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  1. #1
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    2011 Stumpy FSR EVO

    Anyone actuall ridden the new FSR EVO
    About to preorder one but concerned the 67 deg. head angle may be to slack for climbing. I do a fair share of climbing and downhills on my rides but I live on the east coast where we don't have a ton of elevation. I want a bike that is a do all bike and can be ridden anywhere anytime. I've been to Cottonwood Valley near Vegas and rode a stumpy fsr comp and it felt great for everything but one really steep, rocky descent and it was a 68.5 head angle.
    Any thoughts????

    Thought about going w/ the Elite but then your not getting the tapered head tube, 15qr and the SRAM drivetrain which are all important to me. So honestly its just the damn HTA thats holding me back.

  2. #2
    superluker
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    I'm bumping this one.

    Wondering if anyone has ridden one too, not just around a parking lot. I'm curious if the bike feels efficient on climbs without the brain shock. Also does the HTA and xtra travel lessen the XC use of the bike? I really dig the specs of the bike but living in the midwest it might be too All Mountainish. Any feed back would be appreciated.

  3. #3
    JCL
    JCL is offline
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    Despite conventional thought, head tube angle isn't that indicative to climbing performance. A steeper seat tube angle (74.5 deg on the SJ EVO) is far more important measurement. IMO, unless you're riding technical trails beyond the scope of the average trail bike? Your money would be better spent on a carbon Stumpjumper than the SJ EVO.

  4. #4
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    I got one about a week ago, and it's awesome. Climbing obviously isn't as good as a regular sj model, but it's not bad. I think the biggest improvement could be made with a travel adjust fork. Then you'd get a 68-69deg HA with a low front end. I have found that the harder you ride this bike downhill, the better it feels. Climbing out of saddle works fairly well, but I'm a bit disapointed with the effectiveness of the propedal. I really can't even tell the difference when it's on or off. Sprinting when going downhill with this bike is amazing. It is VERY responsive to all rider inputs and puts you in an a body position that actually reminds me of my demo. I am riding mine stock, accept I upgraded the rear rotor to a seven inch rotor, and switched to a 50mm gravity light stem. I also installed pointone podium pedals.
    I bought this bike because I wanted a trail bike that climbed better than my enduro did, and that could rip the downhill.
    I got excatly what I was looking for

    That being said, I agree with JCL. If climbing/trail riding is your priority, I would go with a carbon SJ. But if you go up primarily to have a lot of fun going down, then the Evo is awesome.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by thedudeman
    Climbing out of saddle works fairly well, but I'm a bit disapointed with the effectiveness of the propedal. I really can't even tell the difference when it's on or off.
    I think the pro pedal setting is very effective, almost like riding a hardtail. Absolutely no bobbing. But there's too much platform in the open setting, imo. When it's open, it's still almost like Fox Triad on 2010 Stumpy with pro pedal on. I think I'm going to try and reduce the boost valve pressure and if that doesn't make it plush, I might send the shock to TF Tuned for tuning... I think Specialized optimized the shock too much for all day riding, and not enough for riding downhill trails.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mehukatti
    I think the pro pedal setting is very effective, almost like riding a hardtail. Absolutely no bobbing. But there's too much platform in the open setting, imo. When it's open, it's still almost like Fox Triad on 2010 Stumpy with pro pedal on. I think I'm going to try and reduce the boost valve pressure and if that doesn't make it plush, I might send the shock to TF Tuned for tuning... I think Specialized optimized the shock too much for all day riding, and not enough for riding downhill trails.
    I'm wondering if mine is broke, it's super active, virtually no difference w/ propedal on or off.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCL
    Despite conventional thought, head tube angle isn't that indicative to climbing performance. A steeper seat tube angle (74.5 deg on the SJ EVO) is far more important measurement. IMO, unless you're riding technical trails beyond the scope of the average trail bike? Your money would be better spent on a carbon Stumpjumper than the SJ EVO.
    This man speaks the truth.

  8. #8
    Semi-Hairless Sasquatch
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    Would I be totally insane to pursue the Stumpy EVO if I planned on shimming it down to 130mm front and rear? I think I would actually prefer a slightly steeper headtube angle for the tight twisty stuff but I'm not sure if shimming down would effect other shock and fork dynamics besides limiting the travel.

    The SJ Elite test bike I had last weekend was great on descents even if I only wound up using ~120mm of the travel, but felt like more travel than I wanted on technical climbs and had buttloads of bob going on (I'm mostly/equally attributing this to the Brain). The Pro Pedal on the Triad equipped Camber I had this weekend felt way better to me.

    I really liked the rest of the Stumpy I rode and the EVO package in particular on paper.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by thedudeman
    I'm wondering if mine is broke, it's super active, virtually no difference w/ propedal on or off.
    Hmm maybe this is due to subjective preferences? Do you have these stickers on the shock:

    Velocity tune: L
    Rebound tune: M
    Boost valve tune: 250

    Or maybe the boost valve on your shock has lower pressure than the supposed 250psi for some reason?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sid Nitzerglobin
    Would I be totally insane to pursue the Stumpy EVO
    if I planned on shimming it down to 130mm front and rear? I think I would
    actually prefer a slightly steeper headtube angle for the tight twisty stuff
    but I'm not sure if shimming down would effect other shock and fork dynamics
    besides limiting the travel.

    The SJ Elite test bike I had last weekend was great on descents even if I
    only wound up using ~120mm of the travel, but felt like more travel than I
    wanted on technical climbs and had buttloads of bob going on (I'm
    mostly/equally attributing this to the Brain). The Pro Pedal on the Triad
    equipped Camber I had this weekend felt way better to me.

    I really liked the rest of the Stumpy I rode and the EVO package in
    particular on paper.
    How exactly would you lower the suspension on Evo? Even if you could lower the 32 Float fork, how are you gonna do the same for rear? This would not be wise, as it would lower the bottom bracket so much that you would hit pedals to ground on every pedal stroke, as you would have to also subtract sag from the 120mm. Sounds to me that a regular SJ would be better for you, probably the Expert or Pro model that come with Fox 32 Talas that allow the fork to be lowered on climbs.

  10. #10
    Semi-Hairless Sasquatch
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    Quote Originally Posted by mehukatti
    How exactly would you lower the suspension on Evo? Even if you could lower the 32 Float fork, how are you gonna do the same for rear? This would not be wise, as it would lower the bottom bracket so much that you would hit pedals to ground on every pedal stroke, as you would have to also subtract sag from the 120mm. Sounds to me that a regular SJ would be better for you, probably the Expert or Pro model that come with Fox 32 Talas that allow the fork to be lowered on climbs.
    There are threads on here that describe the process by adding spacers. Sounds like Fox themselves do this to achieve different travels using the same shock/fork bodies. Doesn't sound like the overall length of the rear suspension is actually shortened at all just reduces the amount of travel. I'm totally fine w/ the lowering of the bottom bracket to the extent that the 20mm shorter fork would produce. Looks like I would still be better off on this front than my current ride or other 120mm bikes I've been looking at. My main concern would be if the compression and rebound curves would be majorly impacted in a negative way as a result of lowering the overall volume of the air spring.

    The problem w/ the Expert or Pro is that they come w/ the Brain which I'm pretty sure I'm not into based on my test rides of the SJ Elite. Price is also a concern as even the EVO is a bit of a stretch. I would look at the Comp, but I'd really like to get the S2200 crank, the 2x10 w/ 36/24, the tapered steerer and 15mm through axle, and the Rovals. It also seems like the RP-23 is much more highly regarded than the Triad, although the Triad seemed to work fine for me on the Camber.
    Last edited by Sid Nitzerglobin; 11-15-2010 at 09:02 AM.

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