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  1. #1
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    Avid Juicy 5 Braking power

    Well we had my wife's Safire for a week now and the braking is not like my Stumpy Elite. We have used the brakes alot in past week and it still just slows her down, no skidding just slows her down. With mine I can skid and do endos but with hers she just slows down. I know with my 7's I can adjust contact point of the pads but cant figure how to make hers stop more powerfully. I am going on a trail tomorrow and want to do it myself instead of bring to the shop as it is not on my way. can I get some suggestions? Thanks...

  2. #2
    Bike to the Bone...
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    Quote Originally Posted by gigabyte772
    Well we had my wife's Safire for a week now and the braking is not like my Stumpy Elite. We have used the brakes alot in past week and it still just slows her down, no skidding just slows her down. With mine I can skid and do endos but with hers she just slows down. I know with my 7's I can adjust contact point of the pads but cant figure how to make hers stop more powerfully. I am going on a trail tomorrow and want to do it myself instead of bring to the shop as it is not on my way. can I get some suggestions? Thanks...
    I think that's the way brakes should work, slow you down, not make you skid.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by rzozaya1969
    I think that's the way brakes should work, slow you down, not make you skid.
    I guess that's true, but that's not how i like my brakes. When applying full power, i want my brakes to send me flying over the handlebars and into a pine tree. Uber powerful brakes make me go (drooling smiley)

  4. #4
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    did you bed in the brakes? since its a new bike the rotors may still have some gaps to fill. thats what jumps out to me why it would not work so great. other than the millions of micro adjustments.

  5. #5
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    What is bed in the brakes and how do you do it?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by gigabyte772
    What is bed in the brakes and how do you do it?
    take the bike up a long hill and bomb it. towards the end brake hard. the whole idea here... your rotor has microscopic gaps in it that lower the surface area/ contact area for your brake pads. by braking really hard with your brakes, you are using the resin from the resin pads to fill in these microscopic gaps. do the bed in process a few times and your brakes should be working better. its also a good idea to do this after you clean your rotors with rubbing alcohol.

    as for the juicy 3's being not so bitey, i dont think that should happen. i have low end mechanical disc brakes and they'll send me over the bars if i squeeze hard enough.

  7. #7
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    The stopping power of my Juicy Fives on my new ride (from an another manufacturer) were so bad that I suspected they were contaminated, in addition to being dangerous. Cleaned the rotors with rubbing alcohol, removed and rubbed the pads on a flat peice of med sandpaper. Then I broke them in by lightly dragging the front brake and riding for about 10 seconds. Then a firm stop, ride 30 sec to cool and repeat second step 2 or 3 times.Then repeat procedure for the rear brake. Now my brakes are great.

    The purpose is to have the irregular surfaces of the pad and rotor wear together to form 100% surface contact (no gaps if you were to look at it through a microscope). When done successfully you'll need less squeezing and travel at the lever, and your brakes won't squeel or shudder.

  8. #8
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    How do you take the pads out? Thanks...

  9. #9
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    my rear juicy five overheated on a downhill, resulting in the brake not working, had to remove pads, cleaning in meths, burning meths off and reinstalling,

    i am a bit scared of using the brake too much now as i dont wanna do the same again, the downhill it occured on was not especially extreme or lengthy,

  10. #10
    jason8265
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    I dumped the organic pads for sintered metal pads and the improvement was huge.

  11. #11
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    Yeah, organics are gonna give you a less grabby more linear feel, a bit less overall power. Sintered metal pads will maximize your power, but may make the brakes grabby or ramp up too quickly. If you don't like either, try putting in an organic on one side of the brake and a sintered metal on the other side.

    I really like the Juicy 5's on my Enduro SL Comp. They've got whatever pads came stock, which feel organic to me. Anyways, as already suggested, try resetting your wifes rotors with the alchohol cleaning and some sandpaper. Then re-bed them and you may be suprised. Pay special attention to the rear brake as it is harder to bed properly. My rear brake is grabbier than I'd like, but I'm too lazy to fix it >_>

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