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  1. #1
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    White industries DOS ENO freewheel

    Anyone using white industries dos eno freewheel? Pro's/cons/glitches/ease of switching gears?

  2. #2
    Riding rigid
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    Pro
    - gives you two gear options, handy for changing the gears for riding to the trail head then to the gear used for the trail itself. Or for gearing for two different trails that have different profiles.

    Con
    - need to adjust the sliders each time or add a tensioner (to make changing easier)
    - may need to buy a new rear hub/wheel for freewheel
    - gearing is usually only 2 or 3 teeth difference on a freewheel, so if you need a wide range, a 9 spd might be better off.
    - cost as much as a 9/10 speed cassette

  3. #3
    workin' it Administrator
    Reputation: rockcrusher's Avatar
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    moved this to the singlespeed forum as the 29er forum is mostly just a bunch of new fangled part whores
    Try this: HTFU

  4. #4
    Ovaries on the Outside
    Reputation: umarth's Avatar
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    Perfect. Ignore the advice you got on the wrong forum.

    The ease of switching gears is going to depend on your bike and whether you are doing true dingle, or just in the back.

    WI makes a good product and you'll like 'em.

    Give us the scoop on your SS set up.

  5. #5
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    Surly karate monkey, niner carbon forks, Easton vice am stem, niner alloy flat bars, salsa wheelset, eiswolf wtb 2.3 tires, avid mech disc brakes

  6. #6
    SSOD
    Reputation: Crosstown Stew's Avatar
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    You should be fine running a DOS with horizontal dropouts without much of an issue. Cut your chain so the big cog is as close to the front of the drops as possible, then you should be able to switch gears by just loosing the bolts and pulling the axle back. I ran a double in the rear on a trip recently and was able to do it on the side of the trail in less than a min when I needed to.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crosstown Stew
    You should be fine running a DOS with horizontal dropouts without much of an issue. Cut your chain so the big cog is as close to the front of the drops as possible, then you should be able to switch gears by just loosing the bolts and pulling the axle back. I ran a double in the rear on a trip recently and was able to do it on the side of the trail in less than a min when I needed to.
    Less than a minute? Including the brake adjustment? That's pretty quick.

    Yes, with disc brakes you'll have to re-center the caliper. Loosen two bolts, grab the rear brake lever hard, re-tighten bolts, use adjuster knobs to get the spacing right.

    With V brakes you might luck out and if the wheel doesn't move too radically you can leave the shoes alone. Otherwise, you'll be resetting your V brakes every time you switch gears.

    Double chainrings up front matched with the DOS in the rear, say 36/17 and 34/19, is the best setup b/c it involves much less wheel movement to achieve proper tension. Vs can usually accommodate with no adjustment. Still have to adjust the caliper with discs. I think at one point I probably got it down to a couple minutes, but I'm horribly particular about my brake setup... and it was usually at a TH before the real riding started, so there was no "trailside hurry" happening.
    For me, riding bikes is not a hobby, it is a way of life.
    http://natureofmtness.blogspot.com

  8. #8
    SSOD
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    Yeah 1 min was without adjusting my calipers. I'm not that anal about my brakes and don't adjust mine when I adjust my hub. Never had any problems or noticed lack of braking, I realize you get different wear on your pads by doing this.

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the advice! Very helpful!!!

  10. #10
    Needed Less ~ Did More
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    If you are using a dingle as inteneded you shoule not have to touch the brake. The idea is to have 2 chainrings with the same tooth difference but both combos add up to the same total teeth (and near as damn it the same chain length)

    I run a 17/19 DOS with 34/36 Surly rings: 36:17 on the road, 34:19 off-road. On the CrossCheck frame I simply loosen the axle bolts, slide wheel forward 5mm, shift the chain and then moce back and tighten the bolts. I run my rear V-brake pretty close to the rim but have had zero issues.

    YMMV

    SSP
    "Put any one on one of these singlespeed bikes and they could not help but have fun"
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    Otis Guy talking about klunkers c1976

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