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  1. #1
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    '13 Stumpjumper FSR 29er questions. UPDATE-bottom of page 1..

    Hey all, been riding a HT 29er for about a year now and I am quickly realizing that with the different types of riding I've ventured into a FS bike is definitely more suitable. I've got a few options, one being the Stumpy FSR 29er Comp. The components look decent, 130mm travel and the top tube is about 1.5" lower than my current ride (a welcome change).

    1.) I do a lot of climbing, both in an out of saddle. CTD aside, how well does this bike climb?

    2.) Also, my google-fu isn't coming up with any frame protection for the newer SJ frames, is there anything out there?

    Other bikes I am considering include the Niner RIP9 and Santa Cruz Bronson, all of which I should be able to test ride this weekend.
    Last edited by mamba1220; 05-02-2013 at 08:39 PM.

  2. #2
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    The stumpy is a 30 pound SUV, not a sub 25 pound eccono hardtail.
    It will not climb like the ladder and if you expect it too you will be dissapointed - with most fullies for that matter...

    That being said lets talk about FSR - no brain. If you stand and mash alot to climb you might want to look at the brain equiped builds or another manufacturer/design. If you sit and spin the majority of the time, the trail setting on the new Fox shox will be just fine.

    I find with a smooth seated pedal stroke @ 230 pounds, i dont feel much bob. I also like how compliant the FSR system can be to smaller chatter - I think you lose this on some of the new more popular designes meant to reduce bob. I dont like those systems for climbing becasue I dont get the traction and get more fatigued and sore after a long day.

    I dont race or try to impress anyone with my riding so pedal effeciancy may be better on other bikes but i like the actual suspension reaction to the bazzilion small rocks and roots on my trails.

    My take on spec fsr anyway, other mileage may very.
    Ride before you buy!

    If anyone finds new frame protection - i'm interested too.

  3. #3
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    Glad to hear you are in the same weight range and the bike suits you well. I should say I sit for more of the longer, gradual climbs. I stand for the quick sub-50' jaunts that I don't won't to lose momentum for.

  4. #4
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    The type of trail matters too. I'm in Ohio so I dont see long extended climbs, just the 10-100' like you said. (covered with roots) I stand and mash for momentum's sake as you said all the time and ther is some slight bob. I'm out there to lose weight and have fun - not to win races. The bob is ok for me because the payoff from the small bump compliance makes it worth it for me. Also why i'm on a 29er...

    Good luck whatever you decide!

  5. #5
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    Quick update. I went riding today and stopped at a very good LBS just outside the state land I frequent for singletrack. The guys there are always helpful and recommended I try out an Epic Comp 29er for the type of riding I do vs. the SJ. Needless to say I loved it! The bike seemed very responsive to all inputs, which for me is very important. They have one on hold for me and I am going to give them my final decision on Monday.

    FYI- I also rode the Niner Jet9 and was not impressed. I couldn't warm up to it for the life of me even after setting up the suspension for my weight.

  6. #6
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    I purchased a 13 SJ FSR elite 29er and besides getting my first bike as a lemon I love the bike and what it can do. I rode the epic also and liked it, but hated how soft the front fork was. If the epic came with a fox fork and through axle I would have bought one.

  7. #7
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    '13 Stumpjumper FSR 29er questions.

    I started with a Stumpjumper and now have an Epic. Based on the type of riding you described, I was going to recommend the Epic. It's probably the perfect setup based on the priorities you described.
    JA

  8. #8
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    Made my decision today and had the guys @ my LBS order in a SJ FSR Comp 29 in charcoal/black. Riding both Epic and SJ back to back, I was more confident on the SJ. The Epic was great, but when a bike inspires more confidence it usually means more enjoyment and more pushing the envelope. Thanks for the help.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mamba1220 View Post
    Made my decision today and had the guys @ my LBS order in a SJ FSR Comp 29 in charcoal/black. Riding both Epic and SJ back to back, I was more confident on the SJ. The Epic was great, but when a bike inspires more confidence it usually means more enjoyment and more pushing the envelope. Thanks for the help.
    I have the same bike and I love it. Congrats

  10. #10
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    Congratulations. Just finished some ass kicking trail ride with my FSR Elite 29,can't fault the bike,I love it !!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mamba1220 View Post
    Made my decision today and had the guys @ my LBS order in a SJ FSR Comp 29 in charcoal/black. Riding both Epic and SJ back to back, I was more confident on the SJ. The Epic was great, but when a bike inspires more confidence it usually means more enjoyment and more pushing the envelope. Thanks for the help.
    I assume the Epic had a Brain. Did the SJ you demo'd have one?
    What's your take on pedal bob between the two while mashing, weight, and the plushness in general?

    I agree the geo and setup of the SJ is confidence inspiring compared to the Epic.
    (If you're not trying to get KOM)

    Anyway, we have the same bike - grats!

  12. #12
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    I ride a 2012 stumpy fsr 26er. I have no issues climbing steep terrain here in Wyoming and northern Colorado. My old ride was a 08 stumpy with only 120mm of travel. My new stumpy climbs pretty much the same with a 140mm.

  13. #13
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    '13 Stumpjumper FSR 29er questions.

    Congrats, great choice. I have the same bike. It is superbly capable on the trails.

  14. #14
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    Hey mamba make sure to post a review to this post after you hit the trails on your new stumpy!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brand0n1 View Post
    I assume the Epic had a Brain. Did the SJ you demo'd have one?
    What's your take on pedal bob between the two while mashing, weight, and the plushness in general?

    I agree the geo and setup of the SJ is confidence inspiring compared to the Epic.
    (If you're not trying to get KOM)

    Anyway, we have the same bike - grats!
    Quote Originally Posted by stumpynerd View Post
    Hey mamba make sure to post a review to this post after you hit the trails on your new stumpy!
    The Epic had a Brain and the SJ I rode did not. The SJ was a carbon model, susp and geo were the same as the one I ordered. Main difference is weight (obviously), drivetrain and brakes. Epic was much stiffer, rider forward and responded faster to inputs (not twitchy, but you need to give it the right amount of input or you'll wind up in a ditch). Epic definitely had better brakes after taking a set/burn in. One of my goals noted in the OP was achieving a slightly lower standover to keep my boys safe, and although it was not a major deciding factor, the Epic was adding roughly 1/2" over my current ride while the SJ is about 11/4" lower than my current setup.

    Between the two, the Epic had less pedal bob, but mainly due to the brain being one click from it's firmest setting. The '13 SJ, however, has the CTD Fox shocks front and back so I can switch between Climb, Trail and Descend from seated position. I only rode the SJ in Trail and Descend and pedal bob was a minimum, I probably won't use Climb unless on a very long climb. I could've ordered the SJ Elite, which would've gotten me the Brain shock, but you cannot switch settings on the Brain without getting off of the bike since it is located interior of the rear triangle, and within an inch of the spokes. I didn't feel the tradeoff was worth it as I'd rather be able to switch on the fly when necessary since I am constantly exploring new trails with no idea what to expect.

    I will post up a review sometime Sat or Sun. My shop is putting my bars/stem/pedals on and is setting it up tubeless Sat morning and I'll escape off to the trails from there for a few hours.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by mamba1220 View Post
    Made my decision today and had the guys @ my LBS order in a SJ FSR Comp 29 in charcoal/black. Riding both Epic and SJ back to back, I was more confident on the SJ. The Epic was great, but when a bike inspires more confidence it usually means more enjoyment and more pushing the envelope. Thanks for the help.
    One of the reasons I went with a Stumpy. I have few mountain biking skills, and the big wheels and slack angles of the Stumpy made for a bike that you could do a lot of things with and not get you into trouble doing it.

  17. #17
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    Glad you went with the Stumpy. I have a 12', basically same bike. I agree about the FSR and the smoothness of your pedal stroke. If you pedal technique is bad (like mine) you will notice a little bob. Out of seat pedaling you will see more bob. If your sitting with a smooth stroke, the bob in minimized. I only realized this recently when i started actually working on a better pedal stroke. With or without bob, i think it still climbs fine. (i also have an Enduro which is alot more painful to climb in) You can always lock out the rear if you need to anyway.

    I rode and Epic and Stumpy before making my decision. Went with stumpy because more travel, i don't plan on racing, i have more fun descending than climbing. The stumpy if hands down the better descender.

    Your first upgrade should be a Dropper post. it makes a world of difference! Everything else on that bike is good or good enough! cept maybe the rear hub.

  18. #18
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    As for upgrades, brakes and wheels are the best upgrade to any bike. Hope or XT I would recommend for brakes. For wheels there are tons of great choices out there. I have never tried a dropper post, so I cant comment on that one.

  19. #19
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    The climb mode on the new CTD shock is amazing. My SJ is rock solid on the climbs. Much better than the shock on the previous years. I had a 2009 and a 2011 SJ and the 2013 climbs the best by far.
    2013 Stumpy Evo
    2014 Fatboy

  20. #20
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    UPDATE: Well the shop called me today to say that my bike was in and had been built up, just waiting on me to bring my pedals and riser bars. It just so happened that my sales route was ending in about that area and my helmet/camelback/parts were in my car form the day before. I popped in, we tossed on the pedals, forewent the bars for the time being since they already had the factory bars on it, and off I went. Fortunately for me, and everyone that does business with them, there is a large parcel of state land with probably around 30 miles of singletrack literally across the street. Win.

    I managed to squeeze in about an hour of ride time before deeming it time to head home. I started on some of the old carriage roads to get used to the bike and then hit some singletrack. Some small downed trees, a few rock gardens and some steep drops later; I am in love. The bike is very confidence inspiring and responds well to inputs. You just sort of look where you want to go and you're there. Similarly to my test ride, I only used the Trail mode today on the shocks and ran into no problems even when mashing the pedals pretty good on some small (less than 50') climbs. Also, using the o-rings as indicators I am using probably about 70-75% of the travel in Trail mode on these sections of singletrack including a few small jumps and hops. I am happy with that as it did a great job smoothing out the bumps, yet isn't giving so much that it slows me down. I am sure that in Descent mode I will use closer to 100% of travel.

    The only thing I don't like, and may eventually change, are the brakes. Although they stop well, there is no way to get the lever to engage the brake "near the top" of the pull so to speak like my Shimano's, even after a bit of fudging with them. If anyone has suggestions on this please let me know, but from what I have researched that is just the way Avid's are.

    Overall, I am very happy with the ride and fit of the bike to my specific needs. Hell, even the seat is decently comfy and may stay put for another ride instead of swapping out right away, we shall see after the 3-5hr session planned for Saturday. Lots of bike for the price, and if you are not looking for a dedicated "XC Racer" this is at least worth a ride and consideration.

  21. #21
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    Excellent review. Stumpys are a great all around bike. I have seen them change over the years and they just keep on getting better.

    Check out my review. Too much snow around here in Wyoming now, hopefully the trails are open soon.

    2012 Stumpy 26er vs 2008 Stumpy 26er (Caution Long Read!)

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by stumpynerd View Post
    Excellent review. Stumpys are a great all around bike. I have seen them change over the years and they just keep on getting better.

    Check out my review. Too much snow around here in Wyoming now, hopefully the trails are open soon.

    2012 Stumpy 26er vs 2008 Stumpy 26er (Caution Long Read!)
    Nice review man. I am new to Specialized, and mountain bikes in general since up until last year I had been out of the game for about a decade, so it is nice to hear of some of the evolution of the platform.

    Its funny, I am getting used to the 2x10 gearing as well coming from 3x9. Although I I actually feel like I am hunting for gears less though, so it is a welcome change. Every now and then though I run up on a nasty climb in the wrong gear and bail. I expect this will go away within a few rides.

  23. #23
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    Wait till Memorial day weekend sales and replace the avids with some XT's.

    I scored mine from pricepoint with a deal and a match that put me arouns 85$ each front and rear. You can't do any better brake to cost wise.

    FYI, I tried new pads (organic) new rotor, sanded, alcoholed, bled, and prayed.
    I was able to get the noise out of them but the warble/shudder never stopped....

    As many others have found.

    As for the saddle, I pointed the nose down a tic more that I have in the past with WTB saddles and have to say - I think its a keeper.

  24. #24
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    Just from experience, I tried my friends XTs and they have a ton of stopping power, however they didnt have the modulation of my hopes. The XTs seemed pretty grabby compared to my Hopes, but some people like that however.

  25. #25
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    Rode, one of my local trails here in Wyoming. My new M4 Hope brakes are broke in and I was able to fine tune my bite and reach adjustment. One thing I noticed during my ride from my stumpy review was the tapered head tube makes a world of difference on riding granite slabs, mixed with rocks & drops. I hit an area on the trail slower than I thought, over a slight rocky drop. I thought I was going to endo, but the front end soaked things up, and I barely had to muscle the bike to maintain my line. On my old stumpy I probaly would of endo. Here is a snapshot of one of my local trails.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails '13 Stumpjumper FSR 29er questions.-2.jpg  


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