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  1. #1
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    Avid Ultimate 7 on Enduro SL

    Just picked up an Enduro SL and though I haven't had too many opportunities to ride it properly yet, I have had plenty of opportunities to take the wheels off and on for packing in the car (travelling).

    Rode the bike yesterday and realized a vibration in the whole rear end of the bike under heavy braking. Has anyone experienced this before? I have no idea what it is. I've checked the both wheels are seated properly, the brake levels feel fine. Am I burning the rotors in or is something else going on?

    Otherwise a damn cool bike. Green 08 expert.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by rick w.
    Just picked up an Enduro SL and though I haven't had too many opportunities to ride it properly yet, I have had plenty of opportunities to take the wheels off and on for packing in the car (travelling).

    Rode the bike yesterday and realized a vibration in the whole rear end of the bike under heavy braking. Has anyone experienced this before? I have no idea what it is. I've checked the both wheels are seated properly, the brake levels feel fine. Am I burning the rotors in or is something else going on?

    Otherwise a damn cool bike. Green 08 expert.
    yes the " HONKING " or vibration is from the organic brake pads that are used in the 08 sl ---.

    i had to go to the Koolstoop pads with the aluminum backing plates in the rear to stop it.

    i run one Koolstop pad and one organic pad in the ft .

    as with any bike it takes awhile to find what works for you in your conditions ,-------

    i also had to change the brake fluid to the 600 degree motul high temp fluid.

    i could fade the stock dot 4 and or dot 5.1 fluid quickly

  3. #3
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    Wow. Would love to avoid engaging in rocket science on this. With the price of the bike one would expect that things "just work"...

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by rick w.
    Wow. Would love to avoid engaging in rocket science on this. With the price of the bike one would expect that things "just work"...
    i hear you Rick , it should all just work perfectly .

    but there are to many variables in the way the bike will be used . weight, style, conditions, types of dirt , moisture , oxygen due to altitude ---------and don't even get me started on some of the spray cleaners and lubes guys spray on their bike ----( which all go right on the rotors and into the pads ) --.

    as with any high end peice of racing macheinery , ----one must be prepaired to test alot of componets and disassemble and clean and reassemble many many times before getting the bike and rider will work as one unit with no glitches.

    its not uncommon to spend $6,000 on a CRF450 and another 10K and a 4 months of testing to get the bike and rider to become one .

    a bicycle is not as bad as a MX bike of course -----but there will be many things that will be needing changing and dialing if you really rip on the things and want perfection .

  5. #5
    Fat Skis/Fat Tires
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    Quote Originally Posted by rick w.
    Wow. Would love to avoid engaging in rocket science on this. With the price of the bike one would expect that things "just work"...
    I've been fighting that same aggravating Avid honking for about a year now, and finally got ahold of it. Right after I got it, I switched out the Juicy 5's that my SL came with, and threw on some Juicy 7's.

    What I finally did was purchase a $15 rotor tool from Park and true the rotor up by looking down onto the caliper from above, and making little tweeks until the reveal (the space between the rotor and the pad) was even, and I no longer had any rubbing on either pad throughout the entire revolution of the wheel.

    Then I loosened the CPS bolts (the two bolts that hold the caliper to the mount) until the caliper floated freely, squeezed the lever for the rear brake a couple times, then held it firmly (per caliper allignment procedure) while slowly tightening the CPS bolts a little at a time, and being careful to not move the caliper.

    I had my first 3+ hour ride on Saturday without a single honk. I have exorcised the demon!!

  6. #6
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    The rotor had some points where it was dragging but I think I solved them with the caliper alignment procedure you describe. I rode the bike again last night (3rd ride) after getting it home (lots of traveling with the bike in a plastic box). Surprise - no honking or vibration.

    Not sure if its gone for good but the brakes were used pretty hard on some very technical downhill sections.

    Thanks for the tips but it could be that my case was a simple one I hope.

  7. #7
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    There's an entire thread over in the brakes section on Juicy 7's honking. It seems that there a bunch of "fixes". I had some vibration a few rides ago, but it seems to have subsided on its own.

    John
    Big Strings, Big Wheels, The Jisch Blog

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