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  1. #551
    Clyde on a mission!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reillyj View Post
    couldn't you not use your other gears, why do you need to buy a whole new bike to ride one ratio?
    It's kinda like mountain climbing with or without a safety line. Physically it's exactly the same, you have to make it across the same obstacles, your grip is the same, but mentally there is a HUGE difference.

    Bringing a geared bike and only using one gear means you have a "safety line". If for some reason it gets too tough you have the option to reconsider and start using the gears for an easy way out. If you only have one gear you have no alternatives and if the going gets tough, you have to toughen up too. Physically there are no difference between riding ss with a 32/16 ratio and using a geared bike in 32/16 (except for the tiny bit of added resistance of the rear derailleur), but mentally it's a whole different beast.

  2. #552
    fresh fish in stock...... SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reillyj View Post
    couldn't you not use your other gears, why do you need to buy a whole new bike to ride one ratio?
    take away the choice and you stop thinking about the choice....then start focusing on the ride.

    sit.
    stand.
    push.

    are all the options you have.
    Visit these 2 places to help advance trail access:
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  3. #553
    meow, meow.
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    Chainline does matter too. When I was trying the SS idea by always staying in 32-16 at a geared bike, it was easy (mentally, for me) not to switch gears. It was then that I realized that even 5 gears is too much. However, the chainline was off. But now on a true SS drivetrain, the chainline is perfect and it feels so, even though ring and cog are 28-14 (and thus slightly less efficient than 32-16).

  4. #554
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    There is something more direct about a single speed drive train. It is probably the chainline or it could be the larger tooth profiles on the rings and cogs. I tried riding in one gear prior to trying SS and it was not as good. I also found that I could use a taller overall gear on a true SS. Also, there is the fact that it is quieter and weighs less too.
    Full rigid SS, Hardtail SS, Hardtail Geared, Full Suspension Geared.

  5. #555
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    Oh, the quietness is something special. I'm running a True Precision Poacher hub and despite its drawbacks (mainly exposed bearings in rare sizes, and mine has one bearing bore slightly oversized due to a CNC error), don't want to go back to hubs that can be heard and hubs that don't engage as fast.

  6. #556
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    I got a single speed mountain bike because I wanted a completely different experience from riding my road bike. I wanted to explore the local parks and trails and just get dirty and eliminate the usual excuses, like extra time cleaning up afterwards. I didn't want any complexity, nothing to get in the way of me just grabbing the bike and going out to have some fun.

    At the back of my mind I was also worried that if I got another bike it could replace my current road bike. With a single speed mountain bike deciding which one to ride on a particular day is fairly straightforward; there is very little overlap. Having said that, maybe at some point I'll add a few gears just as an option, but for now I'm happy with my decision.

  7. #557
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    I like the challenge and simplicity of singlespeed. With 3 young kids and an wife I find I can go ride and not have to spend extra time fixing things.

  8. #558
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cools View Post
    I got a single speed mountain bike because I wanted a completely different experience from riding my road bike. I wanted to explore the local parks and trails and just get dirty and eliminate the usual excuses, like extra time cleaning up afterwards. I didn't want any complexity, nothing to get in the way of me just grabbing the bike and going out to have some fun.

    At the back of my mind I was also worried that if I got another bike it could replace my current road bike. With a single speed mountain bike deciding which one to ride on a particular day is fairly straightforward; there is very little overlap. Having said that, maybe at some point I'll add a few gears just as an option, but for now I'm happy with my decision.
    Hi All....My first post I joined this site after ordering a 'leftover' '12 UNIT 22. Although it's currently inbound to my LBS in Ann Arbor (WIM) Mi, I have to say I bought an SS for the EXACT same reasons. Keeping my road (Cannondale CAAD8 105) in perfect order is no biggie, but the beauty of having an SS to grab-n-go is what I really look forward to this year.

  9. #559
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    A nice side benefit of your SS is the best username on here Have fun!
    Yeah I only carry cans cause I'm a weight weenie.

  10. #560
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    The ability to grab-n-go is priceless all by itself. To improve it, I even quit lubricating chains.. and it's the best decision I made since moving to SS drivetrains.

    Chain wear rate remained the same as before, when I lubed them up as soon as I started to hear them running. I also washed them thoroughly every 3 or 4 lube-ups. It was such a waste of time and it kept me stressed to remember to do that. And finally it's no more!

    Another good thing is that they don't squeak nearly as much as I expected them to. They don't take the quietness out of the ride, in my experience (whereas a good pawl-style hub can ruin it entirely). And there's no more of that gunk that accumulates on drivetrain parts even with dry style lubes! Whenever I get a chain really dusty, I just wash it with water..

    Overall, it's a win-win-win for me.
    Last edited by J. Random Psycho; 03-13-2013 at 04:23 PM.

  11. #561
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    Building SS fat bike from old 2001 trek. Sure I will have plenty of questions and such to come.

  12. #562
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    Quote Originally Posted by J. Random Psycho View Post
    The ability to grab-n-go is priceless all by itself. To improve it, I even quit lubricating chains.. and it's the best decision I made since moving to SS drivetrains.

    Chain wear rate remained the same as before, when I lubed them up as soon as I started to hear them running. I also washed them thoroughly every 3 or 4 lube-ups. It was such a waste of time and it kept me stressed to remember to do that. And finally it's no more!

    Another good thing is that they don't squeak nearly as much as I expected them to. They don't take the quietness out of the ride, in my experience (whereas a good pawl-style hub can ruin it entirely). And there's no more of that gunk that accumulates on drivetrain parts even with dry style lubes! Whenever I get a chain really dusty, I just wash it with water..

    Overall, it's a win-win-win for me.
    I use a product called GIBBS (not in stores) on my road bike chain, mechs and grip shifters (Smith and Wessons too) ...... due to it's ability to penetrate INTO the metal, and still plan to keep lubing my 22" Rigid Unit when the time calls for it.
    2012 KONA UNIT, 22"
    2010 Cannondale CAAD8 105 Cyclocross, 61cm
    1972 Schwinn Manta Ray (original owner!)

  13. #563
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    I am an aggressive rider and my rigid SS (made by a BMX company) feels like a big BMX bike that I can go for long rides on. My girlfriend is one season new to MTBing. I started her on a rigid SS. It took her longer to really (truly) start enjoying mountain biking because of this, but now the she does, she is a stronger, more agile rider who is not thirsty for upgrades.

  14. #564
    Is now still the time?
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    It's been said already. SS can be quieter, depending; even silent. Wildlife sightings are on a better potential. I reeled in a guy on a long hard climb and passed him quickly. He didn't hear me coming. Except for salutations, he didn't hear me go either.
    SOrCerer

  15. #565
    MMS
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    SS is more about me, than the equipment. Equipment is cool, bling is nice, etc. etc., but at the end of the day on my SS..."I" did it. I like that.
    I'm having more FUN than anybody!

  16. #566
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    so you really don't need to lube chains on SS? Just took mine off and lubed it. With a dry lube. Maybe I'll let all that get worn off, and just let it go. Washing occasionally.

    Reason I pulled it was because it was getting crunchy. Had some mud get in the drivetrain and was worried about premature wear. Guess a quick scrub would have done just as well?
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

  17. #567
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    Well I still don't lubricate, and try to run them clean. ) When a chain becomes crunchy from mud or dust, I take it off and wash with water. Would have pressure washed if I had the device.

    In the winter, with all those road salts, plain water seems to be insufficient and I boil the chain with some washing machine detergent. A stainless chain works better for this.

    But SS-specific chains, unlike 8-speed ones, don't seem to be expected by designers to run dry. They have tighter tolerances between side plates and may attempt to bind at some links. I just flex those links forcibly to loosen them. This is bearable with KMC Z610HX and non-detectable with KMC X1 (I even run it on 24-20 Hammerschmidt gear without any issues).

    The one chain that I failed to run dry, while maintaining remnants of sanity, is Wippermann 7R8. It binds fiercely when dry, and emits a lot of screeching.

    If I could not get Z610HX to run freely, I'd just use SRAM PC-890. Expected good life from KMC X1, but it's on par with everything else, 6 months, either lubed/maintained or dry/clean.


    (And my chainline is 50 mm on 2 bikes, to about 0.2 mm measurement error, both ends, which I measured many times over.)

  18. #568
    Portable Audio Nerd,...
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    I'll be joining the SS Club in a few days. I just ordered my first, a Gravity G29,...I'm expecting simplicity & stress relief. I just started really riding bikes again last year, and my geared bikes are a friggin' PITA!!! I sold a folder, I have a Puma Nevis 8 speed (the most reliable), and a Lombardo Power2000 21 speed that has been a headache from day 1!!! And I first purchased a comfort bike (what a stupid mistake!!!), a schwinn voyageur ig3. Even THAT was annoying. You need to stop pedaling to shift,...not for meh!!!

    Anyways, I'm awaiting my new G29, and I'm expecting to finally ride & ENJOY myself.

  19. #569
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    Would anyone agree that falling isnt such a bad thing on a singlespeed?

    When you have a rear mech and about to fall the only thing I can think about is "nooooooooooo my derailuer hanger ****!!!".

    I really want to try a ss and the fact that I can moderatly wipe out and not worry about somthing like that makes it more feasible to any disadvantage of not being able to shift.

  20. #570
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    I have broken a derailleur hanger just by riding and getting a stick caught in the spokes and had to walk out. It wasn't long after that, I started to SS almost exclusively. When I am falling, I generally think about body parts, not the bike.
    Full rigid SS, Hardtail SS, Hardtail Geared, Full Suspension Geared.

  21. #571
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    I've noticed a significant difference in the drag if the chain is not lubed. That's with my road commuter SS Band wagon.

    I wash my bikes maybe once in 1-2 months. I lube them also and check the pressure. Of course I do those if needed.

    This morning I just sprayed lube on Band wagon chain and get going to work. Major difference.
    "The most interesting things in life are always beyond the reach of leash."

  22. #572
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    Quote Originally Posted by tds101 View Post
    ...Even THAT was annoying. You need to stop pedaling to shift,...not for meh!!!
    Yep what's wrong there is the stopping and the shifting.

    toot334455:
    I really want to try a ss and the fact that I can moderatly wipe out and not worry about somthing like that makes it more feasible to any disadvantage of not being able to shift.
    Not being able to shift is an advantage.
    "The most interesting things in life are always beyond the reach of leash."

  23. #573
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    Update: non-lubricated KMC Z610 HX still doesn't run as easily as a non-lubricated 8-speed chain.

  24. #574
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    I built my first SS ten years ago and I still can't give a coherent answer as to why I ride them. Just to be fair I will occasionally ride a buddy's high zoot $xxxx.xx dollar FS rig and my little inner voice just says "uh......no".
    It's all about the mo.

  25. #575
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    Interesting to revisit this thread.

    Since I was here last I went from SS to an Alfine 8, thinking that such a heavy, versatile bike (Surly Ogre) is wasted on a single ratio. Now I'm going back to SS!

    Having gears is convenient, I guess, but the more I rode the more I just sat at about seventy gear inches and mashed up hills.

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