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Thread: '06 stumpy fsr

  1. #1
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    '06 stumpy fsr

    I'm about to pull the trigger on a 2006 Stumpjumper FSR, but I'm confused about something - the dealer said that all 2006 stumpy's have 5" travel. The type of riding that I do only requires 4". Am I really going to notice the difference in handling? Should I look at the Epic instead? I'm looking for a good all-around trail bike for under $2k - something that can handle techie sections but is also very good at climbing. I'm not really into downhill or drops or anything, more into biking to get outside and get great exercise. I want to make sure I get the right bike for my needs. Also, I'm still kind of a beginner/intermediate rider, and I want something that will last. Any thoughts?

    Thanks

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    Take an Epic and a SJ out for a test ride around your local trails that really is the only way you will know for sure the bike is right for you.

    The SJ will climb just fine and the susspension will be more comfortable for all around riding. The Eric is design around racing and comfort comes second to speed and stiffness. Both are great bikes for what they are designed to do.

  3. #3
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    Test them if you can... The Epic will be harsher because it is racier, so the rear suspension is not as active as the Stumpjumper.

    I don't think that the extra inch in travel will hamper you. Actually it will raise the BB, making the bike easier to roll over some obstacles, like a fallen tree branch or rock.

    What's the kind of terrain you do? If it is very technical, the Stumpjumper may have some good points, but if it is flat, the Epic really sounds smooth.

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    My terrain of choice is smooth singletrack, but around here (mid-Atlantic) it's often interrupted by rocks and tree fall, quick and steep ups and downs. The geometry of my hardtail just doesn't feel right, too big to be able to shift balance around and control the bike when it gets technical. This led me to the stumpjumper and the trek fuel. I was leaning towards the stumpy until I learned about the 5" travel, which gives me the impression that it's designed for bigger hits and downhill. But if the extra 1" of travel really won't make a difference with respect to weight and cornering feel then I think I'm going to go for the stumpjumper.

    I'm not too concerned with weight in the sense that a xc racer is, and I actually would prefer comfort over a rigid rig.

    Thanks for the input so far!

  5. #5
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    I have a Stumpjumper FSR 100, and I think it is a very light bike for the size (mine is an XL), and Specialized claims that it looses a few grams for the 120 design. So I really think you'll get a really nice bike. Mine corners very well and it shines on singletrack.

    I don't think that the extra 1" will make the bike less responsive and cornering feel.

    I don't really know about Trek, I think they're nice bikes.... but the Stumpjumper is a great bike IMHO....

    Have fun

    pd... just to play Devil's Advocate, have you posted this question on the Trek forum?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by BmoreKen
    I'm about to pull the trigger on a 2006 Stumpjumper FSR, but I'm confused about something - the dealer said that all 2006 stumpy's have 5" travel. The type of riding that I do only requires 4". Am I really going to notice the difference in handling? Should I look at the Epic instead? I'm looking for a good all-around trail bike for under $2k - something that can handle techie sections but is also very good at climbing. I'm not really into downhill or drops or anything, more into biking to get outside and get great exercise. I want to make sure I get the right bike for my needs. Also, I'm still kind of a beginner/intermediate rider, and I want something that will last. Any thoughts?

    Thanks

    I guarantee that if you get a 4 inch travel bike,( an Epic, FSR XC, or an 05 stumpy 100), you will be begging for that extra inch of travel you turned down in a year.

    With shock technology, the Triad, or having the whatever shock you have Pushed, the 5 inch stumpy will climb well, but will be a blast descending with 25% more travel than the 100.

    Good Luck!
    Astigmatic Visionary

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by BmoreKen
    I'm about to pull the trigger on a 2006 Stumpjumper FSR, but I'm confused about something - the dealer said that all 2006 stumpy's have 5" travel. The type of riding that I do only requires 4". Am I really going to notice the difference in handling? Should I look at the Epic instead? I'm looking for a good all-around trail bike for under $2k - something that can handle techie sections but is also very good at climbing. I'm not really into downhill or drops or anything, more into biking to get outside and get great exercise. I want to make sure I get the right bike for my needs. Also, I'm still kind of a beginner/intermediate rider, and I want something that will last. Any thoughts?

    Thanks
    Yes, I agree you should test ride the bike but I think in the long run you will want the Stumpy. I have the 5" Stumpy Pro and I love riding that bike more than any of the others I have ever owned.

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    I will cast my vote for the Stumpy 120 as well, and only partly because I own one.

    5" travel used to only be available on heavy DH bikes, but not anymore. I think the stock 2005 120 Expert came in at about 29 pounds. My size large 120 Pro frame with lightish parts (midweight tires and tubes) weighs about 27. Descending is its forte, but it climbs great with the Talas fork lowered a bit. Doesn't feel like a tank at all. Pretty nimble in technical singletrack.

    Unless you race I think you would love this bike. I do. And the 2006's are better because they have a rear shock lockout...

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    Quote Originally Posted by rzozaya1969
    I have a Stumpjumper FSR 100, and I think it is a very light bike for the size (mine is an XL),
    I'm going for an XL, too, at 6'3" w/ 35" inseam. How tall are you?

    Quote Originally Posted by rzozaya1969
    pd... just to play Devil's Advocate, have you posted this question on the Trek forum?
    They don't seem quite so responsive over there in the Trek forum - so far no replies.

    Thanks for your help!

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    Thanks everyone for your input. I'm very close to making the buy. I'm about 95% sure this is the right bike for me - I'm being extra thoughtful because the last bike I bought, my current hardtail, was a poor decision.

    I just donated $500 to the redcross to help those facing hardship in the wake of the recent hurricane to offset the guilt that I feel about even considering a purchase like this when there are those who in the past week have lost everything and are facing a very uncertain future.

    That said, I've got a knot in my stomach - it's taking me quite a bit of self control to weed through the concerns I have because the stumpy is such a sweet, sweet ride!

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    Quote Originally Posted by riverrat
    I will cast my vote for the Stumpy 120 as well, and only partly because I own one.

    5" travel used to only be available on heavy DH bikes, but not anymore. I think the stock 2005 120 Expert came in at about 29 pounds. My size large 120 Pro frame with lightish parts (midweight tires and tubes) weighs about 27. Descending is its forte, but it climbs great with the Talas fork lowered a bit. Doesn't feel like a tank at all. Pretty nimble in technical singletrack.

    Unless you race I think you would love this bike. I do. And the 2006's are better because they have a rear shock lockout...
    Shock lockouts are pointless. I have front and rear lockouts on my 03 stumpy fsr, and I NEVER use them. Can't use them on the fly, and I'm too busy riding to stop and flip the lever when I get to a smooth, flat part of the trail. Compression damped shocks are the way to go anymore. They make lockout levers obsolete.

    5 inches of travel these days makes for a great all-around mountain bike. The extra squish and geometry help them descend well, and efficient shock and suspension designs help them ascend well. Even some 6 inch travel bikes are fairly well-suited to xc riding.

  12. #12
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    I never use the lock out either

    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk
    Shock lockouts are pointless. I have front and rear lockouts on my 03 stumpy fsr, and I NEVER use them. Can't use them on the fly, and I'm too busy riding to stop and flip the lever when I get to a smooth, flat part of the trail. Compression damped shocks are the way to go anymore. They make lockout levers obsolete.

    5 inches of travel these days makes for a great all-around mountain bike. The extra squish and geometry help them descend well, and efficient shock and suspension designs help them ascend well. Even some 6 inch travel bikes are fairly well-suited to xc riding.

    Of course I'm not using the Triad anymore. I use a Pushed AVA Float R on my 04 Stumpy. I like how the suspension is active while climbing, but does not rob me of power. No levers to mess with, just ride.
    Astigmatic Visionary

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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk
    Shock lockouts are pointless. I have front and rear lockouts on my 03 stumpy fsr, and I NEVER use them. Can't use them on the fly, and I'm too busy riding to stop and flip the lever when I get to a smooth, flat part of the trail. Compression damped shocks are the way to go anymore. They make lockout levers obsolete.
    The fact that you personally do not use your lockouts does not make them "pointless".

    I had the Triad shock with a lockout on my 2004 Stumpy and found it quite useful for long fire road ascents, of which there are many here in Oregon. Several rides in the Oakridge area, for example, start with a long tedious climbs on old logging roads, some of which get quite steep. My 2005 120 is not as efficient in such situations.

    I don't think the intended use of a lockout is constant switching on and off, but I found both my front and rear lockouts to be quite easy to flip on and off while riding. I used my rear lockout much more often than my front one.

    I do agree that stable platform and compression damped forks and shocks do much to mitigate bobbing. The Septune on my 120 isn't bad, but it is still not as efficient as a fully locked out rear. Lockouts still have their place, and their utility. That is why manufacturers still offer them, and probably the reason why the Triad (or "brain") is used on 2006 FSRs, while the Septune has been dropped after one year.

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    Quote Originally Posted by S-Works
    I guarantee that if you get a 4 inch travel bike,( an Epic, FSR XC, or an 05 stumpy 100), you will be begging for that extra inch of travel you turned down in a year.

    With shock technology, the Triad, or having the whatever shock you have Pushed, the 5 inch stumpy will climb well, but will be a blast descending with 25% more travel than the 100.
    Good Luck!
    Totally agree, I bought a FSR100 last year, my LBS got a 2005 120mm version back from a customer who dediced to get an Epic, and I really hesitated trading the 2004 version in to buy the (slightly used, but therefore a lot cheaper) 2005.

    Since I live in the Netherlands, 100mm should be plenty of travel, but once you get used to 100mm (from 80), you're just going to push your limits. So in my opinion you might as well get a 120mm version! But it might be useful to use a fork which you can lower down on long climbs.

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    Thanks djska you bring up a good point/question - is the travel adjustable on the front fork? If so, then 4" vs. 5" is kinda moot because I can run at 4" for XC, then add the extra inch if I want/need it.

    Overall I've got the feeling from the board and people I've spoken with that the extra inch is not really a concern, if anything it's a bonus. Thanks for all the advice!

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    Good job! forgot to mention this

    Something that gets overlooked is the lifetime frame warrenty from Spec. That is why I have continued to ride my bike hard knowing that if there is one thing I dont have to worry about.

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    Right on!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by BmoreKen
    Thanks everyone for your input. I'm very close to making the buy. I'm about 95% sure this is the right bike for me - I'm being extra thoughtful because the last bike I bought, my current hardtail, was a poor decision.

    I just donated $500 to the redcross to help those facing hardship in the wake of the recent hurricane to offset the guilt that I feel about even considering a purchase like this when there are those who in the past week have lost everything and are facing a very uncertain future.

    That said, I've got a knot in my stomach - it's taking me quite a bit of self control to weed through the concerns I have because the stumpy is such a sweet, sweet ride!
    BmoreKen,

    Thanks for giving us all a little perspective on what is REAL in life. I also will be purchasing an 06 FSR Pro (tomorrow, actually) and when I'm reminded of just how deep into your pockets some of you will go, sometimes I feel a little guilty... I know that's not your intention and your kind simply act without expectation of gratitude. But Brother, it's there all the time even if you don't hear it everyday!

    So I say, RIDE-ON!, and with each cycling mile we free ourselves just a little from the oil companies who profit from these natural disasters!!!

    No Bad Days!

  18. #18
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    I would lean towards the Epic....

    I would lean towards the Epic if I were you--for what you describe, the 130mm of travel is likely to be overkill.

    I have a 2004 Stumpy FSR with 100mm of travel, am a cross-country rider who prefers climbs to descents, I ride marathons 2-3 times per year, rides quite a bit harder than what you describe, and I am not small--195 lbs with legs like tree trunks. For me, the 100mm of travel is more than plenty and I think I bottomed the thing out 4 or 5 times all season. Sure, more travel would have been nice on those 4 or 5 occasions, but do you buy a bike to make sure it handles the exceptions, or the one that better fits the other 99% of the riding you do?

    I bought my bike late last year and was deciding between 2004 100mm's and 2005 120's, and went with the 100. I have not regretted my decision at all, and think for cross country riding like you described, 120 or the 130 that the 2006 models will have is overkill. Specialized is essentially turning the Stumpjumper into what the Enduro used to be to (though much lighter!) help avoid market cannibalization between the Epic and the Stumpy.

    Still, you have to ride both--I have not seen or ridden a 2006, so I cannot say what its suspension characteristics are, but the Epic seems a better bet.

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