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  1. #1
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    Pro pedal at a trail like Oleta?

    Quick questions for those who have a fox shock like the RP23 with the pro pedal function. Do you use the shock more in the open position or in the pro pedal position at a trail like Oleta? Do you ever use it in trails down here? (Markham, Oleta, Quiet Waters...).

  2. #2
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    Are you racing? Which bike do you have? I have a Pivot, which has an 'anti-bob' suspension design. If I was just trail riding I'd go PP off, if I was racing I'd try out the course with it on PP1 and see if it is tolerable over all the roots there.

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    I have a Marin Mount Vision and I have only raced once there, but I was wondering regardless of the bike if anybody used the pro-pedal often at a place with Oleta's characteristics.

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    Quote Originally Posted by danvar
    I have a Marin Mount Vision and I have only raced once there, but I was wondering regardless of the bike if anybody used the pro-pedal often at a place with Oleta's characteristics.
    Yeah, but doesn't it kinda depend on what you're interested in...speed or comfort? Tons of racers ride hardtails out there, but I'm sure it's not too comfortable. Fox gives you all of the those settings so you can choose depending on what your goals and suspension design is, which is why I asked. I'm sure people use both all the time, but unless someone has the same goal and setup as you, I'm not sure their answer will mean much to you.

  5. #5
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    Pro-pedal is for elimination of pedal bob to make pedalling more efficiant with less bounce. I would think that on a rooty trail like Oleta you would benefit from using Pro-pedal.
    "That which does not kill you makes you stronger"

  6. #6
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    I ride a 4 bar bike with the PP on the majority of the time. If I had something with VPP or DW link I might reconsider that, but it helps make things a lot more efficient, and my XC bike isn't exactly built to be super plush or long travel, so I've decided I'd rather have a more efficient pedal stroke.
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  7. #7
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    I used PP on 1 at Oleta
    Happiness depends more on the inward disposition of mind than on outward circumstances. Benjamin Franklin

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    I have a Fisher HiFi with a two setting Pro Pedal. At all the parks down here I basically reach down and switch it from PP on smoother trails and back to full soft on rougher trails like FIU, Christmas Tree, and Oysters Ridge.

    I've been wondering lately if going over sections that are rough but not crazy with PP on could actually damage the shock or not.....

  9. #9
    PMK
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thameth
    I've been wondering lately if going over sections that are rough but not crazy with PP on could actually damage the shock or not.....
    A properly working shock won't care, however, if you talk with many of the suspension frame designers and builders word is it will destroy the frame over time.

    Most frame designers and builders want to comply with customer requests of light weight suspension bikes. They design on the basis of suspended performance. Using PP on rough terrain, or anywhere loads are high, adds a lot of additional loads into the frame on account of it not moving with the terrain. Over time this will stress the frame and may see cracks, disbonds or delam type failure at or around shock mounts, pivots and so forth.

    Depending upon which shock you run PP on, it may have 2, 3, or multiple settings. You should really experiment on a ride and find what is best for you. If you notice you constantly run in firmer PP settings, the shock should be revalved so it is firmer on damping and can be run with less PP.

    Don't forget also that on many dampers, improper rebound settings will effect how compression feels, which in turn relates to the PP.

    PK

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    Danvr, I ride a MV too and I usually ride with PP on in the 1 setting at Oleta and Markaham. I also flip off and on if I know it is going to be very rooty or rocky. If your sag is set properly the Marins don't bob very much.

    pmk, I could see a shock with more of a true lock out destroying a frame, but isn't PP just LSC dampening? I ride with it and I rarely feel any hard hits from it. Not completely disagreeing with you; I just didn't think PP would have that affect. The Marins I and Danvr ride have the linkages on the downtube and look overly gusseted.

    I do have a freind whos seat tube recently sbapped and his shock is a full lock out. (Manitou shock) He says it blows of but we have rode the whole trail got back to the trail head and he has said " man my shock was locked out" the o-ring was still at the top of the shaft.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Pro pedal at a trail like Oleta?-mv-linkage.jpg  


  11. #11
    PMK
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    That's the thing, a lot also depends on how beefy the frame is. True XC frames are light at all cost, and take a true beating even on PP.

    More heavy duty stuff like freeride stuff is not as big an issue.

    PP is a form of damping, actually a type of threshold setup if set to full firm. This is what makes it no big deal for smooth rolling sections. When in PP3 settings, and ridden in rough terrain, it still transmits a lot of load into the frame and mounts.

    My last suspension discussion with a manufacturer was Sherwood Gibson of Ventana. There is so much that goes into designing rear suspension rising or falling rates, angles, progression, and so forth, but this is all for nothing when PP is selected, plus everything must be built a bit stronger to withstand all the cyclic stresses as opposed to the occasional bottoming. We both kind cringe at PP but it is a required evil.

    PK

  12. #12
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    DanVar, I wouldn't bother with PP at all... FSs suck anyway. ;-)

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by OSOK
    DanVar, I wouldn't bother with PP at all... FSs suck anyway. ;-)
    Stalker......

  14. #14
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    Lol!!!!

  15. #15
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    Teehee

  16. #16
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    PMK, very intresting. I had no idea that PP could affect the spring rate, isn't PP LSC dampening just keeps the shock from compressing under light pressure (pedaling).

    (not being a wise ass)

  17. #17
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    I put some more air in my shock, I think it is set up properly now. I rode with no PP on Sat and it was great. The design of the suspension works great with the shock set up with the right sag. NO PP needed.

    ( 220 psi in RP23, I weigh 235lbs aprox with gear)

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