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  1. #1
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    Brake vibration resonance. has anyone got long term fix?

    Wanted to start a new thread on this.

    and I want to clearify that this is NOT your regular everyday squeek or turkey noise that most all brakes make a little of. This is a wicked vibration from the rear brake that resonates throughout the entire bike up to the handlebars. sounds like a fog horn. I have had this issue on my 2010 Stumpjumper FSR comp26" for the last two years. I have tried EVERYTHING including ditching the Avid brakes and installing a set of Formulas. different pads, size rotors, different type rotors (even tried the solid rotor)

    I am convinced that this is an issue with the frame. and it seems to happen after the pads have fully seated in. I have tried different things over and over and the noise/vibration will go away. but eventually comes back after the pads bed in. I was wondering if anyone has had the same issue ...again, this vibration resonance not just squeek. and if anyone has had a long term fix.

  2. #2
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    Check the pad wear. Is it uneven or otherwise odd? If it is then it could be an alignment issue.

    The other thing I would check is your rear wheel. Are the bearing OK, and it is running true? When under braking pressure, the wheel could be causing the rotor to run out of true.

  3. #3
    DynoDon
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    It seems the only thing you haven't considered is contamination, I'd reccomend Finish Line Ceramic Wax, don't laugh, this is the least contaminating lube system I've found, it doesn't take much, most of it dries up leaving your chain lubed with ceramic lube, its fairly new, last way longer then wax, I'm not sure why they call it wax, it sure is clean, very little build up, nothing like other waxes. Make sure to keep it off your rotors. Good Luck...
    Four wheels transport the body,

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by skiwi View Post
    Check the pad wear. Is it uneven or otherwise odd? If it is then it could be an alignment issue.

    The other thing I would check is your rear wheel. Are the bearing OK, and it is running true? When under braking pressure, the wheel could be causing the rotor to run out of true.
    I know you guys are trying to help, but please understand. I have probably changed the pads 10 times on this bike (6-8 avids and then switched to Formulas) I have put about 2000 miles on this bike. I have two completely different wheelsets. I have lost count how many times I have aligned the caliper (50?) I have switched the entire brake system from avid to formula and the exact same vibration comes back no matter what I do. I know other people have been through something similar with specialized and I hope you will chime in.

  5. #5
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    for example: I went to my LBS (thanks guys here in temecula for trying!)

    and we tried a diffent size brand new rotor. the noise/vibration only changed slightly in pitch. we tried diffent pdas. alignment. cleaning. everything. we wrapped the chainstays with foam and weights.

    The only thing that has helped is wrapping the upper seats stay to the lower chain stay with an inner tube so that the two are pulling against each other. this seems to be a 50% fix but is extremely ugly. I have also changed all the suspension piviot bearings (lower near the crank was siezed after racing in the rain and mud) I even filled the frame stays with expanding foam. I don't think there is anything I hav not tried, and so I already have gave up to tell the tuth. I am already shopping for another bike. I just would like to fix this one someday, somehow.

  6. #6
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    You need to file the edges of the brake pad lining, clean and lube the backing plate and piston, go out an ride.

  7. #7
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    Dude, I know your pain, however, I didn't change 20 sets of pads and brake sets. I had this exact problem on my 2006 Demo 8 with Saint brakes and your right about the pads bedding in and then it happens- honking, shuttering vibration through the entire bike. Then I sold the Demo 8 for the 2007 Demo 7 and guess what, the vibration jumped from the old bike to the new one! I've had a few sets of pads but nothing worked. So I live with it. I almost wish that the calipers had a vibration damper like a tennis racquet.
    A few things that helped: SPARINGLY GREASE the contact points of all metals in the braking system. This includes between hub and rotor, rotor and bolt heads, caliper bolts and frame, the back of the brake pad and the piston. So obviously you will néed thicker grease so it stays put and helps with vibration dampening. This tip was passed to me by the best mechanic I know and it helped the most ( the problem was much quieter). I know it sounds crazy to get grease anywhere near your pads and rotors, be careful not to contaminate things if you put to much the heat will cause the grease to run out cnd contaminate the pads. Hope this helps...
    Oh here's something I haven't tried- o rings from the hardware store, try one under the caliper bolt head and one between the frame and caliper, not to thick. The idea is to help the stop the resonance from traveling up the frame.
    I'm GNARcissistic

  8. #8
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    I didn't see any mention of cleaning the build up from around the pistons which can cause them to not move freely or in EXACT unison. This is what causes that horrifying back brake resonance for me with Magura Marta SL brakes. But once I do the proceedure and free up the pistons, the issue is resolved or at least minimized until build up once again causes the pistons to stick/freeze up.

    I also find that a little hard braking on the rear to heat up the rotor seems to stop the resonance if/when it starts up.

    There could also be a little air in the system or weak/worn out fluid.

    It was also recommended by a Magura rep to have the brake tab(s) machined to provide a perfectly flat contact point where the caliper bolts on.

    There an article in the newest MBA magazine about doing this proceedure on your calipers.

  9. #9
    DynoDon
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    If your anywhere Michigan bring the bike into our shop, our head mech has been there since he was 13 yrs of, he's near 50 now, we are a Specialized dealer, if he can't figure it out it can't be figured out, Town N Country in Livonia, Mi near Detroit, we are far from a high tech shop, more old school, a real bike shop, we don't sharpen Hockey skates, we don't sell anything other then bicycle stuff, we fix ****, if we can't it can't be fixed. I will be warranteed, Otto is there on Mon, Tues, and Wensday, we ride bikes, we have the passion, let a pro look at it, or keep Paying peanuts and getting monkeys.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ambassadorhawg View Post
    I didn't see any mention of cleaning the build up from around the pistons which can cause them to not move freely or in EXACT unison. This is what causes that horrifying back brake resonance for me with Magura Marta SL brakes. But once I do the proceedure and free up the pistons, the issue is resolved or at least minimized until build up once again causes the pistons to stick/freeze up.

    I also find that a little hard braking on the rear to heat up the rotor seems to stop the resonance if/when it starts up.

    There could also be a little air in the system or weak/worn out fluid.

    It was also recommended by a Magura rep to have the brake tab(s) machined to provide a perfectly flat contact point where the caliper bolts on.

    There an article in the newest MBA magazine about doing this proceedure on your calipers.
    I've got a 2010 Stumpy with Avid's and started having the same problem after I changed out the stock pads on the rear. I bought metallic pads thinking that's what was originally in there but they turned out to be organic. After the pads bed in, I started having a crazy vibration. Cleaned the pistons as indicated above and the problem mostly went away. It's kind of a PITA, but well worth the effort.

  11. #11
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    I have exact problem on my Enduro '11 with Shimano SLX 2012 brakes.

    I didn't have any problem while I have 160 rotor at the rear (smrt76) and after some time I changed 160 rotor for brand new 180 (smrt76) rotor.
    After first ride everything was great and on the second ride at the middle of the trail the whole bike was start to vibrate.

    After that every ride is the same soon i hit rear brake. I tried everything but still no improvement.

    Last option to try is to change back to 160 rotor to see if it's gonna happend again and i will try with Hope SAW rotor.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarlS View Post
    I know you guys are trying to help, but please understand. I have probably changed the pads 10 times on this bike (6-8 avids and then switched to Formulas) I have put about 2000 miles on this bike. I have two completely different wheelsets. I have lost count how many times I have aligned the caliper (50?) I have switched the entire brake system from avid to formula and the exact same vibration comes back no matter what I do. I know other people have been through something similar with specialized and I hope you will chime in.
    I hear you, but you're not hearing me. I said have you checked the wear pattern on the pads? If one is wearing more than the other, you have a piston issue - sticking or otherwise not working in tandem, or an alignment issue - the caliper not straight (this could possibly be misaligned mounting holes) - or the wheel mounting moving under load.

    Brake vibrations are not rocket science. The brake rotor is vibrating in the caliper and those vibrations are resonating through the frame. Those issues are classically alignment issues, uneven piston activation, or deposits on the rotors.

    Usual rules apply. To paraphrase Sherlock Holmes "Eliminate all other factors, and the one which remains must be the truth."

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by zgmmax View Post
    . . . at the middle of the trail the whole bike was start to vibrate.
    I haven't tried this but this may work if someone is willing to try.

    The attached photo is a screen shot of anti-squeel products. I will try these on my Formula The One brakes for wet weather use.

    My 911 has a small vibration damper fitted between the pad and piston.

    The point is, WE ARE NOT ALONE!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Brake vibration resonance.  has anyone got long term fix?-brake-anti-squeal.jpg  

    Brake vibration resonance.  has anyone got long term fix?-brake-vibration-damper.jpg  

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  14. #14
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    You are effectively matching the resonate frequency of vibration of your frame to something on the disc rotor. The rotor needs something irregular in its design to give a pulse to the frame. The 'something' could be number of holes on the rotor contact area or the number of arms that connect the rotor to the hub or even the number of bolts connecting the rotor to the hub. It might be made worse by brake set up.
    A fix is not easy but I would look to change the rotor style dramatically, magura rotor maybe? You could change the stiffness of the rear end by adding a bolt through axle. Have you tried asking specialized?
    When I had this on a enduro 2005 it turned up when I changed to a bolt through axle....

  15. #15
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    Try a solid sweep rear rotor (Avid 3GSS in my case). It worked on my 2011 Stumpjumper 29er Comp. It killed the interplay between the rotor and stays vibration resonance by getting outside of the frequency.

  16. #16
    Mountain Man Dan
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Barrett View Post
    Try a solid sweep rear rotor (Avid 3GSS in my case). It worked on my 2011 Stumpjumper 29er Comp. It killed the interplay between the rotor and stays vibration resonance by getting outside of the frequency.
    He already tried that..........

    I have tried EVERYTHING including ditching the Avid brakes and installing a set of Formulas. different pads, size rotors, different type rotors (even tried the solid rotor)
    The bike is nothing more then circles turning circles, It's the human motor that makes it elegant.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by ProjectDan35 View Post
    He already tried that..........

    OK....so it is time for your LBS to really get down and nasty with Specialized.....with clear documentation of EVERYTHING that you have tried. Your bike is essentially un-rideable.....in your opinion.

    There is probably nothing else that anyone here can do to help.

  18. #18
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    My Avids did that on my 2011 Epic 29er, dumped them for Formula R1s and never looked back. Since you said your Formulas do the same thing, I'm beginning to think it's something YOU are putting on them or doing do the brakes. Maybe some form of wash or liquid contamination, or perhaps something in some streams near you that you are riding through?

  19. #19
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    Cleaning rotors with Isopropyl alcohol can often quiet things down.........I've found.

  20. #20
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    FWIW

    I have a '11 Rockhopper SL that used to drive me crazy with the loud rear brake noise that happened every time, everywhere, whenever the brake was operated

    So, being the bike almost new and the owner fed to death with the big time noise that does not fit well with the very silent mountain trails we have here, I took it to a nearby Specialized "Concept store", where the owner, a seasoned expert in the business for not less than 20 years, tried anything including, changing pads, filing the borders os the pads, filing a line in the middle of the pad, changing disk and maybe something else all to no avail.

    When I got the bike back, I started to debug (sorry I am in the software industry) the problem myself discovering that when the resonance was in progress, touching the left seatstay with a foot stopped the noise immediately. That confirmed that the problem was not really in the pad+disk duo but rather in the frame itself.

    What solved completely the problem?? Taping a 40gr lead weight (those used for heavy fishing) in the middle of the left seat stay, with the purpose of moving the frame resonance point away.

    I've put more than 2000km on the bike since then, with no sign of resonance anymore

    happy biking

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by sneeboo View Post
    FWIW

    I have a '11 Rockhopper SL that used to drive me crazy with the loud rear brake noise that happened every time, everywhere, whenever the brake was operated

    So, being the bike almost new and the owner fed to death with the big time noise that does not fit well with the very silent mountain trails we have here, I took it to a nearby Specialized "Concept store", where the owner, a seasoned expert in the business for not less than 20 years, tried anything including, changing pads, filing the borders os the pads, filing a line in the middle of the pad, changing disk and maybe something else all to no avail.

    When I got the bike back, I started to debug (sorry I am in the software industry) the problem myself discovering that when the resonance was in progress, touching the left seatstay with a foot stopped the noise immediately. That confirmed that the problem was not really in the pad+disk duo but rather in the frame itself.

    What solved completely the problem?? Taping a 40gr lead weight (those used for heavy fishing) in the middle of the left seat stay, with the purpose of moving the frame resonance point away.

    I've put more than 2000km on the bike since then, with no sign of resonance anymore
    happy biking
    Interesting. I have the 2011 Rockhopper SL Expert 29 with Shimano brakes. Quiet as a mouse.

    On the other hand...my 2011 Stumpjumper 29er Comp HT rears screeched like an owl from day one. Went through all of the Avid changes and finally cured the problem with a G3SS solid rotor.

  22. #22
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    I have a 2011 Hardrock with shimano hydraulic disc brakes and it's silent. Squealed once due to lube contamination from the hubs, but became silent when the rear brake rotor was cleaned with dishwashing soap, rinse with water, then isopropyl alcohol. Maybe the heavier, thicker frame is more resistant to brake resonance

  23. #23
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    Yeah, now after almost a year of pain, mine is quiet as a mouse too and it is a *real* delight enjoying the power of disk brakes without a hiss

    I also believe that much of the problem on the rockhopper is due to the fact that the frame is relatively light and thin in some areas, helping this kind of problem together with the use of a low end factory brake system

    Like I said, in my case pad sanding, rounding, notching and even the disk sanding simply had no effect, go figure a simple isopropyl alcool cleaning...

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by sneeboo View Post
    FWIW

    I have a '11 Rockhopper SL that used to drive me crazy with the loud rear brake noise that happened every time, everywhere, whenever the brake was operated

    So, being the bike almost new and the owner fed to death with the big time noise that does not fit well with the very silent mountain trails we have here, I took it to a nearby Specialized "Concept store", where the owner, a seasoned expert in the business for not less than 20 years, tried anything including, changing pads, filing the borders os the pads, filing a line in the middle of the pad, changing disk and maybe something else all to no avail.

    When I got the bike back, I started to debug (sorry I am in the software industry) the problem myself discovering that when the resonance was in progress, touching the left seatstay with a foot stopped the noise immediately. That confirmed that the problem was not really in the pad+disk duo but rather in the frame itself.

    What solved completely the problem?? Taping a 40gr lead weight (those used for heavy fishing) in the middle of the left seat stay, with the purpose of moving the frame resonance point away.

    I've put more than 2000km on the bike since then, with no sign of resonance anymore

    happy biking
    There is a post in the Brake Forum about putting the sinker on the caliper. I guess it's the same principal.
    A garage full of steel frames means happiness.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by CS2 View Post
    There is a post in the Brake Forum about putting the sinker on the caliper. I guess it's the same principal.
    The rotors are causing a resonance that is of a frequency that the frame picks up on. Anything that changes the frequency will stop it....

  26. #26
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    Hi guys
    Had same noise changed rear pads and very little to no noise at all very happy. Tried everything in above post nothing helped this was my last shot before I buy a hole brake system.

    jensonusa.com/Brake-Pads/Serfas-Avid-Elixir-Disc-Brake-Pads

  27. #27
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    My fix (100%) for my Avid Elixir 7 SLs was to replace the rotors with Alligator Serration rotors from Pricepoint.com. I also used some brake quiet adhesive to "glue" the pads to the metal retaining spring. Absolutely fixed it. I was having terrible vibrations.
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    My bike is a 2011 Stumpjumper fsr comp and it has a terrible brake vibration too. The LBS replaced the front rotor with a larger Avid rotor, rear rotor and pads less then 20 miles ago. The vibration is back and sounds exactly the same prior to the work.

    The bike is washed using dish washing soap but do not clean the rotors with isoprolyn alcohol. I will try the alcohol and take the bike back to the LBS if this this does not work. Gut the feeling the LBS knows how to fix the issue, but is going through Avid to get it resolved by them under warrennty.
    2011 stumpjumper fsr comp 29er

  29. #29
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    robin..how much is your time worth? The rotors that fix this problem for me were ~$40 delivered. Sometimes you just have to bite the bullet, spend a few bucks (yes...even though this should all be covered by Avid or Specy..life isn't' always fair) and move on.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

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  30. #30
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    Has anyone contacted Specialized about this? I have a 2011 Stumpjumper Comp 29er that was quiet as a mouse until my first set of pads wore out. I replaced them with organic pads and ever since then the rear break sounds like a fog horn when it starts to get warm and the vibration will cause me to stop on a longer downhill just because it's driving me nuts.

    I guess the real question at hand is this a brake issue or something with the frame. I've been tempted to throw down some cash on a new XT for the rear brake but after reading this thread I'm afraid that the problem might still persist. How many of you have changed to a different brake set and still have problems? Does anyone have these same issues on non-specialized bikes? Interestingly enough my front brake (elixir 5 on 203 mm rotor) is silent. I've only had problems with the rear.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by regrap View Post
    Has anyone contacted Specialized about this? I have a 2011 Stumpjumper Comp 29er that was quiet as a mouse until my first set of pads wore out. I replaced them with organic pads and ever since then the rear break sounds like a fog horn when it starts to get warm and the vibration will cause me to stop on a longer downhill just because it's driving me nuts.

    I guess the real question at hand is this a brake issue or something with the frame. I've been tempted to throw down some cash on a new XT for the rear brake but after reading this thread I'm afraid that the problem might still persist. How many of you have changed to a different brake set and still have problems? Does anyone have these same issues on non-specialized bikes? Interestingly enough my front brake (elixir 5 on 203 mm rotor) is silent. I've only had problems with the rear.
    Did you follow the Avid bed-in procedure?

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Barrett View Post
    Did you follow the Avid bed-in procedure?
    Also note that there is an incompatibility between the Avid magnesium calipers and scintered metallic pads. I discovered this in the Avid technical docs.

  33. #33
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    I followed the prescribed bed in procedure by Avid. As for the pads my LBS recommended organic pads which are currently on the bike. I would hope they know what pads to recomend since they sale and service these types of brakes.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by regrap View Post
    I followed the prescribed bed in procedure by Avid. As for the pads my LBS recommended organic pads which are currently on the bike. I would hope they know what pads to recomend since they sale and service these types of brakes.
    Sorry my bad - the exclusion was only for the 2010-2011 Avid XX magnesium callipers. But, with due respect to your LBS I doubt that they are aware of the issue.

    It is covered in a footnote in the Avid Spare Parts catalogue for the 1st generation of XX and XXWC Elixir brakes in very fine print. To wit "*Do NOT use scintered metal brake pads with 2010-2011 XX and XX World Cup MAGNESIUM brake caliper!"

    Avid has recalled the XXWC brakes, and re-designed them completely for 2012. The exclusion doe not apply for the 2012 model.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by regrap View Post
    Has anyone contacted Specialized about this? I have a 2011 Stumpjumper Comp 29er that was quiet as a mouse until my first set of pads wore out. I replaced them with organic pads and ever since then the rear break sounds like a fog horn when it starts to get warm and the vibration will cause me to stop on a longer downhill just because it's driving me nuts.

    I guess the real question at hand is this a brake issue or something with the frame. I've been tempted to throw down some cash on a new XT for the rear brake but after reading this thread I'm afraid that the problem might still persist. How many of you have changed to a different brake set and still have problems? Does anyone have these same issues on non-specialized bikes? Interestingly enough my front brake (elixir 5 on 203 mm rotor) is silent. I've only had problems with the rear.
    Read my post above...Alligator rotors 100% shut my Avid brakes up on my Stumpy.
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  36. #36
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    Where did you buy the adapter for the smaller rotor? My stumpy currently has the 185mm rotor on the back whereas the alligator is 180mm. It sounds like a good alternative and relatively cheap compared to other options. Did you buy new pads when you put the rotor on? I'm relatively new to all this and want to make sure I don't ruin the new rotor with old pads.

  37. #37
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    I didn't need any adapters; mine has a 160 r. and a 180 f. so they were a direct replacement. I did replace the pads at the same time with Avid organics and bedded them in following Avid's procedure. I used some brake anti-squeal "glue" also to adhere the pads to the retainer spring.
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    I honnestly thought I was alone until I came across this!
    Let me ask you this. Does your bike do this vibration if your off the bike with the rear brake locked up when pushing or pulling it along a concrete surface?
    Mine does and the whole bike chatters along the concrete but none of my other bikes do they just drag along. This only gets worse when your riding and need the rear brake for something. I feel many people on here don't hear what your saying, talking about chain lube ect but trust me i hear you loud and clear i also feel your pain. What can this be? It Can't be brakes because mine will do it with the brake locked up and the bike dragging along pavement. Could it be the type of tire? My bike that has this issue is a ss 29er so there isn't much going on pretty simple stuff so I'm stuck thinking a tire pattern or a straight up frame issue. I've tightened everything and tried different tire pressures. I will try a new set of tires once I can justify spending that much for a bicycle tire. I can buy a new tire for my car for just a few bucks more lol.

  39. #39
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    My fix

    I had the same issue with a 2010 Enduro with Elixir CR's. First time around I tried several things at once including taking a file to the rotor to smooth the edges of the vent holes and adding a small amount of weight to the caliper, filing the leading edge of the brake pads, etc. Worked until I had to replace the pads.

    Replaced with sintered avid pads and new Avid rotor and the problem came back, maybe worse.

    I switched to Ashima SOS pads, sold by Origin8. Bed them in per Avids instructions. Took them on the trail and they were great, a little squeaky, but 90% better. During the first major downhill they squeaked a bit, then gave one final awful Hoooonnnnkkkkkk, and have been SILENT ever since.


    Link to the website, I bought them from amazon. I don't know if they give the best of both organic and metallic pads, but they work at least as well as the Avid metallics and are quiet.
    Products Description – ORIGIN-8

  40. #40
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    My HOOOOOOOONNNNNNKKKKKK!!!! came back.

    Originally solved by Kool Stop organics. Only change, took on & off rear wheel... we'll see what happens when I do that again.

    P

  41. #41
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    I just got back from a ride on my new setup. I was working with my LBS and they suggested a new rotor and new pads. I switched from the stock Avid G3 185mm on my back to a 160mm G2. I know it goes against everything that is preached, but I went from organic pads to metal scintered. I followed the Avid bed in procedures as best I could yesterday, and my ride today was relatively quiet. I had a little squeal from the brakes, but absolutely no vibrations or fog horn sounds on the downhill.

    Also, I guess I a rookie at this and my LBS said that the way that I was braking could have led to the problems that I was experiencing. I was just holding the brakes to keep a certain speed downhill, where they recommended allowing your bike to coast a bit and then come down hard on the brakes (front and back) to slow you down and then coast back up the speed. It sounds like this allows the brakes to stay much cooler and will extend the life of the pads hopefully alleviate any future problems.

    This was just my first ride on the new setup so I'm hoping that things continue to work the way they did today. If anything changes I'll update this post.

  42. #42
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    Guys, please read through the post. The fix is listed...Alligator Serration rotors and brake glue on the pad/spring contact. This fixes this problem for ~$40..period.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  43. #43
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    Take TiGeo's advice. Warble and vibration will be gone with the Alligator Serration rotors. Though, I went with EBC Gold pads instead of organic.
    Enjoy the ride!

  44. #44
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    Tech Tuesday - Silence That Squeaky Disc Brake - PinkbikeHas anybody just rode it out and done nothing? I have a 2010 enduro comp with avid elixir R Sl 180 rear, 203 front. First two rides were a dream. Gradually got squeaky when it was wet or dusty. Then after 6 weeks the back brake became a living hell whenever i held it down without locking up. I started coasting faster and hitting the lever harder because the vibration was so bad it hurt my nuts. This was on a particularly steep twisty dusty switchback downhill. It seemed a little better at the end of the ride. I washed my bike with the garden hose but just rinsing, not blasting and spraying hard. I dried the entire bike with a red shop towel and it never happened again. Everything is still stock. I have 135 qr rear hub which i keep REALLY TIGHT. I've had both brakes bled at seperate times, and occasionially self aligned the calipers if the rotors drag at all. I read a tech tuesday on pinkbike that addresses brake squeal and it mentioned break pad material depositing on the rotor. I think that's what happened to my brakes on yhat one twisty downhill. I'll post a link if possible.
    Tech Tuesday - Silence That Squeaky Disc Brake - Pinkbike
    Last edited by championp; 06-07-2012 at 11:08 PM. Reason: adding link to tech article

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by RCMTB View Post
    Take TiGeo's advice. Warble and vibration will be gone with the Alligator Serration rotors. Though, I went with EBC Gold pads instead of organic.
    The Alligator Serration Disc Brake Rotor has some issues:
    - They have less stopping power than the Avids
    - they are known to devour pads at a fast rate
    - they also overheat quicker than most

    If you are braking late as possible, or riding your brakes hard, the Alligator's are not a good solution. Search the forums, you'll read plenty of "tried them and went back". The rotors are cheap, and much lighter than standard rotors, if they worked as well as standard rotors, everyone would be rocking them.

    A common theme that is emerging is "less grab = less vibration"

    P

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.P View Post
    The Alligator Serration Disc Brake Rotor has some issues:
    - They have less stopping power than the Avids
    - they are known to devour pads at a fast rate
    - they also overheat quicker than most

    If you are braking late as possible, or riding your brakes hard, the Alligator's are not a good solution. Search the forums, you'll read plenty of "tried them and went back". The rotors are cheap, and much lighter than standard rotors, if they worked as well as standard rotors, everyone would be rocking them.

    A common theme that is emerging is "less grab = less vibration"

    P
    I noticed they seem to have less stopping power, but I found the Avid's to be too grabby slowing me down more than I want when cornering. So I'm thinking this setup will work well for my riding style. Only time will tell...
    Enjoy the ride!

  47. #47
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    This is so weird, I have the same thing on my new Stumpjumper hardtail. I've never heard such as noise. It's worse when braking pretty hard down real technical stuff. I was kind of hoping it would just go away (my bike is brand new, I've only been on 3 real rides so far), but doesn't sound like it.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by sneeboo View Post
    FWIW

    What solved completely the problem?? Taping a 40gr lead weight (those used for heavy fishing) in the middle of the left seat stay, with the purpose of moving the frame resonance point away.

    I've put more than 2000km on the bike since then, with no sign of resonance anymore

    happy biking
    I just want to report that, after another couple of months of continuous and rough use in any condition, still no sign of noise whatsoever with the above fix. My stumpy has become a joy to ride and I spent peanuts.

  49. #49
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    Pls repost the photo of the fix
    2011 stumpjumper fsr comp 29er

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by championp View Post
    Tech Tuesday - Silence That Squeaky Disc Brake - PinkbikeHas anybody just rode it out and done nothing? I have a 2010 enduro comp with avid elixir R Sl 180 rear, 203 front. First two rides were a dream. Gradually got squeaky when it was wet or dusty. Then after 6 weeks the back brake became a living hell whenever i held it down without locking up. I started coasting faster and hitting the lever harder because the vibration was so bad it hurt my nuts. This was on a particularly steep twisty dusty switchback downhill. It seemed a little better at the end of the ride. I washed my bike with the garden hose but just rinsing, not blasting and spraying hard. I dried the entire bike with a red shop towel and it never happened again. Everything is still stock. I have 135 qr rear hub which i keep REALLY TIGHT. I've had both brakes bled at seperate times, and occasionially self aligned the calipers if the rotors drag at all. I read a tech tuesday on pinkbike that addresses brake squeal and it mentioned break pad material depositing on the rotor. I think that's what happened to my brakes on yhat one twisty downhill. I'll post a link if possible.
    Tech Tuesday - Silence That Squeaky Disc Brake - Pinkbike
    I might give this a try. My bike ('11 Enduro Expert, CR sl brakes) was perfectly quiet the first few months I rode it -- no crazy long downhill runs or anything, but just fine on the 800' elevation laps I was doing. A long, hot, dusty and dry run down the Whole Enchilada (very dry conditions for mid-March) had my rear brakes acting a little funny by the end, but to be expected in light of how long and rough that trail can be. The rears were a little noisier the next ride out. Then, I took the bike to the resort for the first time on Friday. By the end of the second run, the vibration was sooo bad, I hardly wanted to hold on to the bars anymore. It would come and go (usually start up, then I'd let go of the rear, then grab it again and sometimes it would stop, sometimes vibrate again). Not a lot of turkey gobble or shrieking, but just a strong vibration and associated noise. Did this the rest of the day.

    Then, a quick early Sat am ride, just a 1000' climb and descent, and my rear brake was howing from the first minute of the downhill, and howled all the way down. Not so much vibration this time.

    Front has been nice and quiet throughout all of this, aside from a couple shrieks at the end of a long dh run (which I expect and can live with -- the rear vibration is another thing, though -- not acceptable!).
    '11 Specialized Enduro Expert for the trails
    '13 Felt Z4 for the road

  51. #51
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    Check out this thread.

    Stumpjumper Brake Squealing

  52. #52
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    After my ride this weekend the Alligator rotors and EBC Gold pads worked great. No noise or vibration. Also, stopping power got better as the pads\rotors broke-in. I am sold on this fix. I didn't even glue the pad to the spring.
    Enjoy the ride!

  53. #53
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    Finally!!! A permanent solution to the vibration on my Avid Elixir 5 rear brake system.

    I have tried everything in this thread and many other suggestions short of replacing the callipers and levers.

    My girl friend has a similar bike to me, but with Shimano brakes, and her bike has never had any problems with brake vibrations. So I took a closer look and the Shimano brake and noticed that the pistons in the brake callipers are quite different.

    The solution I found is to exchange the Avid Elixir 5 calliper pistons with the Shimano BR-M585 calliper pistons. I also exchanged the rubber O-ring seal inside the calliper piston housing to make the calliper piston fit properly.

    So far no vibrations from the rear brake... in fact the front brake which was always relatively quiet is more noisy now.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean_69 View Post
    Finally!!! A permanent solution to the vibration on my Avid Elixir 5 rear brake system.

    I have tried everything in this thread and many other suggestions short of replacing the callipers and levers.

    My girl friend has a similar bike to me, but with Shimano brakes, and her bike has never had any problems with brake vibrations. So I took a closer look and the Shimano brake and noticed that the pistons in the brake callipers are quite different.

    The solution I found is to exchange the Avid Elixir 5 calliper pistons with the Shimano BR-M585 calliper pistons. I also exchanged the rubber O-ring seal inside the calliper piston housing to make the calliper piston fit properly.

    So far no vibrations from the rear brake... in fact the front brake which was always relatively quiet is more noisy now.
    What? You replaced pistons in the caliper housing?

  55. #55
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    Yes... I replaced the pistons in the calliper housing.

    The Avid calliper pistons are just a single solid piece of metal while the Shimano are two pieces with a smaller part fitting into the metal piston piece with an O-ring around it for damping.

    Seems to be the only real difference in the two brake systems. I theorise that the insert allows the brake pads to settle against the brake disk as it want and allows some movement, where as the Avid system is too rigid... just my theory...

    So far works very well and absolutely no noise or vibrations, so very happy for this economic solution.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Brake vibration resonance.  has anyone got long term fix?-dsc03507.jpg  

    Brake vibration resonance.  has anyone got long term fix?-dsc03509.jpg  


  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean_69 View Post
    Yes... I replaced the pistons in the calliper housing.

    The Avid calliper pistons are just a single solid piece of metal while the Shimano are two pieces with a smaller part fitting into the metal piston piece with an O-ring around it for damping.

    Seems to be the only real difference in the two brake systems. I theorise that the insert allows the brake pads to settle against the brake disk as it want and allows some movement, where as the Avid system is too rigid... just my theory...

    So far works very well and absolutely no noise or vibrations, so very happy for this economic solution.
    I would guess that what either the changing of the mass of the piston was enough to "detune" the harmonics causing the noise, or there is a better (different?) connection to the pads...

  57. #57
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    Exactly what has changed or improved is hard to say... but from riding the bike with both types of calliper pistons it seems to feel as if there is more sensitivity with the Shimano calliper pistons. The range between starting to brake and locking the back wheel has increased. In comparison to the front brake with the original Avid calliper pistons the back brake is much softer... just what you want... the back wheel does not lock up so quickly.

    The vibrations I had on my bike... Trek 6700 2010... was only under progressive braking mainly on steep hills -6% and more. The vibration was sometimes controllable by releasing the brake and then braking again.

    I theorise further... It would seem that the vibrations, with the Avid calliper piston, come from the movement of the brake pad between the calliper piston and the disk, in the direction of the rotating disk. With the Shimano calliper pistons, the insert allows there to be some movement by the brake pad in the direction of the rotating disk and therefore no vibration... just another theory of mine. ;-)

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean_69 View Post

    I theorise further... It would seem that the vibrations, with the Avid calliper piston, come from the movement of the brake pad between the calliper piston and the disk, in the direction of the rotating disk. With the Shimano calliper pistons, the insert allows there to be some movement by the brake pad in the direction of the rotating disk and therefore no vibration... just another theory of mine. ;-)
    I doubt that there is any movement between the pad and the piston. The usual cause of squealing is uneven deposits on the rotors which sets up a resonance through the pads and calliper to the frame. I'm thinking that the different pistons have a different resonant frequency which stops the propagation. Sort of like the guy in this thread who strapped a 40gm weight to the chainstay and also stopped the noise....

  59. #59
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    This was my fix and I tried everything. Different rotors and several bake pad manufactures.

    http://www.jensonusa.com/Brake-Pads/...isc-Brake-pads


    Thanks Michael

  60. #60
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    I have a 2011 stumpjumper ss with Elixir R SLs and have had a problem with the loud squeal and frame vibration with the rear bike since I got the bike. I haven't read through the whole thread so I don't know if anyone has mentioned this "fix." Its a fix and not a solution because it is far from ideal.

    What I did was wrap a bolt (maybe weighs an ounce) in electric tape and then taped it to the non drive side seat stay about half way up.

    I had my first ever silent ride on this bike yesterday. I was in heaven.

    Like I said it is less than ideal but hopefully it is just temporary until I can up grade my braking system.
    Brake vibration resonance.  has anyone got long term fix?-imageuploadedbytapatalk1340566844.901083.jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Brake vibration resonance.  has anyone got long term fix?-imageuploadedbytapatalk1340566767.481586.jpg  


  61. #61
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    You can also buy lead tape, for a more discreet look. That would be my choice.
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  62. #62
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    I have the same issue with my 2012 Rockhopper. It started with the front brake on about the second ride. A turkey warble and vibration that was irritating but did not seem to affect rideability or stopping power. The LBS said it was worn bushings in the front fork (BALONEY!). Then it spread to the rear brake after about 10 rides. After a wash down, the bike is quieter and the vibration is only a mild irritant. When I get to it I will try cleaning with alchohol.

    My wife's 2012 Safire, which has completely different brakes (Avid Elixer 7SL) does the same thing, not severe and she barely notices it.

    I have to wonder whether this problem is in part due to inexperienced riders that tend to ride the brakes on downhills rather than braking only when necessary. I learned not to do this earlier this year, after my brake noise issues started. I will try the weight on the frame to see if it has any effect.

  63. #63
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    Same issue with mine. Still looking for a solution. After trying different brakes, pads, rotors, rotor size and adjusting the banjo down (as Avid suggested) I am still having no luck. May have to try an Alligator rotor. I have them on my SS and like them quite a bit.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zakman View Post
    What I did was wrap a bolt (maybe weighs an ounce) in electric tape and then taped it to the non drive side seat stay about half way up.
    Quote Originally Posted by Stevob View Post
    You can also buy lead tape, for a more discreet look. That would be my choice.
    I was wondering about these two different approaches, and wondering how the lead tape would work (since that would look much cleaner).

    I'm suspecting though that you need a mass that blocks (absorbs) the resonance, and that the tape might not quite work - at least not as well as the bolt in a single spot.

    Any engineers want to chime in here?

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by cbatenga View Post
    You need to file the edges of the brake pad lining, clean and lube the backing plate and piston, go out an ride.
    you guys really crack me up!

  66. #66
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    OK FOLKS! LISTEN UP>>>>

    I want you all to try this. if you have a RESONANCE vibration. NOT a squeek, or a turkey noise, etc.... but a hellacious fog horn vibration that goes through the frame of the entire bike. and NOTHING that you do seems to fix it. TRY THIS!

    This is the FIX for my FSR. If you take it off, the noise comes back. if you wrap it back up, it is cured.

    NOTE> I have tried EVERYTHING including switching the entire brake system to another brand (Formula)

    I have about 30-40 rides on this now. I just did Cannell Plunge in Kernville and my brakes where silent.

    Just get some inner tube or some stretchy rubber velcro kinda thing would work great. WRAP the two chainstays pulling the innertube so there is some tension pulling the chain stays towards each other. find a way to make it stay put. THIS WORKS.

    Please try it and report back. even if you have a hardtail, I'm curious if it works for you too.

    This is totally a FRAME DESIGN PROBLEM.

    yes, this is ugly. but I will work on that later. However, a lot lighter than putting a fishing weight or bolt on your frame.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Brake vibration resonance.  has anyone got long term fix?-brake-fix.jpg  


  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarlS View Post
    OK FOLKS! LISTEN UP>>>>

    I want you all to try this...
    This did absolutely nothing for me. No difference whatsoever. I gave it a couple shots, tried a couple different ways and in the end just wasted a lot of time.

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch rides a SS View Post
    This did absolutely nothing for me. No difference whatsoever. I gave it a couple shots, tried a couple different ways and in the end just wasted a lot of time.
    which bike? was it a hardtail?

  69. #69
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    2011 Stumpy FSR

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zakman View Post
    I have a 2011 stumpjumper ss with Elixir R SLs...
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	ImageUploadedByTapatalk1340566844.901083.jpg 
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    I've also tried this as well without any noticable changes in braking feel or noise. I do have a couple other ideas for this, though, that I will be trying in the next few days. I will post up anything that helps.

  71. #71
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    bummer. hmmm, maybe my cure is a combo of the things I have done.

    (I do have formula brakes with an aligator rotor)

    but it still did it until I got an innertube and wrapped it several times around the stays. and really pulled it tight so there is good tension on the rubber bands.


    sorry if it didn't fix ya, but i am stoked. did 8 miles of pure downhill on Cannell trail in kernville and it worked just great for me.

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by phlegm View Post
    I was wondering about these two different approaches, and wondering how the lead tape would work (since that would look much cleaner).

    I'm suspecting though that you need a mass that blocks (absorbs) the resonance, and that the tape might not quite work - at least not as well as the bolt in a single spot.

    Any engineers want to chime in here?
    What might work better than lead tape is the adhesive lead wheel weights that some automotive tyre fitters use. You might need to bend them into shape before applying, but it's lead, so it should be pretty pliable. Just pop into a tyre fitters with a couple of bucks and you should be good to go.
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  73. #73
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    Lead weights

    Hello. My first post here. I have a Giant XTC that was suffering from the annoying rear brake howl. I want to report that I was able to stop the vibration by fixing half a strip (42 grams) of lead weights like the ones used to balance model airplanes halfway of the left seat stay, facing the wheel. I used Great Planes P/N GPMQ4485. I painted them to match the color of the frame and they are almost unnoticeable. Now I am thinking that perhaps some kind of sound-proofing compound such as QuietCoat or QuietCar can be poured inside the seat stay to make the repair more discrete and permanent.
    Last edited by JohnnyCab; 07-01-2012 at 08:38 PM.

  74. #74
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    It would be nice to hear something from Specialized about this. At least that they are working on finding a fix. My brake vibration comes from the brake pads, not a frame resonance issue, but it is a minor annoyance in my case. Nowhere near as troublesome as my rear derailleur which has now gotten itself wrapped in the spokes on two successive rides.

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jfloren View Post
    Nowhere near as troublesome as my rear derailleur which has now gotten itself wrapped in the spokes on two successive rides.
    I believe there's a cure for that too.
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  76. #76
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    I have 2 fixes that have worked well for me. One happened on its own, the other I was actually trying to do.

    I have a 2012 Stumpy Evo that came with the Formula The One brakes. Super powerful, great modulation, but they got noisy over time. They eventually got so noisy that my frame began to vibrate as well.

    Long story short, through riding and my own stupidity, I bent both of my rotors. I didn't care for the price to replace my rotors with another set of Formulas so I bought some Ashima rotors. I've used these rotors in the past with good results. In addition, I didn't feel like buying Formula brake pads and felt like just trying some other ones. I found these pretty cheap on Ebay.
    4Prs/8 F1 Sintered Formula Mega The One Disc Brake Pads | eBay
    At that price, I assumed they were going to be average to horrible. Why did I buy them? I'm a glutton for punishment who also hopes that this is one of those times that you can still get a decent deal on a quality product. Turns out, this is one of those times (not to worry, I'm sure I'll be burned in the near future on some other 'good deal' purchase).

    The F1 pads coupled with the Ashima rotors took away all noise from my rear brake, and the stopping power and modulation is just as good as stock. I'm also not noticing any brake fade over my rides so everything seems to be normal other than I have no noise.

    So my rear brake pads were toast but my fronts still had plenty of meat on them. Even though I knew changing the pads would more than likely give the same effect as I got on the rear, I stuck with the Formula pads on the front to just use them up until they were done as well. My front brake was noisy and vibrated my bike before when I was using the Formula rotor. The used Formula pads coupled with the new Ashima rotor was ridiculously loud, like, you could hear me braking a couple of miles away loud. Instead of changing the pads I decided this would be a good opportunity to try out that Squeal Out product that I bought awhile back. I forgot I had it then noticed it while I was looking for some tools. I was pretty much blown away by this stuff. Absolute silence from my brake once I applied it. Took me all of 15 minutes from start to finish. I also got all of my braking power to come back once I cleaned it off after the application. If my brakes ever act up again, I'll just use this stuff again. Seriously, I was amazed. It worked just like it does in their youtube video.
    How To Stop Disc Brake Squeal - YouTube

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean_69 View Post
    Yes... I replaced the pistons in the calliper housing.

    The Avid calliper pistons are just a single solid piece of metal while the Shimano are two pieces with a smaller part fitting into the metal piston piece with an O-ring around it for damping.

    Seems to be the only real difference in the two brake systems. I theorise that the insert allows the brake pads to settle against the brake disk as it want and allows some movement, where as the Avid system is too rigid... just my theory...

    So far works very well and absolutely no noise or vibrations, so very happy for this economic solution.
    Did you order the Shimano caliper piston assy. through a shop? Do you have the P/N's handy?

  78. #78
    J-Flo
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    Quote Originally Posted by cycljunkie View Post
    Did you order the Shimano caliper piston assy. through a shop? Do you have the P/N's handy?
    Warning, it is a terrible idea to shove Shimano pistons into an Avid brake caliper, especially given that they are different dimensions. Vibration can't be as bad as your brakes possibly failing altogether, and there are many other, safer suggestions here about how to stop the dreaded brake noise.

  79. #79
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    I wonder how the shimano pistons will last with DOT fluid.

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by cycljunkie View Post
    Did you order the Shimano caliper piston assy. through a shop? Do you have the P/N's handy?
    I found the complete Shimano brake caliper on ebay for about €20. The part number is the Shimano BR-M585.

    And for those doubters 1385km, 23200m, 80hours, 41500kcal later, still quiet as a mouse and no oil leaks!

  81. #81
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    Sounds crazy but

    Have been breaking frames for a while now, the latest was a Giant XTC1 - probably 2009 or 10 model - and was replaced by a 2011 or 12 model. Running Avid Elixer 5 brakes. Got the frame replaced under warranty and the load vibrations started on the rear brake. Adjusted everything and nothing would work. I saw the posts below that talked about frame resonance and strapping bolts, tying inner tubes on and around the rear stays. In desperation I found three fishing sinkers in the garage and taped them to the mid-point of the rear stay - that was all I did. Ride this morning - braking as hard as I can - no vibration! Unbelievable!

    In my mind you cannot blame a frame for this - these brakes are good at stopping, but the front vibrates in the wet and with the problems with the rear, I am looking at getting Shimano.

  82. #82
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    A solution from Trek

    Here is Trek's solution to rear brake vibration.

    The white bike is a Trek 6700 2010

    The yellow bike is a Trek 9.8 2012... no vibration at all. But it also has Shimano brakes not Avid.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Brake vibration resonance.  has anyone got long term fix?-dsc04212.jpg  

    Brake vibration resonance.  has anyone got long term fix?-dsc04210.jpg  


  83. #83
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    My rear sequel and vibrations issues were solved on my 08 stumpy by replacing my Avid Juicy 5 with Hope Tech X2s brake system. Pricey fix, but worth every penny. Im thinking about the Hope M4's which have more power than the X2's for my 2012 Stumpy after my avids are shot.

  84. #84
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    I have an '11 Enduro comp that had terrible brake resonance issues. It was particularly bad when braking hard on downhill runs. It would shake the whole frame, and could be felt right up to the grips. Everything I did worked for a ride or two then it would come back.

    I fixed my brake resonance issues by putting a set of XT's on (calibers and disks). I got a killer deal from Wiggle and havn't be happier!

    I had similar issues on my '06 Stumpy with juicy's on it. Never replaced the brakes though. I just dealt with the problem.

  85. #85
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    My Stumpjumper Evo started the foghorn thing again today. Has been quiet for a long time now, but today it is cold. 55 degrees. Does the weather have something to do with it? It starts after I hit a bump, brakes are not applied. Usually stops when I apply the brakes.

  86. #86
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    I think I posted this earlier in this thread but I am too lazy to find it and re-post. I fooled around with this issue for weeks until I found the one thing that works iron clad guaranteed. Take some electrical tape and tape a string of 5 segments of model airplane weights to the seat stay on the brake side halfway between the axle and the first pivot up the seat stay.

    This is the easiest fastest way to fix this problem. Forget the additional weight, its nothing in the scheme of things. Each segment weighs 1/4 oz so with 5 you are looking at 1.25 oz's.

    Here is a link to the lead weights:

    TowerHobbies.com | Great Planes Segmented Lead Weights 6 oz

  87. #87
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    I had this problem on SS carve. It was terrible and I took Stumpjumper61 advice and it worked perfect. All vibration stop and the brakes are perfectly quiet. I also added some 1/4 oz. weights near the caliper. I can't believe how easy the fix was.

    Erik

  88. #88
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    G3SS rotors on rear and proper break in. Solid sweep rotors vibrate less.

  89. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laterilus View Post
    I have a 2012 Stumpy Evo that came with the Formula The One brakes. Super powerful, great modulation, but they got noisy over time. They eventually got so noisy that my frame began to vibrate as well.
    This is what confuses me with this issue. While some frames may be affected right away, for the most part the vibrating/Turkey gobbling seems to develop over time, right? (At least it did for me.)

    I would have thought resonance was built into the equation from day 1, based on frame material, geometry, and component mix, rider weight, etc., etc.

    If it gradually shows up, you'd then suspect a change to the equation like rotor build-up, brake angle, piston movement etc. Something looser/tighter on the frame.

    But some of us (including myself) have changed rotors, bled brakes, adjusted brakes, bought new brakes, etc., without a fix.

    Any scientific explanations out there? Maybe the frame itself is flexing/changing slightly with use?

  90. #90
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    For what it's worth on my 2013 Stumpjumper expert evo carbon I replaced the Avid xo trail brakes with Shimano Xt's and all the noise went away. Mine was a BAD vibration and honking noise from day 1. No more noise and an excellent bike now, as well as the Shimano's just feel better.

  91. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by bedell99 View Post
    I had this problem on SS carve. It was terrible and I took Stumpjumper61 advice and it worked perfect. All vibration stop and the brakes are perfectly quiet. I also added some 1/4 oz. weights near the caliper. I can't believe how easy the fix was.

    Erik
    I have XT's on my Carve and they've been silent from day one.

    Seems like after reading a few posts in this thread that the Shimano brakes don't contribute to the vibration.
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by verdugomountainlocal View Post
    For what it's worth on my 2013 Stumpjumper expert evo carbon I replaced the Avid xo trail brakes with Shimano Xt's and all the noise went away. Mine was a BAD vibration and honking noise from day 1. No more noise and an excellent bike now, as well as the Shimano's just feel better.
    I have the same frame and the shop I bought it from is working with both Sram and Spec to come up with a fix. We are going to try a 6" rear rotor to see if that works. If that fails then Spec has said they will send out a new set of brakes.
    My son ( who is a mechanic at the shop I purchased the bike at ) and I were riding yesterday and we happened to run into someone high up in the mtn bike division at Specialized. He took photos of my ghetto vibration fix ( tube wrapping from the chain to the seat stays ) and said that they have had meetings about this very issue.
    I refuse to spend money to fix an issue on a brand new 2013 bike that is not working properly.

  93. #93
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    Sram sent out a new 6" rotor and pads and so far it seems to have fixed my problem.

  94. #94
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    I've been thinking a lot about what you guys are doing with the weights & tape on the seatstays, which has been great info - thanks for that.

    So I tried something a bit different.

    I cut the zip tie that holds the brake line on the seatstay. Mine was very tight and held the brake line solidly against the frame.

    I reattached the brake line with a loose zip tie. With the idea that if vibration is in the brake line, it cannot transfer the vibration to the chain stay. That is the theory...

    In one ride, it seemed to help a lot as the vibration is 90% gone. However, it was just 1 ride, on a bike I had not ridden in months, and on a wet trail. So maybe there is no benefit.

    Regardless, it is a free, 2 minute try. If you try it, I'd like to hear your results.

    P

  95. #95
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    Hi,
    I have a 2010 large frame Specialized Stumpjumper fsr elite.
    As a lot of people through out the world I had frame vibration issues.
    Just recently I was able to solve this problem. I've done everything, I've contacted Formula (my brakes are Formula RX 2011 with original pads and rotors) and followed all the instructions that were given with no result. I've sent my bike to different bicycle shops in Lisbon and no one as a clue of the resolution for this issue - everyone (from Formula itself to bike experts) thought this vibration was caused by the brake system.
    After a lot of mistakes and time spent around the problem I started to ask that the problem itself is caused by the frame - for what I've searched a lot of your models have this issue.
    I've verified all possible leaks (bearings, rear suspension, etc) and everything was good. Then I realized this was due to resonance frequency (the relation between the brake system and the frame itself) - although this is thought to be solved with the replacement of the brake system, other people with the same frame as mine but with different brakes still have this problem.
    The solution is to modify the brake system cable from the normal setting to a more direct "straight" way (as you can see in the photos bellow).

    http://imageshack.us/a/img208/5070/8q81.jpg

    http://imageshack.us/a/img10/5784/paqa.jpg

    http://imageshack.us/a/img24/1129/njj5.jpg

    I have been cycling with no vibration since this modification.

  96. #96
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    Just an update: 2013 Stumpy Expert Evo Carbon 29 with XT M785 brakes. Tried everything including new ice tech rotors, pads, sanding, bleed, etc. Ice techs helped considerably, especially with the squeal but the vibration was still there. What appears to have fixed the problem for me is removing the small brake hose clamp on the inside of the left hand chain stay that holds the hose to it. This makes sense in my head, as that is the only other point of attachment other than the brake caliper. I can prove the cause and effect relationship by removing it and putting it back on, so for any of you who were as desperate as I was, its worth a shot.

  97. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by faip22thedoc View Post
    What appears to have fixed the problem for me is removing the small brake hose clamp on the inside of the left hand chain stay that holds the hose to it... I can prove the cause and effect relationship by removing it and putting it back on, so for any of you who were as desperate as I was, its worth a shot.
    Thanks for posting that up, that is what I found as well.

    Except I reattached the brake line with a loose zip tie so the vibration does not get transmitted to the frame on both chain and seat stays.

    P

  98. #98
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    The last couple of posts are showing that a vibration is coming from an Avid brake hose and transmitted into the frame which amplifies the sound.

    Other brakes may not have this issue, but a fix can be as easy as a loose interface with the hose on the chain & seat stays.

    Costs less than pad, rotors, & new brakes. Takes 5 minutes. And silence.

    P

  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.P View Post
    Except I reattached the brake line with a loose zip tie so the vibration does not get transmitted to the frame on both chain and seat stays.

    P
    Hi,
    This didn't help me. The vibration changed from the handlebar to the seatpost...
    The only way to have it with no vibration is to have the brake line attached only on the seat stay (as you can see in the photos).
    Did you loose the brake line in the down tube too, or just on both chain and seat stays?
    Thanks for posting

  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.P View Post
    The last couple of posts are showing that a vibration is coming from an Avid brake hose and transmitted into the frame which amplifies the sound.

    Other brakes may not have this issue, but a fix can be as easy as a loose interface with the hose on the chain & seat stays.

    Costs less than pad, rotors, & new brakes. Takes 5 minutes. And silence.

    P
    I have been contending with this problem on my Salsa Mukluk for a year and a half, and have even gone so far as to have Salsa warranty my frame. The problem started with a set of Elixer CR's and now on a set of XT's. My shop and I have tried EVERYTHING. If this solves my problem, I owe you a six pack!

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