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  1. #276
    meh... whatever
    Reputation: monogod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver
    BMX freewheels and cogs are built to take abuse and in some areas, easier to acquire than the pricier ss specific components.
    my point about ss parts being able to take the abuse was not that bmx part couldnt take it, but rather that there is no strength deficit in using ss parts or strength benefit in using bmx parts, which is what i gathered the question was basically about.

    as for being easy to acquire, i believe ups delivers worldwide...

    They're pretty much the same thing except they cost more when you say their ss parts.
    ive personally never witnessed "ss price gouging" on speedgoat, pricepoint, bikeman, jensenusa, cambriabike, et al, or LBS. not saying its never happened, just saying ive never seen it.

    I'm not saying that Surly doesn't make some great bikes and parts and when you compare their prices to others, they look downright thrifty.
    unless its chris king stuff, surly is on par with most everyone else. as far as going with bmx freewheels... unless you buy a GOOD bmx freewheel ($75.00 eno) it comes apart rather quickly. i can explode an acs freewheel in less than a month, and destroy a pyramid in less than a week. but even so cogs & freewheels are similarly priced with an acs freewheel being about 20 bucks, cnc surly cog just a few buckaroos more.

    same with alloy chainrings, whether bmx or mountain. unless i use good stainless chainrings i can plan on replacing them regularly and often.

    therefore it comes down to simple economics... buy good parts less frequently and have the piece of mind about reliability on the trail, or spend more in the long run buying inferior throw away products.

    oh, another thing is that bmx chainrings are rather hard to come buy in lower tooth configurations (30-34) and most times MUST be used with bmx specific cranks. additionally, bmx hubs are 110 width rather than 135 and therefore cant be used on any 26" application other than the older redline monocogs.

    so when building a good wheelset from ground up its far better to go the ss hub/cog route rather than a spin on bmx type freewheel route unless you rarely (if ever) change your gearing. if you have your gearing dialed in and dont need to change very often then go for a paul, phil, or eno hub with an eno freewheel and you have a hub/freewheel combo that will outlast the bike. plus eno freewheels are rebuildable AND serviceable unlike most bmx freewheels.

    lastly, its easier to change ratios with an ss specific hub or converted geared hub/spacer/cog setup, and MUCH less expensive to have gearing options around. compare the price of a surly cog with an eno freewheel and you can get 3 or 4 cogs for the price of a single eno... not to mention a few cogs are easy to throw in the toolbox whereas a few enos take up some space and mass.

    plus, the price of a convert kit to mod a geared wheel to ss is much cheaper than building a ss specific wheelset. i personally prefer king ss hubs because of their strength, reliability, engagement point ratio, and cuz they just plain sexy bling bling! hadleys are nice too (and similar in number of engagement points to the king, but dont come in colors) as are american classic, dt swiss, etc are all much more affordable than the king.

    but i bloviate...

    basically when answering an ss newbie/prospect on whether or not to seek out and use bmx parts i would always tend to recommend just going ss specific rather than trying to locate and cobble together bmx parts. if one has old bmx parts laying around then obviously they could be used, but then again if one already had extensive bike wrenching expertise they wouldnt be asking the question to begin with anyway...
    Last edited by monogod; 03-14-2007 at 09:50 AM.
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  2. #277
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    Single Speeds rule! You'll sell your geared.
    [SIZE="2"]mtb29er.com Trying to be the best 29er site![/SIZE]

  3. #278
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    Why I Single Speed

    I rode a geared bike for years. I upgraded until I was on a $2,300 FS bike. I have traditionally been toward the back of the pack when riding. When I got the single speed (29er, full-rigid), I shot to near the front on every ride. Why is that? I think there are a few reasons. Mainly, I find that standing and pedalling allows me to use my upper-body strength. I''m fairly muscular, but that upper-body power seemed useless in the 'sit-and-spin' world of geared mountain biking. It was all cardio. I would gas, fall behind, no matter how hard I tried. My muscles in the arms back and chest were just dead weight to carry. But with a single speed I find that I'm pulling up on the bars with my arms and shoulders while pushing down on the pedals with my quads. I'm strong. That works. I turn a slower gear on hills, but I power up them. Maybe I'm an atypical case, but I felt like, "this single speed thing is a dirty little secret! It's acutally EASIER than riding gears!"

    All along I thought if I struggled with gears I would certainly bonk with only one gear. Not true. And the drive train is more efficient as everything lines up and there is no lateral loss of energy. Standing is easier, and I do so about 80% of the ride.

    Besides all that, there is an undeniably different feel and quality to the rides. Yes, it's true that the thinking/planning/executing invovled in shifting gears is a mental drain. And not having that drain frees up the mind for other planning tasks: keeping momentum, finding a clean line, etc.

    It is erroneous, in my experience, to think that single speeding is categorically more difficult than geared riding.

    Give it a try and see how it feels.

  4. #279
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    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    and the shoes
    and the shorts
    and the brakes
    and the camelbak
    and the other riders laughing at me as they pass going up hill...

    I am sure it's probably fun. Just don't know if it is worth it to me or not. Although having a 20lb bike would be cool.
    Ok, check it out:

    You will be a faster climber (eventually) once you get the gear that works for you and make it harder.

    You will bash fewer parts (lack of Der. cassette, shifters, fewer chain rings).

    You may not be as fast on the flats but who cares you can now climb like a mule!

    It's just plain fun in a very simple bike setup.

    If you have a bike you can convert by all means try it. You really aren't out that much $ (singulator, spacers etc.) if you don't like it and it is nothing to convert back. Just trust me end every other single speeder, its worth a try.

  5. #280
    Wheel Doctor
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    Simple, reliable and bulletproof.

  6. #281
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    A friend and I convinced each other to convert a bike and give it a shot. Two years later and I no longer have a geared mountain bike. I thought mountain biking was addictive enough and now I have to deal with this.

  7. #282
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    Have grown so tired of seeing "new" bikes in the $2000.00 plus range on every page of any bike mag. Real bikes - real people. give me an ss showing trail scars, and I'm happy on any trail. Doesn't matter if its made from your old wheels or a second morgage is used in buying it...just use it and enjoy! Don't worry about the paint job!

  8. #283
    awesome
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    It's a virtuous cycle!

    Riding single speed you get fitter and stronger, because you can't down shift while climbing, you learn how to use your whole body, you get faster because you learn to conserve speed and use the breaks as least as possible, plus you get the bonus of a light bike without spending a fortune.

    In short your riding skills improve and you have more fun riding (and feel better about yourself).

    That's why I do it.
    Last edited by dblspeed; 04-15-2007 at 06:26 AM.

  9. #284
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    who singlespeeds

    i figured it out the other day. i am the type of person who goes up the stairs, two (or more) at a time. going up one at a time (much like granny gearing) uses less energy, but who has the patience for that. bounding up them is what i do. so what if i'm panting at the top, i'm up there before a step at a time guy.

  10. #285
    can't get here by wishin
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    how much does it cost... on average... to convert to a ss?

  11. #286
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    Gliding and singlespeeding

    In a time when complexity and sophistication are synonymous with progress, uncomplicated things that work well take on particular elegance in the minds of some. So it is with Singlespeeding. It refutes the axiom: "You get what you pay for." Singlespeed bikes have less parts, and entire regions of maintenance and the anxiety associated with breakage are eliminated. It's Occam's razor applied to mountain biking.

    But what's it like to ride a singlespeed mountain bike, and how is it different from riding a geared one? I've never flown airplanes, but maybe it's similar to gliders and engine-driven aircraft. One has more parts, climbs faster, and doesn't have to work so closely with the surrounding conditions: it uses the technology to overcome the envronment. The other has fewer parts, and performance becomes a function of the conditions and the particular approach used by the pilot. One uses engine power and multiple systems to ensure success; the other uses momentum and conservation of energy. One makes noise, and you can almost hear the hours of engineering and design meetings behind it; the other is less noisy and more at peace with what it can and cannot do. One can sometimes be more about the destination; the other is more about the journey.

    I don't mean to sound like a wine snob about it, but there's just something less 'pharmaceutical' about singlespeeding. In my hopelessly idealistic mind, it's anti big corporation. I read where someone likened it to "sticking it to the man". I like that.

    It might be argued with equal passion that riding gears is actually more challenging. There's a certain kind of brute force necessary to muscle a geared, suspension bike up a hill--the payoff being exhilarating descents pedalling with full force, while I trail behind on my singlespeed, trying to be as aerodynamic as possible to maintain my momentum. Or the fully suspended rider screaming over rock gardens like a freight train, while I carefully weave my full-rigid single speed 29er between rocks and obstacles, looking for any scrap of a line that I can cling to.

    Gears versus singlespeed riding: separate but equal in my mind.

  12. #287
    Wheel Doctor
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor61

    Gears versus singlespeed riding: separate but equal in my mind.
    Good attitude. Since I am not a venue snob I feel the same way. My current SS is a 99' Raleigh M20 (steel and the cheapest they made) with an older Manitou fork. I made it out odd spare parts. I may look into a nice 29er. I also ride a SS/Fixie IRO Mark V. Same as ridin' it, as the SS MTB....gotta power up the hills, was tough for me to get used to since I was trained to spin 100+ in my road racing/crit years. Thankfully I still have good knees at 57.

  13. #288
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    A new Single Speed rider

    Quote Originally Posted by endure26
    Because singlespeed is now mainstream. Everybody's doing it. Make sure you pick up a fixie too. Oh...and make sure they're pink.

    When you're done, make sure you come back and tell us all about how you converted your this and that hardtail and it was a religious experience - or post pics of yet another BASS/DISS/PUSS or 1x1.

    Me? I'm saving for the recumbent.
    Very funny post!

    Funny you should mention recumbents. I really ride a very fast one out on the roads. Trouble is most road riders at least where I live hate them. Please save your money and ride a SS bike.
    I have done sub 10 double century road rides on a high end "bent but am out of that sort of thing now. I converted an old Specialized Rockhooper frameset laying in my basement to a Single speed. The only part that worked was the crank. I put on a Salsa 36 tooth in front and an 18 tooth in back and built a set of wheels for next to nothing. The rear has a bolt on Surly deal. Works great. I have been off of Mountain bikes for at least 5 years but now I ride that SS at least twice a week. Yes I am embarrassed to confess I still ride around on the road on that recumbent.
    I Highly recommend against such a bike but if you must get one keep in mind that all distance and speed records are set on them! Please save your money for a single speed or fixed gear traditional diamond framed "real" bicycle.
    I guess my first post here is answering a troll....

    TiAero

  14. #289
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    Same dammed thing you know

    I was out on the trail with my new SS convert the Rockhopper monster. It is 2 to 1 and it rocks and I put a nice set of wheels on it with a nice good rolling set of tires. And What did I encounter? The lounge Lizards in the trail parking lot with there big dollar rigs. When we hit the trail it was pretty much over after a few miles. The lizards went back to the coffee shop and the reall mountain bikers road the trail.
    Single speed bikes are not about pure speed but about pure economy and effeciecy and simplicity and just a chain to clean and not a dual rig to overhaul. That was the reason why I got out of Mountain biking. Single speed simplicty got me back in to the sport.
    I have been just about everywhere on the bicycle from Recumbents to road bikes to now SS mountain bikes.
    Simple is best. Fastest is on the road on a performance Bent.
    But speed is not everything and I am out of this type of thing also.
    The Single speed mountain bike lifestyle offers a total body workout in a short amount of time with the reward as "Homer Simpson" says learning juice (Beer) at the end of the ride...

    TiAero

  15. #290
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    Great for ADD/ADHD folks

    Steering, braking, looking ahead, controlling the bike, timing pedalling strokes, AND changing gears! God forbid you've got on-the-fly suspension modifications that are available to you. Yeesh! Talk about multi-tasking. I'm ADD and not having to think about shifting or physically conduct shifting has really allowed me to pour more of my meek concentration skills into all the other tasks. And hey, if you think you won't be able to hack it up the hills with only one gear, ride a small gear ratio. Better yet, go to the doc and get a script for speed - that should help.
    ride natty ride

  16. #291
    ravingbikefiend
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    I should add that there's a risk that after riding SS for a time you start wondering what it would be like to ride a fixed gear.

    I now have a fixed gear for the trail and a fixed gear for the road and think this is about as pure a riding experience there is...
    I ride with 65'er...he's a mountain goat....But then again, we need to throw him in the mud and pack his pockets with lead shot before a scale will read him. - Psycho Mike

    -Environmental stickers don't mean shite when they are stuck to CARS!-

  17. #292
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    I just bought a 07 Stp SS Singlespeed , and i love it , i didnt wait for the Giant Stp w/speeds cuz im to stupid to shift :P

  18. #293
    biter
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    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    I don't get it. With different cogs and gear ratios it seems like having a 21, 24, or 27 speed would be superior to a singlespeed. So what is the benefit? Is it only weight? I have a bike I could convert but I am having trouble justifying it.

    It is the weight, and removing the hassel of shifting, and hammering up hill, less stuff that can go wrong with your bike, and you can put a cool little sticker on your bike that reads "ONE FU@&ING SPEED"

  19. #294
    meh... whatever
    Reputation: monogod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver
    I should add that there's a risk that after riding SS for a time you start wondering what it would be like to ride a fixed gear.

    I now have a fixed gear for the trail and a fixed gear for the road and think this is about as pure a riding experience there is...
    werd!
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  20. #295
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    Quote Originally Posted by dblspeed
    Riding single speed you get fitter and stronger, because you can't down shift while climbing, you learn how to use your whole body, you get faster because you learn to conserve speed and use the breaks as least as possible, plus you get the bonus of a light bike without spending a fortune.

    In short your riding skills improve and you have more fun riding (and feel better about yourself).
    I'd like to argue that you can learn these things on a geared bike as well. I've been MTB riding for 6? years, and would say that I understand exactly what you're talking about. Half the time I don't downshift to climb, and I actually stand up. Actually I did that more before I learned how to shift correctly. But sometimes if I don't feel like shifting, I'll just stand up. I completely agree that the momemtum thing is key though, that took a couple of years to figure out. Maybe it's faster on an SS, I don't know

    Quote Originally Posted by neanderthaler
    i figured it out the other day. i am the type of person who goes up the stairs, two (or more) at a time. going up one at a time (much like granny gearing) uses less energy, but who has the patience for that. bounding up them is what i do. so what if i'm panting at the top, i'm up there before a step at a time guy
    I'm with you on that, I'm a double step guy too. I stopped my front DR from moving to the small chainring position, because the grannies just make my rear wheel spin.

    What really makes me consider the SS thing is the simplicity and not having to think about shifting, what's rubbing, why I'm ghost shifting, etc.

  21. #296
    singlespeedAdam
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    i have been riding single speed for 2 years now, and i love it. it saves weight, and its cheap. i do a lot of dirrt jumping, and the very worst thing to happen on the approach to a jump is for your bike to slip a gear and put your knee through the stem. with single speed, there are no mechs, and i know from when i used to ride gears, that they break the most, and cost alot too. also, single speeds do not need maintainance after every ride. once a year at the most. and after these two years of single speed, my legs are stronger than any of my geared friends. for full on mountain or XC, singlespeed is only for nutters i think, but downhill, street and dirt, its the ****
    [SIZE="3"]Cracked my head open on your kitchen floor,
    proof to you that i had brains
    [/SIZE]

  22. #297
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    for crying out loud...

    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    I don't get it. With different cogs and gear ratios it seems like having a 21, 24, or 27 speed would be superior to a singlespeed. So what is the benefit? Is it only weight? I have a bike I could convert but I am having trouble justifying it.
    I'm not quite done with my most recent SS build, but unlike a few of the other comments on here, I'll at least explain my thought behind it instead of engaging in the rather ridiculous name-calling and whatnot.

    I hate my front dérailleur. I'm not suggesting that I could personally make something better, but when XTR isn't good enough, I'll try something new. So, 1x9 it was, for a while, until out of curiosity and the availability of cheap spare parts, I converted. At the time my only bike was a FS XC rig, which I decided does better as a 1x9, but my new hardtail commuter/city bike will be SS. It has a little to do with weight savings, acceleration, etc. but more to do with simplicity.

    For lack of a better explanation, I fell in love with mountain biking because of the euphoric carefree feeling I get when I ride, whether to work or on the local trail, no matter what I ride. There is something kind of primal about SS: my energy transfered to motion, without a complicated go between, or a clunking mess of gears. So go ahead and bash me if you disagree, what you ride is a personal preference, and I found what I like. You might like it too.

  23. #298
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    Quote Originally Posted by kawboy8
    Single speeds are dumb. I had a single speed when I was 4. Someone said, "because their the new thing...mainstream". How dumb. Because everyone else is doing it...lets all run out and buy a bike that technology has left behind.
    Interesting thought: Are single speeds any dumber than combustion engines? ..... noticed the motorcycle icon...... talk about dumb. I had a motorcycle when I was 12. What are you going to ride when technology (and the incredibly poor management of natural resources, i.e. oil) leaves your loud, graceless, wasteful and toxic motorcycle behind?

  24. #299
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    Its congruent with the Compassionate Conservative Philosophy

    Give a new trail rider a bike, but a single speed. Afford him the infrastructure, but require the work of the rider.

    "What? Only one gear? How am I going to make it up these hills with but one mid-range gear?"


    [Blood]

    ...

    [Sweat]

    ...

    [Tears]


    A rider Born anew: strong and self-sufficient.

    Reflection
    A specie doesn't design itself, the environment determines the specie...unless the specie becomes conscious of the specie/environment relationship and purposely manipulates its environment in order to purposely design itself.

    SS: Embrace less, become more.

    Ironic Disclaimer: Bush proves the doctrine he purports to subscribe to by being the opposite: Given everything, he developed into nothing (don't tell me a pawn with an impressive title means sh*t).
    ride natty ride

  25. #300
    cdkrenz
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    I just bought a Bianchi SASS a few week ago and I love it. There's something to be said for simplicity. 1 gear, no suspention, just you, your bike and the trail. You won't regret having a singlespeed.

    And another thing. It's not about how fast you go. Your gal should have told you that years ago.

    -Later,
    CK

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