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  1. #301
    ravingbikefiend
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    "Single speeds are dumb. I had a single speed when I was 4. Someone said, "because they're the new thing...mainstream". How dumb. Because everyone else is doing it...lets all run out and buy a bike that technology has left behind."

    It was once said that mountain biking was a fad.

    Single speeds and fixed gear bikes were once the realm of a small group of cyclists, were looked on as being a fad, but have now become very mainstream.

    I specialize in gear reduction therapy and even if someone doesn't want to go to a single speed many would like to be running a simplified drive like a 1 by x where x can be as little as 2 speeds or as many as 9.
    I ride with 65'er...he's a mountain goat....But then again, we need to throw him in the mud and pack his pockets with lead shot before a scale will read him. - Psycho Mike

    -Environmental stickers don't mean shite when they are stuck to CARS!-

  2. #302
    cdkrenz
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    I hope you're not mad that I like my singlespeed, and that I think another would also enjoy a singlespeed. But if you are, that's okay.

    Peace friend.
    CK

  3. #303
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    newbie here

    Quote Originally Posted by donkey
    Your trolling is getting really tired. Go back to the women's lounge or better yet......find a new forum to waste your time with.

    How about some ride related content from ya?

    B
    Please dont send them back to the women's lounge

    Newbie rider here. Ok, well newbie sort of- have ridden at different times in life...coming back to it as a commuter now, tired of driving when I could be riding.
    Just picked up a singlespeed, freewheel. Bianchi grizzly mtb conversion.

    Why do I ride a SS? A new challenge for me. Ever get stuck in a workout and you plateau? Same theory. I teach dance, so my bod gets used to the same grind and range of motion I put it through... riding a SS gives it a new task and challenge... plus SS are so simple in design, its a good way for a newbie like me to learn how to wrench.

    I also have a huge heavy geared mongoose mtb that I picked up 6 years ago. I love it, but It was just too much bike for me, plus its heavy as hell. I'll probably hang on to it and strip it down some and play with it.
    Hood to Coast 2008

  4. #304
    Number Projector
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    SS Renaissance

    Quote Originally Posted by Ryder1
    A rider Born anew: strong and self-sufficient.
    While not a bike intended for the mountains, I picked up my first single-speed the other day, a 2007 Jamis Sputnik. I live about 200 yards away from NYC, so I went with something built for the road.

    The bike is a joy to ride and I am completely hooked. The gearing is tall (48x16) but so far completely do-able. SSing makes me feel like a kid again.

    Now I want one for the trails. I could always convert the hardtail...
    When I see an adult on a bicycle, I do not despair for the future of the human race.
    -H.G. Wells

  5. #305
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    because i hate rear dees.

  6. #306
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    Why ride SS?

    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    I don't get it. With different cogs and gear ratios it seems like having a 21, 24, or 27 speed would be superior to a singlespeed. So what is the benefit? Is it only weight? I have a bike I could convert but I am having trouble justifying it.
    For me, it's simplicity, variety, and challenge. I don't want to elaborate on these things but I am sure you will understand after trying out the SS. Let me just say that the first time I went riding on my SS, it was like being a kid on a bike again. You'll love the "purity" associated with SS riding. That being said, if you can afford it, ride hardtail and fs also. Variety is good....

  7. #307
    ravingbikefiend
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    At one time, all bikes were singlespeeds or fixed gears so what is new is really something old that has come back because it worked well then and works well now.

    My most recent acquistion is a 1955 Raleigh Lenton road bike that is sporting a flip hib hub with a 16 tooth fixed cog and an 18 tooth freewheel.

    I ride SS and fixed on the road and on the trail and love every minute of it.
    I ride with 65'er...he's a mountain goat....But then again, we need to throw him in the mud and pack his pockets with lead shot before a scale will read him. - Psycho Mike

    -Environmental stickers don't mean shite when they are stuck to CARS!-

  8. #308
    Steel is Real
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    SS 4 School

    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    I don't get it. With different cogs and gear ratios it seems like having a 21, 24, or 27 speed would be superior to a singlespeed. So what is the benefit? Is it only weight? I have a bike I could convert but I am having trouble justifying it.



    I built my SS for my commuter bike for use to school and down town, because my full suspension was to nice to leave at the bike rack in down town boise. Don't get me wrong boise is an awsome low theft place but at least two friends of mine had their bikes stripped. Basically I was only building it SS for the low cost. After I researched more on the internet I saw people were using them on the trails, so I slapped some treads on and took the hills. It is a great workout and good training.

  9. #309
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    I must say that I have respect for you guys that ride SS (as well as fixed). I'll probably always have a gearie, but that Redline Monocog 29er has been looking sweeter and sweeter by the day. I definately want to give it a go myself.

  10. #310
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    I ride 2 types of terrain where I live: urban assault in the downtown core, and riding the North Shore when I have time. I ride urban everyday to work and I use a rigid SS for that. It's made my mountain biking stronger because it's a singlespeed and climbing hills is tougher. My quads went from an "in-shape" sort of look to Franco Columbu style in a matter of weeks when I first started riding. No need to lift weights for your legs when riding a singlespeed aggressively. Doing drops on a rigid also requires more commitment and finesse than on a suspension bike. I regularly drop 4 feet on my rigid and it's made dropping on the Shore a helluva lot easier.
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  11. #311
    Chrystal
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    Because it is different and very addicting. I took my FS geary out for a ride last night, I missed my SS!

  12. #312
    old part timer
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    Because I have a room full of road bike stuff and I need something different. It appeases my sense of why do I need another pieces of bicycling equipment and is a fun bike to ride.

  13. #313
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    Quote Originally Posted by kawboy8
    Single speeds are dumb. I had a single speed when I was 4. Someone said, "because their the new thing...mainstream". How dumb. Because everyone else is doing it...lets all run out and buy a bike that technology has left behind.
    Well I don't know if single speeds are dumb or not. But what I do know is that they are not good for bikers who ride up alot of hills and who have had knee problems or knee surgery at one time or another. And that would be people like current or former gymnasts, football players, motocross racers, etc., etc. When going up a steep hill a single speed would be potentially disastrous to anyone who is "knee concious." Someone with sensitive knees needs to be able to "spin" up those steep hills as opposed to "mashing" up them. And that's where a single speed just wouldn't cut it.

  14. #314
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandiman
    Well I don't know if single speeds are dumb or not. But what I do know is that they are not good for bikers who ride up alot of hills and who have had knee problems or knee surgery at one time or another. And that would be people like current or former gymnasts, football players, motocross racers, etc., etc. When going up a steep hill a single speed would be potentially disastrous to anyone who is "knee concious." Someone with sensitive knees needs to be able to "spin" up those steep hills as opposed to "mashing" up them. And that's where a single speed just wouldn't cut it.
    I disagree. Mashing up a hill is standing, but spinning up a hill is sitting. I think the knees are anatomically more capable of handling stress when pedalling standing than when pedalling sitting. When the topic of knees comes up every year, you'll hear from a score of folks who had less-than-perfect knees whose condition improved after SS'ing for awhile. I thik that what happens is that the muscles surrounding the knee become stronger and are then more capable of stabilizing the joint. It's similar to how Physical Therapists strengthen the muscles of the lower extremity after a patient sprains his ankle. Increasing the muscle strength provides more stability.

  15. #315
    just like a speeder-bike
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandiman
    Well I don't know if single speeds are dumb or not. But what I do know is that they are not good for bikers who ride up alot of hills and who have had knee problems or knee surgery at one time or another. And that would be people like current or former gymnasts, football players, motocross racers, etc., etc. When going up a steep hill a single speed would be potentially disastrous to anyone who is "knee concious." Someone with sensitive knees needs to be able to "spin" up those steep hills as opposed to "mashing" up them. And that's where a single speed just wouldn't cut it.
    I'm sure that's true for many, but here's a counterpoint that's probably been raised before: I'm 36, I've had my right knee scoped twice (athroscopic surgery for cartelige tears) -- I think my doc last indicated that due to those surgeries, my right interior miniscus has lost about 35-45% of its original volume.

    I have no knee problems riding SS. Granted, I also ride road (gearie) and a FS mtn. bike (gearie)... I'm sure variety helps. But mainly, I think it counts how you ride your SS. I try not to sit and grind too much -- very knee intensive. Rather, when the going gets tough, I'm out of the saddle and churning as smoothly as I can (mainly focused on saving energy, as opposed to focusing on saving my knees). Hope I'm not the only lucky one who gets away with it.

  16. #316
    singlespeedAdam
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    I disagree. Mashing up a hill is standing, but spinning up a hill is sitting. I think the knees are anatomically more capable of handling stress when pedalling standing than when pedalling sitting. When the topic of knees comes up every year, you'll hear from a score of folks who had less-than-perfect knees whose condition improved after SS'ing for awhile. I thik that what happens is that the muscles surrounding the knee become stronger and are then more capable of stabilizing the joint. It's similar to how Physical Therapists strengthen the muscles of the lower extremity after a patient sprains his ankle. Increasing the muscle strength provides more stability.
    I have a knee condition, and riding SS has helped me. my knee gets aggrivated from moving too quickly, or repetatively. therefore, spinning up a hill is a lot harder for me than standing and slowly powering up in a high SS gear. if a hill is too long i ache by the time i get to the top more than my geared friends, but they have good knees, and the ache isnt half as bad as if i'd spinned up.

  17. #317
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    The biggest thing that surprised me about SS was how much of my regular trails were do-able. I would say about 80-90% of the time I didn't even care that I had one gear. 5% I cared but got up it anyway without much problem. 5% I walked.

    It is really nice not to be going anaerobic the whole time on climbs.

    Learning to blast up hills can only have a positive impact on your geared riding.
    All problems in mountain biking can be solved by going faster, except the ones that are caused by going too fast.

  18. #318
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    Got my Monocog 29er and it is just the coolest. I do hate the fact that it was built by some poor kid in china. I just don't have the budget or patience to always shop my conscience. BUT, the ride is crazy fun, and we got some hills here. Like pinkheadedbug said, I can do a lot more of my local trails straight out of the box than I thought I would be able to do. And the one thing I dig, and haven't read here, is how super quiet it is. No rear d slap or chain slap, just my heaving and laughing

  19. #319
    cdkrenz
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    Amen Alpka,

    I agree with the quiet statement, and the fact that you can't always shop your conscience. Get on and go singlespeeder!

    - CK

  20. #320
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    why I SS. cuz it's nice, its fun, its cheap for the college kids to keep it up, its my favorite bike.

    when I wanna ride all I have to do is get that bike cuz "it just works"

    thats why I ride SS

  21. #321
    cdkrenz
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    You go RODD!
    CK

  22. #322
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    why singlespeed?

    no frills, no excuses to relax from pedaling, less maintenance, pure.....

  23. #323
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    Converted my other 21 speed hybrid bike to SS and it is awesome! I was using magic gear (ie. no chain tensioner on a vertical drop out bike) and it is great. I remember flying down the trail and it was so quiet, I had a moment that I feel like I was flying...very erie feeling but so addicting. Also , Being not a very technical person, it's empowering to be able to do a conversion and know that I can easily fix my bike now that it's much simplier.
    The chain did started slipping so I just installed a chain tensioner but because of my busy schedule I haven't tested it yet =( Maybe this weekend.

  24. #324
    Fossil
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    Here's my two cents for what its worth (I guess that's why were all here, right?). At 21 years of age my experience may not be as robust as other people's here on the forum, but in working at a bike shop for the last three years I've had some revelations.

    First, most people don't like things that are hard. People need the lightest and most fully suspended bike they can get. They don't seem to fathom the idea of overcoming the terrain or their weaknesses (physical or otherwise) by cultivating their skills. One could ride faster if they practiced their handling instead of buying another inch of suspension on the latest and greatest fully suspended bike. Also, one could become faster if they shifted out of their granny gear from time to time, or... rode single speed. Gains which are bought are had too cheaply. Bicycling is supposed to be hard, if you want something easy put a motor between your legs (not meant to be directly offensive to any motorcyclists in the forum, unless you are lazy as well).

    Secondly, and MOST IMPORTANTLY, after three years in the bicycle industry I know two things. First, I love bicycles; I love commuting, I love racing, I love mountain biking, and I love road riding. Given the proper finances and time, I'd probably love cross too. Second, I hate the bike industry. I utterly detest the bike industry. Every single day, we service some poorly engineered piece of crap. Every component manufacturer in the industry, with the exception of a bold few (Phil, white ind., etc.) who refuse to make crap, makes shitty components. Expensive parts perform better the cheaper ones without a doubt, but they don't seem to be any less prone to failure. The bike industry, for the most part makes bad products, and I don't want to buy that stuff. Aside from making bad products the bike industry is full of bad innovators. Every year Interbike makes a mockery of bicycling. It's not innovating when you take a perfectly good part and put some carbon on it. It's not innovating to make something lighter, innovating would be to make it work better, which is certainly not the case. The bicycle industry is responsible for producing such inane ********. As such, I wish to purchase as few goods from that industry as possible.

    That's why I ride single speed. As an insider who's seen how lame this industry is, I only want to patronize companies who I think have a right vision of how bicycle parts should be made. I also want to triumph over terrain on account of my own skill and strength. In addition, I don't want to replace bushings or do any other superfluous maintenance. I also don't want to ride an ugly bike (read; specialized or other companies who are producing these alien-quasi-dirt-bike-turds). I want to ride a bike that looks like what it is; a bike. Pure and simple.
    "Quelle vérité que ces montagnes bornent, qui est mensonge qui se tient au delà?

    -Michel de Montaigne

  25. #325
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    Why do something just to be the in thing. Just Set your gear to the highest one and dont shift How hard is that. Sometimes when I ride I set a RULE for myself no shiffting I stay in the highest gear to gain leg strengh and endurance to climb. Doing this has helped me become a more disciplined rider and a stronger one. However me and a guy at work have thought about building single speed crusers just for fun. Single speed mt bike hum My friends boy and girls ride them, personaly I wouldn't mabey when I become more skill full and a stronger rider I like to give myself a break now and then.

  26. #326
    bui
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    Quote Originally Posted by themeatman
    Why do something just to be the in thing. Just Set your gear to the highest one and dont shift How hard is that. Sometimes when I ride I set a RULE for myself no shiffting I stay in the highest gear to gain leg strengh and endurance to climb. ...

    Single speed mt bike hum My friends boy and girls ride them, personaly I wouldn't mabey when I become more skill full and a stronger rider I like to give myself a break now and then.
    Ok....then Set [sic] a RULE to get out of this forum.

    You ran this race with no real heart
    Yeah right back at the start
    You'd already lost it

  27. #327
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    single speeds

    Hey
    Way down here in new Zealand I have been modifing old steel frames and custom making them single speeds from 1999. www.kiwibikes.co.nz . It really is an amazing thing to try, only if you are set up correctly!!. The one thing I notice with SS is that it gives you very quickly strong cycling legs and the abilitiy to pick better lines because you have to . When you then jump on your geared bike you will notice after sometime how you can ride higher gears. Exsample not use that granny ring as often.
    Plus take a ride on a single speed really early in the morning and its bliss with only the sound of your tyres running over the ground.

  28. #328
    fear this
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiwibikes
    Hey
    Way down here in new Zealand I have been modifing old steel frames and custom making them single speeds from 1999. www.kiwibikes.co.nz . It really is an amazing thing to try, only if you are set up correctly!!. The one thing I notice with SS is that it gives you very quickly strong cycling legs and the abilitiy to pick better lines because you have to . When you then jump on your geared bike you will notice after sometime how you can ride higher gears. Exsample not use that granny ring as often.
    Plus take a ride on a single speed really early in the morning and its bliss with only the sound of your tyres running over the ground.
    Yeah, I really enjoy pedaling my SS. I'm geared 32-16 and while it makes it difficult to pop up with the pedals, it forces you to use more of your body and has tremendously increased my leg strength, which has in turn had the effect of supercharging my mountain biking stamina. I use the SS primarily on concrete and asphalt, ie. mainly urban riding. I frequently ride with some BMX riders who've taught me how to session benches, stair gaps, and rearrange wooden palette, amongst other skills. . Riding urban is convenient for me while working during the week because I can literally session things on my way to and from work, lunch, running errands, etc. Initially, the entire purpose of all of this riding was to benefit my mountain skills and strength, but I've come to realize that my mountain riding also improves my urban skills. I am completely in love with riding.
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  29. #329
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    I got my Inbreed as a training tool, turns out I really enjoy riding SS. The SS is making me a stronger rider and the simplicity kinda makes you feel like a kid again!!

  30. #330
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    I have a singlespeed because I said STOP to that ridiculous things called derailleurs. How can someone say "technology" when we are talking about little pieces of metal that pull and push the chain on that medieval torture machine that we name as "cassette". I actually really LOVE all the singlespeed thing (my main bike is a single), but I'm not really against speeds, I'm against derailleurs.

  31. #331
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    Sort of

    Quote Originally Posted by Sandiman
    Well I don't know if single speeds are dumb or not. But what I do know is that they are not good for bikers who ride up alot of hills and who have had knee problems or knee surgery at one time or another. And that would be people like current or former gymnasts, football players, motocross racers, etc., etc. When going up a steep hill a single speed would be potentially disastrous to anyone who is "knee concious." Someone with sensitive knees needs to be able to "spin" up those steep hills as opposed to "mashing" up them. And that's where a single speed just wouldn't cut it.
    I agree there is a time and a place for single speeds. And as a single speeder how has had some serious knee damage in the past via skiing I would have to disagree with you. I know many good riders who have had knee surgery and come back to kick some serious ass on single speeds. Also I am a PT student currently and would never personally advise someone with a knee injury to jump on a single speed anytime soon, but if someone finishes a proper rehab then I see no problem with it. Now this comes down to case by case. To close do what you like if you have a fully rehabilitated knee within your own limits. I ride single speeds because I like the suffering, I like the simplicity. But that is me.

  32. #332
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    There's a broad array of reasons for any given rider to at least attempt a Singlespeed; ranging from being the "in" thing to being that hard-ass that just does it. Other reasons may include, but are not limited to: simplicity, no chain-suck, no chain slap, cheaper assembly/upkeep, lighter bicycle, less parts overall=more expensive parts individually, a test of one's own will, greater understanding of one's capabilities, kicking the "gearheads" asses uphill, quieter bike=more pleasant riding experience, bells rule (not limited to SS of course), it's different even though more people participating can make it less different a.k.a more "mainstream" (take note fixie kids of San Fran), having something in common with other "eccentrics". potential to induce overuse of "quotations", to support the little manufacturers of the industry, 26 less gears can lead to one solution for your riding, no pussies; do it or don't, pure aesthetics, we're masochists, personal expression through the medium of your bike, a brand new friend who relies on you to not just bail out when things get tough, along with a plethora of other reasons. Side effects can include: independence, knee issues, gaining/losing respect from fellow riders, a new taste of endorphins, inability to give up, stubbornness, greater respect for all that is simple, etc. Anyone feel free to elaborate on my contribution; or rip on it if you may. Really whatever makes you happy. You know, kinda like riding a bike.

  33. #333
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    Yeah, what HE said.

    And I've been SSing for 5 years or so and don't CARE what anybody else rides, I don't have a geared mountain bike anymore and don't want one. Rode yesterday with my DSG partner--he doesn't own a geared fat-tire either. He's 46 and I'm 41. Hammer or walk.

    Going to try fixed off-road next...

    I ride for fun and competition--not to unnerstand how/why everybody else does it. You have fun? I happy.
    I would rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy. W.C. Fields

  34. #334
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    I just converted one of my old racing hardtails into a SS and I confess I'm overwhelmed. The bike to me is light, just over 21pounds but after pedaling it around I just don't know if I can make it up some of the longer, more challenging hills around my area. I converted my bike under the assumption it would be less wear and tear on my derraileurs, less maintenance, and I know it will be, but how the heck am I going to make it up long muddy climbs, or even flat muddy sections where I live? I understand it will help me learn technique carrying speed and will make me stronger, but where I live it can get pretty muddy, and the hills are quite long. I guess at this point I'm not sure what to think about SS, but I can already tell this will be quite a challenge. I don't want to discourage anyone from converting a bike to a SS, but I have to say perhaps it's not goingto be everyones' cup of tea. I've been riding and racing on and off since 96 so it's not like I'm a begginner, but I guess I have to give it some more time. I will say it beats spinning indoors for hours at a time.

  35. #335
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    Quote Originally Posted by iWiLRiDe
    ...but how the heck am I going to make it up long muddy climbs, or even flat muddy sections where I live? I understand it will help me learn technique carrying speed and will make me stronger, but where I live it can get pretty muddy, and the hills are quite long. I guess at this point I'm not sure what to think about SS, but I can already tell this will be quite a challenge.
    Ever ridden in muck so bad that shifters/derailleurs became useless?!--thassa single speed.

    When the options are limited to: SIT, STAND, or WALK, then you'll learn a lot more about what you can and can't do. You won't find that here pushing keys. enjoy.
    I would rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy. W.C. Fields

  36. #336
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    Quote Originally Posted by iWiLRiDe
    I just converted one of my old racing hardtails into a SS and I confess I'm overwhelmed. The bike to me is light, just over 21pounds but after pedaling it around I just don't know if I can make it up some of the longer, more challenging hills around my area. I converted my bike under the assumption it would be less wear and tear on my derraileurs, less maintenance, and I know it will be, but how the heck am I going to make it up long muddy climbs, or even flat muddy sections where I live? I understand it will help me learn technique carrying speed and will make me stronger, but where I live it can get pretty muddy, and the hills are quite long. I guess at this point I'm not sure what to think about SS, but I can already tell this will be quite a challenge. I don't want to discourage anyone from converting a bike to a SS, but I have to say perhaps it's not goingto be everyones' cup of tea. I've been riding and racing on and off since 96 so it's not like I'm a begginner, but I guess I have to give it some more time. I will say it beats spinning indoors for hours at a time.
    I think everyone is a bit discouraged on their first couple of rides on a SS unless they are an absolute beast as it is a different style of riding and takes a little getting used to. That said, the question I have is what gear ratio you are using. A lot of people will tell you to start with 2:1 with like 32:16 or something like that but for a lot of people that is just too steep of a gear if there are a lot of steep climbs in their area. In my area if I ride the local trails around town I could probably use a gear ratio a bit steeper than that and be fine but if I head 15 minutes out of town to another main riding area some of the climbs would be unrideable for me at that gearing. Because I do a lot of my riding out there I typically keep 32:18 on my SS and a few even go with 32:20. It is sort of a macho thing to force yourself to utilize a gear ratio that is monstrous and one has to be realistic about it. However, what feels brutal for you now might be a lot easier in a month. You really have to find a balance between having a low enough gear to climb the hills in your typical rides yet not be so easy that you spin out too easily on the flats. I would recommend using the absolutely hardest gear you can ride your typical rides on and make adjustments from there as you get more used to it. You'll find that due to climbing with hard gears out of the saddle a lot that you're arms and shoulders will really be feeling it after a long sustained climb as in the steeper sections you're really pulling against you're handlebars to push down with your legs.

    As for the mud, it is definitely a lot easier on a SS as typically you can't shift after a little bit in it anyhow as your derailleurs and cables get so gunked up. The key there is having the right tires that will shed the mud as well as possible. Just how muddy are we talking about? If you are talking about deep, nasty mud that leaves deep ruts then I'd suggest that riding on them is inappropriate as the damage to the trails is just too great. Try to ride on harder packed, better draining trails that aren't going to be torn to hell with tons of deep ruts and so on. Around here there are certain trails that are just to be avoided when the weather is really wet as we don't want to destroy our trails and there are plenty of others that are much better to ride in the winter months.

  37. #337
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    If you have to ask why you wouldn't understand.

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    If you have to aask why you wouldn't understand.

  39. #339
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    Hey Burkeman, thanks for the input. I'm currently running a 34-17 which is pretty normal from what i hear. As far as the mud, it's not deep but more slick than anything else. It loves to get onto your tires making you potentially spin out. I wouldn't ride any trails that I believe I would harm, gotta save the trails for the spring and summer and I would hate for our trails to get closed to do erosion. I guess that I'm just going to have to get more used to the gearing i'm at, and if it's too hard I think I may just run more teeth in the back, perhaps a 20 tooth like you have. I think I have to be patient because along time ago when I started training on roadbikes, the gearing seemed harsh but the bike was so light it made it manageable. Perhaps this will be the case too?

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    capn cowbell, sorry to say but it is not quite the same thing. There is an inherently efficient feeling that you get from removing all the extra stuff on a gearie and just pedaling. Rendering your shifters incapable is not SS. It is a broken down gearie. Nothing worse than that.

    I converted my 1995 Giant ATX frame to a SS for about $75. Added a circa '98 Marzocchi Atom Bomb for another $80. Presto, a "new" bike for $155. Might upgrade to a better one sometime, but $155 to try a different sport is way cheap!

  41. #341
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    I would agree with oldskoolgiant, it's not the samething a SS. It's a step in the right direction. But nothing beats the feeling of looking down at your bars on a long uphill only to notice grips and brakes!
    mtb29er.com Trying to be the best 29er site!

  42. #342
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    Quote Originally Posted by bike supremacist
    First, most people don't like things that are hard.
    you mean like shifting while riding and clearing techy stuff, or having to haul the extra weight of all those gears?

    i can think of one real good reason to go SS. it's easier to clean the mud off (at least that's my hypothesis): i don't have to worry about pivot bearings and derailleurs and cassettes and all that stuff. so, in an effort to avoid that (cause it's too hard), i am seriously thinking about building one up--kinda blows your theory, no?

  43. #343
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    Riding a rigid SS has been awesome. A fast downhill can feel scary again. You can experience that moment of inertness at the top of a climb when you're not sure if you'll be able to get moving again (until you dig deep and muscle it out). The bike is so simple to deal with. That doesn't mean I won't continue to ride my geared bike with a sus. fork but the variety is great, especially when the trails become monotonous (and for me they never do!).

    Enjoy your next ride---whenever and wherever that may be!

  44. #344
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    Cool-blue Rhythm SS Reasoning

    SS is such a simple thing mechanically but technically complex. I've been riding 26" geared bikes for 3 years and it's gotten to the point I never use the granny or big ring. I was curious about SS especially w/ 29ers to make it more interesting! I built up a Soma Juice SS and right now I'm in my 4th month and I'm in the best shape of my life! I'm like that guy "Jared" on Subway commercials. Two times out of the week I ride SS and really teaches me discipline for the best line to take uphill. I flew past all my friends who had $$$ dualies and HT's and they were shocked I passed them up in one gear. I must say though that SS are NOT race bikes but more like ultra fitness & technique trainers.

    In fact I just rode on my 26" the past weekend and the bike felt sooo light, I did a 3.5 mile steep technical climb in 2nd gear only! Well, not purely SS but 1x9 drive. It seems more advance riders are going to the 1x9 drive but that's another thread in itself.
    Anyways, that's my 2 cents, SS is a simple, ultra fit, technical style of mountain biking. You're certainly not going to beat a 27-speed downhill. What does everyone else think?

  45. #345
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    I've been riding my single speed for about a months; I don't believe how much faster I am on my other bikes now. The hills i used to complain about on the ss are manageable, some even easy. I'm totally glad i converted my hardtail into a ss now, I gotta say initially i was hesitant but the training has been intense and riding a ht has made me smoother on my ds bikes. I got better flow these days, and I can practically climb anything. I hope my experience will help others to convert their old ht into ss.

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    No SS rigids here

    Starting my second year of riding a SS full rigid. Last year caught a glimpse of 2 single speeds and just one was rigid. Not only riding on the trails but in the parking lots, on bike racks on cars riding down the road. I'm just not seeing them. From may until november I ride on average 3 to 4 days a week and I ride when the weather permits through the winter. No doubt about it riding a SS rigid bike is hard but is it that hard that almost everyone succumbs to gears and suspension. As I see it mountian biking is right up there with the rest of society - take the easiest way possible, jump on the band wagon and as long as I and my bike (strapped to the roof of my car) look good in the parking lot who cares. I suppose what they say is true - it's lonely at the top.

  47. #347
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    pros of single

    alright this is how i look at it.
    1. no stuffing around with cables
    2. no derailer to break
    3. more simple no thinking what gear was i kicking arse on last time i was here
    4. no worry about your gears jumping when you are hammering into a jump and you need to throw in 3 more cranks to live through the experiance.

    but the biggest point for me would have to be that you don't have a derailer to break, if you are in the air chuckin a narly trick and things aren't going to plan with your bike flying away from you it hasn't got much to break. i put some little peg like things on mine so that even if it lands on the side with the disc brakes this will hold it up off the ground and nothing nasty can damage the paint work or anything on the back end. p.s. i ride an 07 norco two50.

  48. #348
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    heres my 36er single.
    Has extra wide home made fischer carbon hubs.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  49. #349
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    check out www.riderotorua.com. single speed champs here in New Zealand

  50. #350
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    I'm in the midst of assembling a SS. Why build one you ask? Because I love to work with my hands and I'd like to get into the wonderful world of bike mechanics. Why ride one you ask? Because it is virtually bullet proof - no derailleur to rip off, no gears to bend, smash, destroy. Just two cogs, two brakes and (eventually) some front suspension. Plus I can make it look a little tatty so it won't get nicked.

    Edit: Nice work on the frames there kiwibikes - what's one of your Rohloff frames set one back?

  51. #351
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    New Singlespeeder

    I recently took "the plunge" BIG TIME, not only switching from geared to singlespeed, but also from fully suspended to full rigid, aluminum to steel, and 26er to 29er.

    As a recent convert, only days ago I was wondering what singlespeeding would be like. Here's the best explaination I can give you of what happened on my first ride.

    I had the most fun I've ever had on a bicycle... PERIOD.

    Granted a lot of this probably had to do with being on a brand new bike and I was just excited, however, I've never ridden a quieter, faster, lighter, more compliant bicycle. It does EVERYTHING exactly when you tell it to, exactly the way you tell it to. It climbs like crazy, it accelerates much faster than my old bikes, and it rides silky smooth.

    As to the singlespeed part, the question for this thread: My bike is quiet, has much less to adjust and much less parts that can fail, jam, fall apart/off, generally annoy me, and it makes me ride my bike. One thing I've always hated about my riding is my tendency to drop into the granny gear and spin up tough stuff. It left me walking up hills countless times thinking to myself, "you're a pansy". This bike makes me try (and gives me a great excuse when I can't make it anyway ) but seriously...

    It's just plain fun. I don't know why I guess you really do just have to try it. If you like it you like it, if you don't you don't. I did, and I may never ride geared again.

  52. #352
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    I turned my Surly Karate Monkey into a rigid SS .I have been racing and it wasn't being ridden very much. I didn't see the appeal of riding one gear on singletrack.I get it now.I actually ride(enjoy) the bike more in the sense when I don't pedal I am more focused on the trail and terrain, momentum.Less is more.

  53. #353
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    Ooops! Sorry, wrong thread...
    Last edited by 42hz; 06-11-2008 at 01:50 PM.
    //Harri

  54. #354
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    I'm still a noob to mountain biking but if you had single speed there would be much little to break and it wouldn't be as much of a pain in the neck to fix. And of course it would be lighter. And u would get stronger.

  55. #355
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    My personal testimony as to why the newest and greatest bicycle technologies can't mess with the old school simplicity of a classic ride.

    SINGLE SPEED or SS:

    The first time I came across the idea, was way back in the day. I met a guy from Alabama, named Josh. He was cool-as-a fan, and he was a bicycle mechanic.

    We were neighbors in the college part of Tempe, and we rode our bicycles everywhere. He kicked everyone's ass. His bike had ONE gear. I just chalked it up as - he was in really good shape.

    I remember how clean his bike looked - half as many cables hanging from the handlebars, no clunky derailleurs hanging low and weighing his ride down. Eight less cogs in the middle of the back wheel, and two less chainrings up front. The perfectly straight chainline made his bike SILENT when he rode it - no grinding chain on the front derailleur, no kinking noises from the chain being majorly diagonal in the rear (smallest up front to the smallest in the rear, or largest up front to the largest in the rear is a bad move and will wear out your parts).

    NO CHAIN SLAP: When you go off a curb on a "normal" bicycle. The chain will SLAP the frame and eventually eat right through it. (Most bicycles have a "chain-stay guard" sticker there to minimize the damage) Not to mention the loud "SLAP" sound it makes as it tears into the metal there. This happens because the chain is held tight by the spring of the rear derailleur. Even the tightest springs won't stop this slapping. An SS rig has a more permanent chain tensioning system, where the chain can NEVER become loose enough to come in contact with any part of the frame.

    His bike was LIGHT too. All that extra stuff for changing gears weighs a lot. Around three to five pounds.

    Getting rid of all that stuff not only makes your bike lighter, but more efficient. All the extra length of chain and derailleur cogs suck up the power transferred from your legs. You don't realize how much, until feel the "turbo" of a true single speed. (Not shifting your geared bike is NOT the same!)

    Nothing to go wrong, almost no maintenance, a SILENT drive-train, a much lighter ride (really helps going up hills, and carrying up stairs), a very "clean" look - less cables and cogs and derailleurs, EXTREMELY efficient power transfer to the rear wheel, no gear slippage (which has caused me much anguish and agony, and even a foot slipping off the pedal and injuring my leg on something sharp, or my crotch slamming onto the top tube - even properly adjusted to the maximum cannot totally prevent this slippage phenomenon), and kicking everyone's ass on rides are the main benefits of the SS lifestyle.

    Having no shifters on the handlebars seriously frees your mind. I never realized how much my brain would worry about what gear I was in, is my chainline straight, better downshift before this hill, etc. Now, I just enjoy the ride and pedal. It's a completely different experience.

    I have a geared bike, but I feel like it's only useful to try out different gear combinations or for pulling a heavy trailer. It sees almost no love from me.

    Geared rear wheels are "dished" or built with an offset to fit all those cogs in the rear which is much weaker than a single speed wheel that is built with NO DISH.
    Last edited by danthesoundman; 12-28-2013 at 06:12 AM.

  56. #356
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    Well i actually want to get into dirt jumping and urban freeride. I'm looking into the giant stp but still can't decide whether i want SS or geared.

  57. #357
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    Why Singlespeed?

    -cheap
    -reliable
    -low maintenance
    -weird
    -great training
    -better roll-backs (I used to ride flatland bmx.....)
    -fun
    -better looking

    One day in my dad's high school math class, some girl asked the teacher, "Why do we have to learn this?" The teacher got really excited, and said "Who cares, we're having fun, aren't we?!"



    there she is: I got the frame, fork, and headset in 8th grade at a garage sale for $3.... full chromoly, came with a bio-pace crank then, it is the General Moonshadow. Now over ten years after I got it, its going up 2,500 vert up passes in the winter, riding steep CO singletrack, etc..... Mavic 217/XTR rear hub, XT v-brakes, Avid levers, WTB saddle, LX cranks, Race Face 32t chainring

  58. #358
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    I thought single speed was mainly for jump bikes like specialized p1

  59. #359
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    #1 you learn so much about flow and technique. you draw beautiful lines because you have to. you learn to use pulses of energy to handle tough sections. You can't just continuously slam into things and plow over them.

    #2 if you ride a geared bike, you'll become a MUCH better and faster rider. I bought a SS as a back up bike and wanted to try it. It be came my favorite bike especially when my FS frame broke. when I build up a new FS, I felt much more confident and tuned in

    # the feeling, the feeling, the feeling....

  60. #360
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    If you like attention it's alway fun showing up for group rides and having your single get all the action while the other over priced geared bikes don't get the time of day. It's even better when you ride away from them while there trying to get in the right gear. Happy trails

  61. #361
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    Sissy. Wuss. Pansy. Miss. Ma'am. Sally.

    This is the best post ive ever seen.

    I have a SingleSpeed since I live in Rhode Island, every hill out here can be climbed on it if you man-up a bit. The rolling hills are perfectly suited to a certain gear ratio, and I found that on my other bike, a 1x9 ellsworth Truth, I was just not shifting much. So I went to a hardtail SS, it gives me a killer workout, is super light, I actually think I am faster in some areas with it, and it is bulletproof.

    I think if you try it you will have fun, but if you only have time/$ for one bike, keep the gears.

    If you want to separate the SS men from the boys, ask what gear ratio they are running. Try hopping on a 32-16 geared bike and getting up the hills. If you aren't He-Man in 2 months of riding, you can have your money back. Then get back on the gears and torture your palls.

  62. #362
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    I was having a conversation with my neighbors (husband and wife) the other day. He asked me, "Why do you ride your singlespeed when you have your SantaCruz hangin in the garage?" I was getting ready to answer when his wife came up with the ultimate answer for me. She said, "Because he can!"

    I loved it!

  63. #363
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    alternate response

    "You have the case wrong. The Santa Cruz is hanging up because I ride my singlespeed."
    raise the prayer flags of the temple of one gear.

    slowvelo

  64. #364
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    Why single speed? I started riding a KHS Solo-one to commute to work when I lived in the flat lands, I put a Rock-Shox Pilot w/comp & rebound to "plush the ride", and it was a great compliment to my regular off road riding. I then built another SS with an eccentric b.b. in case I wanted a geared hardtail, but haven't taken it apart, because I found that it helps my overall riding. I now live in Big Bear and I still ride my SS as much as my FS trail bike, and we only have hills or at least it seems that way. My off road SS has front suspension and hydraulic discs so it doesn't break any weight records at approx. 25lbs, but compared to 30ish, it feels light to me. And for the "motorcycle" bicycle riders, I also ride DH when I'm lazy and want to ride the lift, however in Big Bear we don't have DH like some places so I call it extreme cross country and DH riding also helps my overall riding ability. My passion is riding mountain bikes and it's pretty much all I do, and I don't care what you ride or what the price as long as WE ALL RIDE BIKES AND STICK TOGETHER. My next SS goal is to Single Speed the Slick Rock, any takers? thanks for reading and RIDE ON.

  65. #365
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    Don't waste your time with this troll!

    Quote Originally Posted by kawboy8
    Single speeds are dumb. I had a single speed when I was 4. Someone said, "because their the new thing...mainstream". How dumb. Because everyone else is doing it...lets all run out and buy a bike that technology has left behind.
    Do not listen to this imbecile.
    That being said... The reason I ride a couple of (converted) singlespeed bikes is the simplicity and the allure of "oneness" if you will, with the bike. I love their clean looks, quietness, and even my converted ones with vertical dropouts have no tensioners of half links with a 2:1 ratio(lucky me) with a QR! They have their place and should be , in my view, as simple as they can be-that means no suspension, no disc brakes, steel, (although I have an aluminum Manitou Hardtail SS and in the process of converting an old carbon Trek Y SL200 to SS--URTs designs make great SS!!!! )But I also ride a full sus 5in travel, 27 gear trail bike, a geared racing hardtail and a geared road bike. I guess to love bikes means love all, ride all, and enjoy it all!! Let's hoist a cold one and celebrate bikes!

  66. #366
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    I think you said it best

    You said it in one of your post "I ride for the fun of it all". That's the real reason to build a single. You can convert an old bike into a single for just a couple hundred dollars to see if you like it or not. I can't spoke for the others but I would be willing to dig in the parts bin and see what I can come up with to send to you to help out the cause.

    Kirby

  67. #367
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    Great to see so many SS riders, I have only just converted my Softail (16 years old this year) to SS. I am having some teething troubles, but the smile on my face of hitting my favourite hills last weekend wont diminish till until I get back on that bike. The drive on the uphill was amazing, no out of breath experience of driving with the heart, only the warm glow of my legs at the top and momentum over the top to hit the next downhill section.
    Its funny that the bike that I used to cop a ribbing over for its strange frame is now seen as old school and now gets even stranger looks for its drivechain. After the conversion was complete I looked at the old parts that came off with wonder and shock that they lasted that long. That bike has close to 7000km's on it and I'm more happy with it now than I have ever been. The local bikeshop needs big thanks for sparking my interest in SS and may be shocked when I cancel my layby on a Mongoose All Mountain to anouther 5" travel bike and do a superlite SS conversion on that.

  68. #368
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    It really comes down to function and simplicity. If you ride year round every night on very muddy trails like we do here in Portland. You just can't keep a geared bike with suspension working, the time you would have to spend cleaning and maintaining a more complex bike would be more than your time spent actually riding. Just spray it off lube the chain ride and repeat...it's a beautiful thing.
    XC-EXPERT/PRO
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  69. #369
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    "Geared" SS?

    Quote Originally Posted by Design2Ride
    Just spray it off lube the chain ride and repeat...it's a beautiful thing.
    Amen, brother. One of the many reasons I love my SS Karate Monkey... But there are a few trails in my neck of the woods that compel me on occasion to break out my geared Niner rigid (especially during Winter and for foul-weather rides)... Afterwards I spend more time than I care to admit cleaning derailleurs. So... for my next experiment, I'm lacing up an Alfine 8 speed internal-geared hub (with disc). A 5-10 minute rear wheel swap on my Karate Monkey, using the same chain, a few zip ties for the cables, and a slip-on gripshifter/Ergon combo should give me a weatherproof hill-climber with the benefits of a SS chain setup, but with greater pedalling range...

    The Alfines are not the easiest to find (particularly in black 36-hole), so I'll keep searching...

    Peace,
    BB

  70. #370
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    I've been a devoted SS rider for a few years now. All I gotta say is that my quads are shredded from riding SS everyday and it's a lot easier to climb mountains on my geared rigs now. The simplicity and durability of the drivetrain makes it an appealing option for commuting and urban ride, for sure. I wouldn't want to be bashing my Raceface Atlas cranks and X9 der when I don't hit my urban lines just right.
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  71. #371
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    SS is fun. If you dont like it then dont ride it. We dont go into other forums and preach about how stupid gears are.

    SS makes you honest. you either got it or you don't.
    Prison is hard, everything else is easy

  72. #372
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    Because you can be like this guy...

    ...and have great stories to tell about racing a rigid single speed in some of the top solo and team mountain bike stage and endurance events in the world:

    http://www.bikerumor.com/2009/03/13/...tain-bike-mag/

  73. #373
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    'cause all those parts in the shop are of more use when they're built up into a bike...

  74. #374
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    Dang it! I hate this thread! I'm in the middle of building a bike, trying to get back into mountain biking and now I wish I was building a SS! Why couldn't I have read this before I started! The pure passion that yall display is amazing. If I get back into biking I WILL build myself a SS.

  75. #375
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    hi guys Im thops from philippines. I just want to share some of my SS experience

    I joined my 2nd race this summer. its NOT an SS category race os I'm up against geard bikes.


    this is me on my SS


    oh no man in spandex


    pedal d@m it


    3rd placer whoohoo

  76. #376
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    single speed

    i ride a geared turner 5spot which i love , but i also picked up a new ss misfit 29er frame that i built up and enjoy riding, ss is fun to tear ass around, and keeps you in shape on the climbs i would recomend at least giving it a try, if you want to purchase a ss frame make sure you get one that can be geared just in case you dont like it

  77. #377
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    I just SSed my 2008 Stinky. Best decision of my life.

  78. #378
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    Hope Trust issues

    I can see the appeal of a single speed, but myself I can never do it again. On a few occasions when standing to pedal real hard on my mountain bike, the chain has come off, but the other gears grabbed it and just saved me. I remember when I was younger and got carried away on bmx bikes, nothing sucks more than giving her **** and the chain comes off. It in fact almost killed me! I was on the last couple of power strokes before jumping a curb at high speed. The chain let go right before the curb. I nailed the curb, barely managed to stay on the bike, with my hamstring across the top tube trying to get it under control. Across the grass between the sidewalk and road, just missed a phone pole, over the curb, out onto the road, and just managed to bring it back to the side of the road before the car coming up behind me smoked me. Too close. Never again. That wasn't the first time the chain come off, but I made it my last(hopefully), gears have saved me so far......and speaking of balls with gears, ever have the chain come off and you land directly on a gooseneck? Try that one and tell me how you like the single speed. I am thinking of converting to a 9 speed though. With those other 2 front gears still in place, i'll have more peace of mind.

  79. #379
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    Because the guys at my bike shop are tired of fixing bent teeth on my chainrings. And because I need a good reason to get a tattoo.

  80. #380
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    been a while

    Six months ago I converted my old Softial to S/S and it gave up the ghost about a month after that. Since then my alloy and cheap Avanti has become my S/S bike and when it is dry the All Mountain gets a thrashing, but what a joy to constantly develop the S/S to my needs. Gone are the shocks up front (now 80mm offset rigids) and with a quality wheelset, Truvitav cranks and Crank brothers pedals i'm set. the weather here in Australia has been pretty wet of late so some of the local hills are hurting.
    And the best thing is that I am racing it now (in a pretty crap grade but I'm out there).

  81. #381
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    I've been riding a SS since 2003 and I think it's better than having gears. IMO I feel that SS is best on any terrain except certain trails that have really steep climbs that are almost impossible to climb on a SS. When I ride with one of my boys that has gears, I smoke him on the uphills, but he catches me sometimes on a straight-away or downhills. I love my SS. Although, sometimes I feel that having maybe three gears in the rear would be kind of fresh. A three speed bike.

  82. #382
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    Singlespeeds are jst limiting your options, if you can have at least a few gears why wouldnt you. i have 7 speeds, my legs are very strong and i almost never shift out of high gear even for uphills so basically i ride SS, but in the event that im super tired from intense riding, itz very nice to be able to use a lower gear if need be so i can actually get back home. I dont however think a bike needs a million and one different speeds, that will only keep you from gaining real leg strength. Ride around in a tough gear only, for a couple weeks, and see how powerful you start becoming, and how incredibly easy riding uphill or on anything becomes, compared to when you were switching gears constantly to make it easy on yourself. Of course this iz up to your health and abilitites, some people need many speeds.

  83. #383
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    Quote Originally Posted by HardcoreHardtail
    some people need many speeds.
    some peoplez need only one

  84. #384
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    Want Replys?

    Help - speak in English! - at least for us just starting to explore single speeds!

  85. #385
    ss= 800 lb. gorilla
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    loving it

    listen, im a newbie, pretty much, 2 the mtb scene. i have a single, and a geared ride. riding a single is a blast, the simplicity of it, and having to keep up the momentum, etc. i was just thinking, riding the ss reminds me of when i first learned to drive, way back when, and i learned to drive on a chevy wagon, 3 speed standard on the column (betcha the mortgagae 99% of the readers here dont have a clue what THAT is lolol) the only point im making is the basic simplicity is what makes it so much fun, no gimmiks, no fuss, and best of all, for mechanically challenged folk like me, NO MAINTENANCE!!! ride on, bros, ride on

  86. #386
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by razin cane
    chevy wagon, 3 speed standard on the column
    Sorry, I can only relate to technical jargon like "Three-on-the-tree" (or "Fo-on-the-flo")...That wasn't a Chevy Nomad by any chance?

    Hey I'm with you, bro... simplicity brings joy... (Admittedly I have a healthy stable of bikes) but my overall favorite is my SS 29er Karate Monkey (fully rigid)...If I could keep only 1 bike it would be that one.

    Peace,
    BB

  87. #387
    ss= 800 lb. gorilla
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    montclairbobbyb

    shoot, i 4 got they called it 3 on the tree!!! cool, and i wish it was a nomad, that was one boss ride. it was just my folks old chevy station wagon, a 1970, bel air, or maybe impala? dont really remember, but thats the first car i ever drove. anyway, if i knew a year ago what i know now, i probably would of went with youre bike, the karate monkey, or maybe the gt ss peace, or the monocog from redline. with the upgrades i put on the outcast, i put an extra 3 hundred in 2 the bike, but i just started out at that point, and i didnt know if this mtb thing would last, but it is, and how!!

  88. #388
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    i'm about to convert to the tao of ss...taking in an old 1990 schwinn that weighs a ton, but is still a ball of fun to ride after having taken the front derailleur off (now its a 1x6!)...but i still use only 2 of THOSE 6, so....i figured, why haul all this extra weight around?

    hope to have it done tomorrow at my LBS.

    how much weight will i probably shave? it's an old shimano SIS...also, steel rear wheel is being replaced with aluminumb.....

  89. #389
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    Well here is my two cents. I'm an old Bmx'er who rides an FS geared bike. I used to race a BMX 24 inch cruiser class and loved it. We weren't calling them SS or anything. Mtn bikers think SS is something new. As with any bike picking the correct gears for a particular trail is very important, even more for an SS ride. If your trail is mostly uphill use a smaller front chainring and opposite for a flat trail. You'll know after the first ride whether you picked right. When the hill gets so steep or long that I cant go any further I walk it. Usually the geared boys are spinning thier brains out moving at a walkers pace anyway.(except for the trully fit riders) I've found that running an SS would allow me to snap the bike up and pedal as hard as you want instantly, while trying to do that with gears takes time and risks slipping a chain. I'm sure people will say different, but thats where most SS riders get thier advantage on tight twisty trails. If I ride long fairly straight trails with lots of elevation I'll be on the geared bike. I'll take an SS on fast, twisty, trails anyday and trails with lots of obstacles. Think of an SS as more of a cross-over trials bike with a little more gearing. Lighter, quicker, and easier to throw around. All trails are not created equal, the bikes arent either.

  90. #390
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    Smile Technology

    Quote Originally Posted by kawboy8
    Single speeds are dumb. I had a single speed when I was 4. Someone said, "because their the new thing...mainstream". How dumb. Because everyone else is doing it...lets all run out and buy a bike that technology has left behind.
    My Mooto X with Chris kings is not left behind in technology. My favorite bike is my SS! Maybe its because it reminds me of when I was 4 !

  91. #391
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomsharo
    Single speed is dumb only to those who don't want to ride better or get stronger. I built mine and use it as a training tool to teach me how to flow the trail and consintrate on my riding technique. When you ride a ss you only have to worry about how good your technique is. No shifting, sandbagging, or slamming down only to put the brakes on. You learn to us the energy you save flowing down the hill to carry you up the other side. I only stand when I absolutely have to and never for more than the last 100 yards. This forces me to work harder and be more conservative. Once I take this knowledge and combine it with my turner 5 spot with all the bells and whistles I can ride people who are 20-30 years younger than me into the ground and often do. I may be an old coot but I ride with all the 20 year olds and they don't wait for me as much as I wait for them. It also allows me to have a fun ride with my wife, ladies, kids and lesser riders while continuing to get a work out. try it you will be surprised.
    Interesting! I have a road SS Specialized Langester-- 09 bike with 4000 mi. on it. It is my favorite bike to hammer on the bike trail, and chase the geared bikes after work. It has made me a stronger rider. Many people can ride fast with gears. Not so many with one gear.
    I raced at http://www.racemtb.com/default.htm and found that the SS speed group is a very fast group of racers. Usually men who need more of a challenge on a bike. They are not slow!

  92. #392
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    You ask us why? We ask you why not?

  93. #393
    Long live long rides.
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    Going to grad school & wanted a bike i don't have to think about for 2 years.

  94. #394
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    SS is the purest feedback

    Ever since I started riding SS mid-January, I have been trying to explain to myself and geared FS riders why I am so crazy about my KM. What I have noticed is that most of the people are not so happy to hear about SS bikes. Most people love their bikes and a SS goes in the opposite direction. It's not really surprising. It's also okay. If they are happy with their bikes then it's cool.

    That being said:

    I think the biggest reason why SS is great for me is that you get an absolutely pure feedback about the trail, your condition, and your skills. Since I bought my KM, my riding hours have not varied to what I have logged in the past but, I am so much stronger that people who dropped me last year are shocked that they get blown away on the hills. I am 42 and never thought that I'd get such strength and muscular endurance gains without doing things radically different than I have. I don't need weights or more hours, just my SS and the next hill.

  95. #395
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    I stop wearing tight hot pants for riding. SS change my way of thinking.

  96. #396
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    Now that I've been riding SS for a couple of months, I figured I'd post here:

    -No more broken derailleurs.
    -Makes climbing on a geared bike seem "easy"
    -My legs and ass are f*cking gorgeous now (not that they weren't before, but, DAMN)
    Brickhouse Blog (most known unknown)

    Just Riding Along- best internet radio show on Mountain Bike Radio

  97. #397
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    I've converted all of my mountain bikes to single speeds - all with different gear ratios, and it's great!

    My motto is - if you have to change gears to get up a hill you're not trying hard enough!

  98. #398
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    You make the best decision in your life - trust me

    Why change gears if you can change bikes?
    Why get expensive 30 speed parts if you can build 1 bike?

    I only have 2 bikes. 16" and 26" but with almost same GearPerInch which is nice.

  99. #399
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    I'm sort of in the "How many damn gears do you really need?" school of biking. I started out with a 24-speed as a campus bike, and found that I really only used the middle chainring and two or three cogs out back. So when the time came for me to get a new bike (the old frame was a bit small for me) I thought I'd try a single speed because:

    1) If, for the riding I do (which may not be the same sort of riding everyone else does), I only use a few ratios, why not just pick one and learn to deal with it?

    2) I'm not competing, so I don't need to be at max speed/efficiency.

    3) I'm a fat guy, and I hate working out because it's boring. But riding bikes is fun. A single speed is sort of like forced interval training, especially when you're using the bike as a commuter on a 10-mile route with rolling hills. It forces me to develop a smooth pedal stroke, learn to stand up and sit down without skipping a beat, and (this may be imaginary) there must be some benefit to training your muscles to operate efficiently at different pedaling cadences. Maybe.

    4) Tweaking to get just the right ratio gives me an excuse to tinker with my bike ^_^

    I also built my old bike into a 1x8, and wish the frame wasn't so damn small so I could ride it more comfortably on longer rides (guess it's time to buy another frame to build). It's fun, simple, and fast. Faster than my SS since I'm not stuck with a "compromise" ratio. They're very different bikes, and each very fun in its own way.

  100. #400
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    It all started when i picked up a sun rim with a singlespeed shimano freewheel from the bargain bin in a bike shop, just for a change i put it on my 05 explosif cos the dropouts were ss ready, and i loved it that was 4 years ago and have only really ridden singlespeed since,

    saying that some theiving scumbags nicked my explosif from my drive, gutted me..
    i love the fact when i ride i dont snap chains anymore or have to deal with chain skip..
    and riding singlespeed makes you a much stronger rider!

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