Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Alabama Pinhoti

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    13

    Alabama Pinhoti

    I was at a website looking for maps to the local colman lake horse trails that are open to bikes when i cam across a statement on the page that said the pinhoti was also open to bikes and horses.
    I am very interested in riding the pinhoti as it has many technical and interesting parts. I also dont want to do anything illegal and get slapped with a fine. So does anyone kno if it is open to bikes in alabama? Who can i get in contact with to ask about this?

    http://www.forestcamping.com/dow/southern/tallcmp.htm
    The statement is at the bottom of the Pine Glen campground information block.

  2. #2
    Not Smart Enough to Quit
    Reputation: xray_ed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    622
    I have "heard" that the Pinhoti is hiker only, but like you, no where do I see anything banning bikes. Having the Pinhoti as an MTB trail would just about turn Alabama into a mountain bike destination. Link it up with the Georgia section & LOOK OUT!

    If the Georgia Pinhoti is legal, I don't see why the Alabama part would be illegal. Of course, the hikers may SAY it is, but who sets the rules?

    I did find this; http://www.pinhotitrailalliance.org/sitemap.html
    The standing eight count & three knockdown rules are in effect on this trail.

    http://compvelo.com/content/

  3. #3
    Not Smart Enough to Quit
    Reputation: xray_ed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    622
    Looking at that PTA website it seems that the southern end of the Pinhoti parallels the northern half of this dirt road route that I rode with some buddies a few weeks ago. Here's the route;

    http://www.mapmyride.com/ride/united...28076337288671

    The guys call this the 'Skyline Ride" and even though it's dirt road & not singletrack, the climbing & distance (the whole thing out & back is about 52 miles) makes for a super challenging ride. Best bet is to park in the middle off of hwy 77 (about where mile marker 15 is on the map) ride out & back one way, reload with water at the car, then do the other end.
    The standing eight count & three knockdown rules are in effect on this trail.

    http://compvelo.com/content/

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    13
    So i found on that PTA wbsite it says bikers are not allowed on any of the alabama sections. This conflicts my earlier findings though.

    http://www.pinhotitrailalliance.org/trailusers.html

    Now the question becomes who is correct?

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cgreen9761's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    212
    I can't speak for the Alabama sections but I know that the vast majority of the GA Pinhoti is bike legal and ROCKS!!!!!!!!!! IMBA even gave it "epic" trail status.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: munisano's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    111
    I did a speed-hike of the entire 335 mile Pinhoti Trail from Flagg Mountain, AL to the northern terminus at the Benton McKaye Trail and I can honestly say that a lot of work would have to be done on the Alabama side to make it more mountain bike friendly (should it be opened to bikes). The Georgia Pinhoti was, by far, much less technical, flowy and smooth, definitely built with mountain bikes in mind. The Alabama side is way more rocky and technical and would be very difficult to mountain bike most of it. While there are certainly sections that would make for great mountain biking, the Coleman lake area comes to mind, the other big problem is there are a number of Wilderness Areas that the Pinhoti passes through so that means the trail would be off limits to all mechanized transportation (Cheaha Wilderness, Dugger Wilderness, etc..). Georgia vs. Alabama Pinhoti are two totally different beasts in terms of trail construction, marking, etc...

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    214
    The Georgia Pinhoti was initially for hikers and horses, no mountain bikes allowed. However, most of the Georgia Pinhoti Trails Association were mountain bikers. They eventually convinced the District Rangers to open most of the Pinhoti trails in the Dalton, GA area to mountain bikers. (They later formed the NWGA chapter of SORBA and two of the GA Pinhoti Association presidents went on to become president of the NWGA SORBA.)

    That is a great way to effect change. Join the organization in mass, complete a lot of trail work with the group and earn the members and land manager's respect, get elected to office, and then as the the leaders of the organization who are building the trail make the request to add mountain bikers as a legitimate user group.

    Change from the inside is great, and if you do it properly, by joining and doing trail work, then almost no one will resent you for it. Instead they will respect you. The fact is hikers only users are "aging out", either because they are getting to old to get out on the trail and attend meetings, or passing away. Seriously, look at the pictures on the website of most hiker-only groups. They do not contain many picture of young people.

    They are being replaced with younger hikers, who also mountain bike and view mountain bikers as a legitimate user group. It is only a matter of time before all the old school hikers, with anti-mountain bike attitudes, are gone and are replaced by pro-mountain biker leaders in their organizations.

    Either through natural movement or through a push by mountain bikers to change a group from the inside we will eventually see the majority of trails opened to mountain biking in 15 to 20 years. (It also helps that park managers are retiring and being replaced by younger mangers who view mountain bikers more favorably.)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •