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  1. #1
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    Any specialized ht guys with a cane creek thudbuster?

    Hey, anyone running a Cane Creek TB - LT on their Specialized HT, Please chime in with any info, specs, ideas, preload, thought processes at all, I've got one on order for my '97 Stumpy M2 HT, and would like any/all info from guys with positive experience that I can get...

    Thanks!


    H

  2. #2
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    One of my riding buddies has one on Rockhopper, he loves it. I rode it a around to give it a feel, rides like a sofa

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuPrBuGmAn View Post
    One of my riding buddies has one on Rockhopper, he loves it. I rode it a around to give it a feel, rides like a sofa
    Hey! can you ask how much preload he's running on it? I'd like to know what year/model ride it's on, the elastomers hes using an any info he culd share, I've got the post on order, coming any day, and like to get info from experienced riders with the thing....

    Either way, Thanks for the reply-

  4. #4
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    Its on a mid-2000s Rockhopper and the thudbuster came with the bike when he bought it on craigslist. I know he had to do a bit of adjustment to get it "right", but I'm not sure he knows the details on it since it was all part of his CL package. I'll ask next I see him though.

  5. #5
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    I have two, one on my '08 RH Disc & another on my girlfriends bike of the same model. I just slapped the TB on my bike lastnight & haven't played with the adjustments but I'm running two blue bushings. My girlfriend is running a blue & gray. I played with her adjustments when I first installed it but I no longer remember what those are.

  6. #6
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    SuperBug: Please let me know when you see him-
    Tom? May I call you Tom?? lol Two blue? may I also inquire your weight, sir?
    just trying to get some idea of how to set this funky post up when it arrives... Any/all info very welcome!!

  7. #7
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    I also read in the reviews on here where one of the LT owners seemed adamant that you HAD to shorten up Stem length to shorten cockpit to compensate the LT's movement or it meant Trouble for the Knees... Anyone else had that experience?????

  8. #8
    rsa
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    I'm about 185 lbs and run two blue elastomers on a steel hardtail. It definitely helps with the small chatter. You get a bit of bounce with bigger hits though. Overall, It makes my rides much more enjoyable.

    Cane creek has clear recommendations on elastomers based on body weight. I think I followed this, but have never experimented with other setups.

    The TB does push the saddle rearward, especially when accounting for some sag. I've moved the saddle as far as it can go forward on it's rails to compensate. It may impact seat to bar reach and impact your optimal stem length.

  9. #9
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    All this elastomer talk makes me think I'm in a time warp!
    MCH Co-Captain

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Call_me_Tom View Post
    I played with her adjustments when I first installed it but I no longer remember what those are.
    This sounds dirty. Nice!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by rsa View Post
    I'm about 185 lbs and run two blue elastomers on a steel hardtail. It definitely helps with the small chatter. You get a bit of bounce with bigger hits though. Overall, It makes my rides much more enjoyable.

    Cane creek has clear recommendations on elastomers based on body weight. I think I followed this, but have never experimented with other setups.

    The TB does push the saddle rearward, especially when accounting for some sag. I've moved the saddle as far as it can go forward on it's rails to compensate. It may impact seat to bar reach and impact your optimal stem length.
    Yea, I'd read Cane Creek includes setup info, i'd read some felt they werent always the most 'ride friendly' setups and after some trial and error a better ride was had by dropping down to next lowest weight setup and run more preload on the bolt... just wondered what anyone here thought, or if they remembered!
    I guess I'll screw with it a bunch an dial it in, like always... Glad theres a few fans of the TB here, having too much time while its shipping lets you get buyers remorse worries quickly....
    Its due here Monday, hope its worth the wait (weight?) Thanks!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by StumpyH View Post
    I also read in the reviews on here where one of the LT owners seemed adamant that you HAD to shorten up Stem length to shorten cockpit to compensate the LT's movement or it meant Trouble for the Knees... Anyone else had that experience?????
    Compensating for the movement by shortening the stem is still going to leave your knees in the same position. All other things being equal, the best compensation for the rearward movement is to slide the saddle forward where the rails get clamped... and only by a half-inch or so probably.

    Anyone who has knee trouble because of stem length has a very wacky set-up and/or shouldn't be listened to.

    As for set-up, I generally was happy (when I used my TB) with the blue-blue combo, which was the "up" one level harder for my suggested weight if I remember correctly. I think I tried blue-grey (or whatever was recommended) and it moved around too much for my liking... also seemed like just sitting on it used up most of the travel.

    For preload, I turned it in enough to take out any "slop" and then added like 2 full turns I think. At that point, it was basically set-and-forget. Take it apart every-so-often to clean it and stuff.

    But I did get tired of it... after a while I went back to the straight seat post. The TB is slightly more comfy, the straight post is slightly lighter and gives a firmer (obviously) feeling.
    You better just go ahead and drop that seatpost down to the reflector... the trail gets pretty rough down there.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Six Pack View Post

    Anyone who has knee trouble because of stem length has a very wacky set-up and/or shouldn't be listened to.


    LMAO!!!!!!!!!!!

    Thanks Uncle!! THATS what I was looking for, any feedback on real world use/specs.... I'm not looking forward to any weight penalty but my low back has kept me OUT of the trails for a years, (I got clinically Depressed over this s#!t at one point), so I'll take ANYTHING I can to get back out on a ride again, I cant STAND it anymore, seriously...
    if this works out ( I hope) I can keep my HT and I'm guessing a lite FS bike wont be far behind....

  14. #14
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    Oh yeah, and speaking of knee problems, you may want to run the seat slightly higher (unweighted) than normal also. Then when it sags your seat should be in a pretty good position for pedaling. Best bet is to have someone who knows about bike fitting check out your final set-up while you are sitting on it. Roughly, your leg should be pretty well extended at the bottom of the pedal stroke and your "front" kneecap should be roughly over the pedal when the cranks are at 3 and 9 o'clock position. As long as you don't run the elastometers too soft, should be pretty easy to achieve (assuming the bike fits you otherwise).

    Have fun, hope it gets you back into riding. As for low-back problems, a different stem or bar may help you out, but can't say for sure. That stumpy's riding position may have the reach a little too low/forward. A lot of the newer bikes have the geo a little tweaked to generally work better with a shorter stem... don't know about the geo on your '97. Again, someone who knows about bike fit could look at your specific situation and help you get more comfy.
    You better just go ahead and drop that seatpost down to the reflector... the trail gets pretty rough down there.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Six Pack View Post
    Oh yeah, and speaking of knee problems, you may want to run the seat slightly higher (unweighted) than normal also. Then when it sags your seat should be in a pretty good position for pedaling. Best bet is to have someone who knows about bike fitting check out your final set-up while you are sitting on it. Roughly, your leg should be pretty well extended at the bottom of the pedal stroke and your "front" kneecap should be roughly over the pedal when the cranks are at 3 and 9 o'clock position. As long as you don't run the elastometers too soft, should be pretty easy to achieve (assuming the bike fits you otherwise).

    Have fun, hope it gets you back into riding. As for low-back problems, a different stem or bar may help you out, but can't say for sure. That stumpy's riding position may have the reach a little too low/forward. A lot of the newer bikes have the geo a little tweaked to generally work better with a shorter stem... don't know about the geo on your '97. Again, someone who knows about bike fit could look at your specific situation and help you get more comfy.


    Thanks Unc'!

    Yea, when I first got into MTB I was OCD enough in the beginning to have my tape measure and mirrors out to make sure everything was as close to perfect for me as I could...
    I've got her set up perfect for me rt now actually, (fwiw I built her myself from a bare frame back in the day and I still have a number of shorter stems/ flat/riser bars from trying out different cockpit positons til I wound up back where I started, basically the original specs from the factory... ) The shorter stems just felt too squirrly and too quick on the front end, that's why I was asking if anyone felt the need to shorten things up and how it felt, luckily I've got enuf spare parts around to try quite a number of options..

    Anyway, I'm hopeful the new 'post gets my butt back out on the trails again, that'll help me justify a new FS next year w/ the ol lady.. But really, I'll try anything at this point if It'll get me back in the dirt where I belong...
    Thanks again!

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by StumpyH View Post
    SuperBug: Please let me know when you see him-
    Tom? May I call you Tom?? lol Two blue? may I also inquire your weight, sir?
    just trying to get some idea of how to set this funky post up when it arrives... Any/all info very welcome!!
    175lbs without gear.

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