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  1. #1
    hbrogan57
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    Any Suggestions???

    I recently purchased this Rockhopper. I was wondering if anyone had suggestions as to what I can add to the bike. I am a day to day rider and use this as a commuter bike. I do have plans for panniers already. But what else would you suggest?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Any Suggestions???-dsc05365.jpg  


  2. #2
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    Hey Hbrogan57,

    That's a pretty flashy bike!

    Here is a super recommendation for you:
    - I see you've got barends on your bike. I have a non-conventional setup with my barends that works extremely well: rotate your barends so they point directly back at you (maybe angled up just a tad), and switch them left to right so they angle outward instead of inward. Cover them with the fat foam grips that you can sometimes get at department stores. I really should post a pic. You might have to adjust the height by getting a higher rise bar or stem, or maybe not. You will be amazed at how comfortable this setup works. I tried it when I sprained my back and found that I get mega-pulling power with my hands in that position. Further, it's a much more comfortable position, all around. I commute with my hands in that position 99% of the time, the other 1% is when I need to brake or when I need to do technical steering when I'm offroading.
    - Narrower tires. If you're riding pavement, get rid of those mountain bike tires. Get 1.25 - 1.50" tires with the appropriate tubes and run them at 60+ psi.

  3. #3
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
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    Rigid fork. Depending on how much you want to spend, you can get a perfectly good steel fork from Surly or Kona for under $100, or something fancier in steel or carbon fiber for more. Match your steer tube size, and look for one that's corrected for the amount of travel you have on your suspension fork.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  4. #4
    hbrogan57
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    Thanks!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Blabbing
    Hey Hbrogan57,

    That's a pretty flashy bike!

    Here is a super recommendation for you:
    - I see you've got barends on your bike. I have a non-conventional setup with my barends that works extremely well: rotate your barends so they point directly back at you (maybe angled up just a tad), and switch them left to right so they angle outward instead of inward. Cover them with the fat foam grips that you can sometimes get at department stores. I really should post a pic. You might have to adjust the height by getting a higher rise bar or stem, or maybe not. You will be amazed at how comfortable this setup works. I tried it when I sprained my back and found that I get mega-pulling power with my hands in that position. Further, it's a much more comfortable position, all around. I commute with my hands in that position 99% of the time, the other 1% is when I need to brake or when I need to do technical steering when I'm offroading.
    - Narrower tires. If you're riding pavement, get rid of those mountain bike tires. Get 1.25 - 1.50" tires with the appropriate tubes and run them at 60+ psi.
    I would love to see a photo of what you are talking about with the bar ends. Sounds quite interesting.

    I am already looking into a different set of tires for the bike that will provide less resistance. I have been considering these however as they have very good reflective qualities and I have used them before.....

    http://www.sweetskinz.com/

    I am thinking the Rattleback or the Scorch.

    As far as the "flashy" side goes. Well, I'll be adding quite a bit. I have already added LED lights on the front forks.
    I got them at an auto supply store. The come equipped with a "battery display" thing for in-store use. I keep the battery box and add a toggle
    switch. Still working on getting it to look good. But those white LED's on the front are bad-ass BRIGHT!!! I'll post some photos soon.

  5. #5
    hbrogan57
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch
    Rigid fork. Depending on how much you want to spend, you can get a perfectly good steel fork from Surly or Kona for under $100, or something fancier in steel or carbon fiber for more. Match your steer tube size, and look for one that's corrected for the amount of travel you have on your suspension fork.
    This fork does have the "lock out" so I can ride, basically, with a rigid fork. I rather like the idea of having some kind of suspension on the front. Especially with some of the roads around THIS area!!! Thanks for the suggestion though. I'll keep it in mind when I wear this one out.

  6. #6
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    O.k., here are some pics!

    Don't mock it until you've tried it! I consider it the single most innovative setup I've encountered in a long, long time.

    Concerning rigid forks, I agree with you, hbrogan: this thing has a rusted out junk fork on it that still gets about 2" travel, and the benefit of the comfort and control that 2" gives more than outweighs any perceived benefit of efficiency, IMO. I have another commute bike with a rigid fork, and I really wonder how people get around without at least a suspended fork? They must ride in cities where the roads are freshly paved, every summer!

    This bike is pretty ugly looking, but for the salted roads where I am it's still my trusty, ugly, don't-bother-stealing-this-one commuter. Runs great!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Any Suggestions???-picture-067-large-.jpg  

    Any Suggestions???-picture-068-large-.jpg  

    Last edited by Tim Blabbing; 03-03-2011 at 02:55 PM.

  7. #7
    hbrogan57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Blabbing
    O.k., here are some pics!

    Don't mock it until you've tried it! I consider it the single most innovative setup I've encountered in a long, long time.

    Concerning rigid forks, I agree with you, hbrogan: this thing has a rusted out junk fork on it that still gets about 2" travel, and the benefit of the comfort and control that 2" gives more than outweighs any perceived benefit of efficiency, IMO. I have another commute bike with a rigid fork, and I really wonder how people get around without at least a suspended fork? They must ride in cities where the roads are freshly paved, every summer!

    This bike is pretty ugly looking, but for the salted roads where I am it's still my trusty, ugly, don't-bother-stealing-this-one commuter. Runs great!
    Looks good and it also looks like it's been well used!!!! Doesn't matter WHAT it looks like as long as YOU are happy with it!!!!

    I just might try that bar-end idea and see what happens. Looks interesting to say the least.

    I also added these for evening rides. REALLY cheap and easy to install. Available at almost any auto parts store. Just have to make sure you get the ones with a "demonstration" button and convert that over to a toggle switch.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Any Suggestions???-dsc05450-1.jpg  

    Any Suggestions???-dsc05452-1-1.jpg  


  8. #8
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    Oh, by the way, got your pics of those leds. Wow, those are pretty trick. It seems you could mount those pretty much anywhere on a bike. Where's the battery pack, though?

  9. #9
    hbrogan57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Blabbing
    Oh, by the way, got your pics of those leds. Wow, those are pretty trick. It seems you could mount those pretty much anywhere on a bike. Where's the battery pack, though?
    Right now the pack is taped right with the toggle switch and zip tied to the handle bar. These are the flexible ones and work quite well with the subtle curves on a bike. And they are amazingly bright too. Going to try and get some evening shots to see the difference.

  10. #10
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Blabbing
    Concerning rigid forks, I agree with you, hbrogan: this thing has a rusted out junk fork on it that still gets about 2" travel, and the benefit of the comfort and control that 2" gives more than outweighs any perceived benefit of efficiency, IMO. I have another commute bike with a rigid fork, and I really wonder how people get around without at least a suspended fork? They must ride in cities where the roads are freshly paved, every summer!
    And yet, somehow I manage on a pretty traditional road bike. I do have to pay a little more attention to line selection, but it's fine on rough roads and even the occasional foray onto dirt and gravel. I appreciate having something that handles and climbs like a road bike the rest of the time.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  11. #11
    Class Clown
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    nice lights!

  12. #12
    hbrogan57
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    Quote Originally Posted by dundundata
    nice lights!
    THANKS!!

  13. #13
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    if that's a 29-er (looks like one to me)... you can run 700x35 tires (or larger of course) on the wheel.

  14. #14
    hbrogan57
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    Quote Originally Posted by tednugent
    if that's a 29-er (looks like one to me)... you can run 700x35 tires (or larger of course) on the wheel.
    Actually they are 26 X 2.00

  15. #15
    Yes, that's fonetic
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    I have suggestion. Stop posting like an idiot (example) and then deleting all your posts. You've showed your true colors now and we all know what a nutjob you really are.

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