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  1. #1
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    AFR shock tuning on Enduro SL

    Lately I've been doing a bit more experimentation with the shock settings on my 08 Enduro, I've had it for about a year now but the small bump absorbtion has never been the best. I know a lot of other people have also commented on this.

    I went for a ride yesterday running the shock at 35-40% sag, took it through some nice downhill rock gardens and roots. There was a pretty huge difference in plushness through the chatter, and I also liked having my weight positioned more toward the back of the bike, way easier to lift the front end and pop over stuff. The draw back of course is that the shock bottoms a lot easier, I didn't take the bike off any drops higher than a few feet but it's using full travel. Has anyone else run their shock with this much sag and if you've maybe added some oil to the air chamber to aid in bottom out resistance? Also wondering what Speci-Tech's opinion is on running this much sag?

    Climbing with this much sag was also still good with the compression set to firm. I think for purely XC trails I would run the normal 25-30% sag though.

  2. #2
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    I've stopped adjusting based on sag and merely set it up so that it just about bottoms out on the biggest hit on my regular ride. Much better small bump ability with probably about 40% sag.
    87 Muddy Fox Courier
    90 Marin Nail Trail
    97 Cannondale Super V700
    2000 Marin B17
    2007 Specialized Enduro SL Comp

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by doin
    Lately I've been doing a bit more experimentation with the shock settings on my 08 Enduro, I've had it for about a year now but the small bump absorbtion has never been the best. I know a lot of other people have also commented on this.

    I went for a ride yesterday running the shock at 35-40% sag, took it through some nice downhill rock gardens and roots. There was a pretty huge difference in plushness through the chatter, and I also liked having my weight positioned more toward the back of the bike, way easier to lift the front end and pop over stuff. The draw back of course is that the shock bottoms a lot easier, I didn't take the bike off any drops higher than a few feet but it's using full travel. Has anyone else run their shock with this much sag and if you've maybe added some oil to the air chamber to aid in bottom out resistance? Also wondering what Speci-Tech's opinion is on running this much sag?

    Climbing with this much sag was also still good with the compression set to firm. I think for purely XC trails I would run the normal 25-30% sag though.
    There is a progressive compression bleed in the shock shaft on the AFR , -----when the shock is topped out , the bleed is blocked by the seal head to add low speed compression to pedal better,
    as the shock becomes compressed , the bleed progressivly opens more and more and at around 40% rear wheel travel the bleed is all open .
    so when setting larg amounts of sag , it will feel plusher , but at the cost of overall handling.

    You will notice bottoming easier and most do not like the low BB height for pedal strikes and it will affect hard steep out of the saddle climbs as well as steering.

    You would be better off correcting the valving in the shock rather than running a really low ride height.

    The AFR is a great shock -------I find it is over valved for lighter and or less agressive riders .
    ( depending on what your riding area is made of )
    The spike valve needs to bleed more high speed off and it needs to do it quicker for lighter riders.

    I have changed the opening threshold and increased the flow through the spike valve plate on mine , ------It is far better on small bump and it still pedals the same and can run what ever ride height I want .

    I want to build a different piston and run the spike valve like a Mid valve in showa forks , --
    that way it will have a larger window of adjustment to suit more riders ,---
    I also want to make an external adjustment for this high speed blow off -----------that would be nice !

  4. #4
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    Another thing to check, Is the bearings in the pivot points. When these are nice and free small bump absortion is much improved.
    On my 2008 SL expert enduro, I found that the spacers that sit between the bearings were too narrow, And when the mounting bolt was done up tight, It put enough side load on the bearing to lock them up.On my bike, only 1 out of 4 were the right size.Seems to be machining variation during manufacture ( Of the bearing pockets).
    Once I made up new spacers, and put it all back together, the rear end really worked a treat so smooth.
    Rob.

  5. #5
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    30-40% sag? I'm 210lb and would probably bottom out the shock on very little hits.

    How tall are you guys and what settings did you run? Probably fast on the rebound if your running so little air?

  6. #6
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    I'm just under 190lbs and 6'3". I've went back to running about 30% sag (about 150-160psi), I still bottom out the shock every now and then but nothing too bad. I run either 5 or 6 clicks from full-fast on the rebound, and always run the compression in the soft setting.

    Now I've just got to replace my pivot bearings, 3 years on the original ones and they're starting to creak pretty loudly!

  7. #7
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    Ah, maybe thats where I am going wrong. I've got 195psi. Maybe I need to back it off alittle.

    Which one is the compression? the flick switch (F to B) - whats that?!

  8. #8
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    The factory bleeds the negative air spring on the shock, possibly to make it easier to assemble. Doing this kills the small bump compliance. If you do an air sleeve service and trap air in the negative spring, the small bump compliance improves dramatically. In addition, you will find the shock resists bottoming better as well, as you will need higher pressures to get the same sag.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Horacek View Post
    Which one is the compression? the flick switch (F to B) - whats that?!

    The compression is the blue lever, it has 4 settings (firm through to soft with two in between). If the 'S' is facing up, you've got it in the soft setting.

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