty in the photo. The brakes work great as far as I can tell, they stop on a dime. They were squeaking so I looked it up and spun the wheel while cleaning them with rubbing alcohol and that fixed it pretty much. The wheels roll free and good and I lubed the chain after I washed it too.

    I will be sure to oil the fork. Also what will adjusting the shifting do, i'm not sure how to do it and what it will change?

    I took some more photos for you if you'd like to take a look at them, maybe you'll see something that wasn't found in the first photo. Thanks!

    Photo Album - Imgur

  7. #7
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    The bike's drivetrain looks a lot better in your close up photos than in the first picture. Unless the drivetrain is skipping under power it looks ok and probably doesn't need replacing. What you'd be looking for in terms of wear is if the chainring and sprocket teeth had worn into thin spikes with a hooked appearance. Close up they don't seem to have done that. The granny ring looks completely unused and the middle ring appears to be in good condition too.

    These park tool links explain how to adjust the front and rear derailleur.

    Park Tool Co. ParkTool Blog Rear Derailler Adjustments (derailleur)

    Park Tool Co. ParkTool Blog Front Derailleur Adjustments

    The aim with adjusting the gears is to get a nice clean up or downshift whenever you press the rear changer without too much hesitation. When indexed, the chain should run smoothly on the rear sprockets, without any ticking noises or skipping from the rear cassette.

    I'm not too sure about the rear suspension. There's some rust but you can't really tell if there's an issue from the photos. If it isn't creaking, and there isn't any side to side play or slop in the rear suspension then you could probably just ride it as it is.

  8. #8
    TJK
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    The bike's drivetrain looks a lot better in your close up photos than in the first picture. Unless the drivetrain is skipping under power it looks ok and probably doesn't need replacing. What you'd be looking for in terms of wear is if the chainring and sprocket teeth had worn into thin spikes with a hooked appearance. Close up they don't seem to have done that. The granny ring looks completely unused and the middle ring appears to be in good condition too.

    These park tool links explain how to adjust the front and rear derailleur.

    Park Tool Co. ParkTool Blog Rear Derailler Adjustments (derailleur)

    Park Tool Co. ParkTool Blog Front Derailleur Adjustments

    The aim with adjusting the gears is to get a nice clean up or downshift whenever you press the rear changer without too much hesitation. When indexed, the chain should run smoothly on the rear sprockets, without any ticking noises or skipping from the rear cassette.

    I'm not too sure about the rear suspension. There's some rust but you can't really tell if there's an issue from the photos. If it isn't creaking, and there isn't any side to side play or slop in the rear suspension then you could probably just ride it as it is.
    Thank you! Glad to hear it's not as bad as you originally thought haha I'll definitely read those links and adjust the gears so they're good. The suspension is creaking and doesn't seem to have any side to side play that I can notice. Should I bother taking it in for that? I didn't really get to tell how well it was working on my first ride. I did adjust the pressure correctly in the forks according to what fox says and my weight. The lockout definitely isn't working though so I guess i'll take it in for that, or just have them look at it and tell me.

    Would changing out the oil in the fork have any effect on the lockout working or not? I appreciate the help, I can't wait until this thing is riding as perfect as it can!

  9. #9
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    If you've got the spare time and tools then the fork should be repairable at home. Order a new Fox internal seal kit, some suspension fork oil (you can get it cheaply from motorcycle shops) and work through it methodically.

    Here's the instructions:

    F100RL/F80RL

    The rear suspension is a different question because if you pull the back end apart and it's all wrecked you have to source the spare parts, which could be hassle for an older Specialized Epic. The brain rear shock will need to go back to Fox for a service.

    Bike Suspension Service | FOX

    .

  10. #10
    TJK
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    Thanks for the links! If my LBS is an authorized service center I can bring the brain to them? Or will the brain rear shock still need to be sent in because it's a specialized/fox part?

  11. #11
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    The Epic's brain rear shock would have to be sent back to Fox for servicing. The brain rear shock is nitrogen charged so standard bike shops don't have the equipment available in-house to do the work.

    The bike shop should be able to sort out the frame's rear pivots though.

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