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  1. #1
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    2011 RH expert 29er worthy race bike?

    I know this all depends on the rider (RH + ned overend), but if someone wanted to do some racing and hopefully progress without blowing too much money upfront, would this setup be ok? For 1149 I can get one and the 2011 seems pretty good specs to me. Please let me know your thoughts on this bike.

  2. #2
    Trying not to kill myself
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    I know a couple of guys who race Rockhoppers and do just fine with them. They've got more of a relaxed trail geometry compared to the Stumpy or other dedicated XC bikes, so it really depends how serious you think you'll be about racing. I was recently in the market for a HT and I came very close to buying a RH Expert before finding a deal on a used Stumpy. It's a big step up from the Comp from a component standpoint, but doesn't cost that much more money. For a good all around trail bike that can do some racing on the side, I think it's a pretty good fit.

  3. #3
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    You might be able to find a 2010 Stumpy Comp for the same price, and probably better components and resale value over the RH.

    Remember that Ned was on a SS RH. If you were just going SS I would say RH, but if you think you are really gonna enjoy racing geared, then Stumpy.

    I have a Stumpy 29er SS and love it. But I've been beaten by a guy who rides a RH 29er SS in 4 races last year.

    Like you said, the engine.....
    I'd rather be hated for what I am, than loved for what I'm not......Dolemite.

  4. #4
    cougarbait
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    Quote Originally Posted by Birdss
    If you were just going SS I would say RH, but if you think you are really gonna enjoy racing geared, then Stumpy.
    .
    what about the stumpy frame makes it more conducive to gears?
    09AS-Rsl/09Six

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lambdamaster
    what about the stumpy frame makes it more conducive to gears?
    Well....Like someone said:

    The Rockhopper is a "recreational" mountain bike. The frame is the same material as the Stumpy, but only the down tube is butted, or as Specailized puts it "manipulated". Butting is a process of making tubes thinner in areas of low stress and thicker in high stress areas. This saves weight but still produces just as strong a frame. The only butted tube on the Hopper is the downtube. The rest of the tubes are straight gauge. With straight gauge tubing the thickness of the tube is uniform for it's entire length. Just as strong just a bit heavier when all is said and done.

    The Stumpjumper is designed to be a full on XC Race bike, and is speced as such. With the Stumpjumper the down tube, top tube, chain stays, seat stays and seat tube are all butted. This gives you the lightest possible frame, while maintaining strength. Plus you have much nicer components when you compare the two.

    Geometry is also different. The Stumpy has a steeper head angle, shorter chainstays, shorter wheel base, shorter top tube, taller bottom bracket height and standover height etc. for a given size. Pretty much a tight handling XC Race geomentry. So the two bikes do ride and feel different!

    Generally speaking it's usually better and cheaper to go with the best bike you can afford and delay upgrades as long as possible. But it also depends on what you WANT as well. The Hopper and the Stumpy are two VERY different bikes for different purposes. If you like the Racer geometry then save your money and get a Stumpy. If not then go with the more trail oriented geo of the Hopper. If you go with the top of the line Rockhopper you'll be getting a good fork, RS Recon, disc brakes and a VERY serviceable components mix. It won't be as light as a Stumpjumper, but every bit as durable if not more so, as race oriented components tend to be lighter but a bit less durable. With the solid frame/fork combo and reasonable wheelset of the Rockhopper Pro Disc, you'd have a good base to work with for drive train upgrades if you wanted.

    So, your choice, it's all in what you want. Are you looking for a XC/race bike or more of a recreational fun bike? Both bikes are fun don't get me wrong. It's all in how you want the bike to handle and perform. The Hopper will be more of a do it all bike, the Stumpy more oriented to racing.


    That's what makes it more conducive to gears for me...also it's lighter.
    I'd rather be hated for what I am, than loved for what I'm not......Dolemite.

  6. #6
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    That must be some old info, because the Rockhopper has been made with a fully butted frame for years now (even the Hardrock has one). The Stumpy is definitely a much lighter and uses a different alloy than the RH, but there's no longer a big difference in the frame construction from the research I've done. The geometry does set them apart, but even that isn't such a big deal unless you're a fairly advanced racer IMO. I've seen really fast guys riding all sorts of 'trail' bikes at races - back to the engine thing again . I say if you can swing the cost of a Stumpy, by all means go for it. But if not, the RH will be fine to start with and make upgrades to, and you can always move everything to a lighter race frame later.


    Quote Originally Posted by Birdss
    Well....Like someone said:

    The Rockhopper is a "recreational" mountain bike. The frame is the same material as the Stumpy, but only the down tube is butted, or as Specailized puts it "manipulated". Butting is a process of making tubes thinner in areas of low stress and thicker in high stress areas. This saves weight but still produces just as strong a frame. The only butted tube on the Hopper is the downtube. The rest of the tubes are straight gauge. With straight gauge tubing the thickness of the tube is uniform for it's entire length. Just as strong just a bit heavier when all is said and done.

    The Stumpjumper is designed to be a full on XC Race bike, and is speced as such. With the Stumpjumper the down tube, top tube, chain stays, seat stays and seat tube are all butted. This gives you the lightest possible frame, while maintaining strength. Plus you have much nicer components when you compare the two.

    Geometry is also different. The Stumpy has a steeper head angle, shorter chainstays, shorter wheel base, shorter top tube, taller bottom bracket height and standover height etc. for a given size. Pretty much a tight handling XC Race geomentry. So the two bikes do ride and feel different!

    Generally speaking it's usually better and cheaper to go with the best bike you can afford and delay upgrades as long as possible. But it also depends on what you WANT as well. The Hopper and the Stumpy are two VERY different bikes for different purposes. If you like the Racer geometry then save your money and get a Stumpy. If not then go with the more trail oriented geo of the Hopper. If you go with the top of the line Rockhopper you'll be getting a good fork, RS Recon, disc brakes and a VERY serviceable components mix. It won't be as light as a Stumpjumper, but every bit as durable if not more so, as race oriented components tend to be lighter but a bit less durable. With the solid frame/fork combo and reasonable wheelset of the Rockhopper Pro Disc, you'd have a good base to work with for drive train upgrades if you wanted.

    So, your choice, it's all in what you want. Are you looking for a XC/race bike or more of a recreational fun bike? Both bikes are fun don't get me wrong. It's all in how you want the bike to handle and perform. The Hopper will be more of a do it all bike, the Stumpy more oriented to racing.


    That's what makes it more conducive to gears for me...also it's lighter.

  7. #7
    cougarbait
    Reputation: Lambdamaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Birdss
    Well....Like someone said:

    The Rockhopper is a "recreational" mountain bike. The frame is the same material as the Stumpy, but only the down tube is butted, or as Specailized puts it "manipulated". Butting is a process of making tubes thinner in areas of low stress and thicker in high stress areas. This saves weight but still produces just as strong a frame. The only butted tube on the Hopper is the downtube. The rest of the tubes are straight gauge. With straight gauge tubing the thickness of the tube is uniform for it's entire length. Just as strong just a bit heavier when all is said and done.

    The Stumpjumper is designed to be a full on XC Race bike, and is speced as such. With the Stumpjumper the down tube, top tube, chain stays, seat stays and seat tube are all butted. This gives you the lightest possible frame, while maintaining strength. Plus you have much nicer components when you compare the two.

    Geometry is also different. The Stumpy has a steeper head angle, shorter chainstays, shorter wheel base, shorter top tube, taller bottom bracket height and standover height etc. for a given size. Pretty much a tight handling XC Race geomentry. So the two bikes do ride and feel different!

    Generally speaking it's usually better and cheaper to go with the best bike you can afford and delay upgrades as long as possible. But it also depends on what you WANT as well. The Hopper and the Stumpy are two VERY different bikes for different purposes. If you like the Racer geometry then save your money and get a Stumpy. If not then go with the more trail oriented geo of the Hopper. If you go with the top of the line Rockhopper you'll be getting a good fork, RS Recon, disc brakes and a VERY serviceable components mix. It won't be as light as a Stumpjumper, but every bit as durable if not more so, as race oriented components tend to be lighter but a bit less durable. With the solid frame/fork combo and reasonable wheelset of the Rockhopper Pro Disc, you'd have a good base to work with for drive train upgrades if you wanted.

    So, your choice, it's all in what you want. Are you looking for a XC/race bike or more of a recreational fun bike? Both bikes are fun don't get me wrong. It's all in how you want the bike to handle and perform. The Hopper will be more of a do it all bike, the Stumpy more oriented to racing.


    That's what makes it more conducive to gears for me...also it's lighter.
    my previous gen RH frame is very much butted all around. I can't imagine the new ones aren't, since the frame construction is basically a previous gen stumpy.
    09AS-Rsl/09Six

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