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  1. #1
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    Using factory made wheels on a single speed

    Folks,
    I have a Bianchi DISS from 2002 with the stock Spot hubs and WTB rims. I have seen a number of single speed bicycles sporting Mavic wheelsets. Which leads me to ask the following question:

    On my DISS, the rear wheel has no offset, as it should. However, the factory made wheels by Mavic (or other companies for that matter) are designed for 9-speed drivetrains and hence would have some offset.

    How do you deal with this offset? Does it make a difference on a single speed bicycle? And what do you do to the rear wheel to make it compatible for single speed use? Forgive my simplistic questions.

    I have been looking at a single speed disc set with Chris King hubs and Mavic 517 rims, but the set will run about $650. Given that I paid $850 for the bicycle, this would appear to be a ridiculous upgrade.

    Any insights are greatly appreciated.

    Kind regards,
    Dimitri

  2. #2
    Fat Boy Deluxe
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dimitri Nikas
    Folks,
    I have been looking at a single speed disc set with Chris King hubs and Mavic 517 rims, but the set will run about $650. Given that I paid $850 for the bicycle, this would appear to be a ridiculous upgrade.Dimitri
    While this doesn't really answer your question, $650 sounds like a lot for that wheelset. I bought mine from Paul at http://www.mtnpedaler.com and he beat that price by a considerable amount! Not to mention, he did an incredible job and was very straight forward and honest. It was a pleasure to work with him, not to mention he had pretty much everything in stock.

    I actually found 2 places cheaper than him, but one didn't have the reputation and the other was from the company actually making my frame, but they were basically going to give it to me at cost. Considering how long it's taking to get my frame, I'm 100% happy that I went with Paul.

    DT

  3. #3
    One gear to rule them all
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    The offset or dish of the wheel is center the rim in the frame. Any standard wheel wil fit in your frame. You will have to get a BMX type SS cog and some spacers to run the wheel as a SS. I think fast freddy is selling a kit. The problem you might have is the QR. The DISS has horizontal drop outs. A QR rear wheel may slip forward.






    Quote Originally Posted by Dimitri Nikas
    Folks,
    I have a Bianchi DISS from 2002 with the stock Spot hubs and WTB rims. I have seen a number of single speed bicycles sporting Mavic wheelsets. Which leads me to ask the following question:

    On my DISS, the rear wheel has no offset, as it should. However, the factory made wheels by Mavic (or other companies for that matter) are designed for 9-speed drivetrains and hence would have some offset.

    How do you deal with this offset? Does it make a difference on a single speed bicycle? And what do you do to the rear wheel to make it compatible for single speed use? Forgive my simplistic questions.

    I have been looking at a single speed disc set with Chris King hubs and Mavic 517 rims, but the set will run about $650. Given that I paid $850 for the bicycle, this would appear to be a ridiculous upgrade.

    Any insights are greatly appreciated.

    Kind regards,
    Dimitri
    Todd............. If you can't be kind, at least have the decency to be vague

  4. #4
    Retro Grouch
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    It's not an issue...

    When's the last time you heard of a mountain bike wheel failing? There really is very little difference in the longevity of a SS specific hub over a standard freehub. SS hubs have a bigger Chi Chi factor and that's it. Pay your money and make your choice; then right to hearts content.

    1G1G, Brad

  5. #5
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    No problem using std wheels

    I'm using a Mavic Crossland Disc UST wheel. Simply use spacers to position the cog in the correct position for optimal chainline. However, I believe that using a multi-speed cassette for ss use isn't optimal. I've had a few instances - especially when I was using a Crossmax (lighter weight than my Crosslands and a different cassette body) - where it felt like the pawls weren't engaging fully. I think that using the one cog on a multi-speed cassette hub puts a bit of uneven loading on the mechanism. This might not sound right because if you were in a 32/16 on a geared bike, the torque is the same as a 32/16 if that same hub was set up as a ss hub, but that's what I think. I know other people who use multi-speed cassette hubs and they report more clunking/popping sounds from the cassette. Overall, I'd say no problem. But for optimal performance, a dedicated ss hub is best. As for the wheel dish, yeah dishless is best, but like aka brad says, when was the last time you heard of a mountain bike wheel failing?
    Last edited by ssmike; 08-19-2006 at 08:12 AM.

  6. #6
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    Get any wheel set and get a cog and spacers

    That's all you need to convert any 9spd hub to ss.

    I use a SRAM 9spd hub with a Shimano BMX 18t cog and spacers, to tension the chain I use a Surly Singulator but have a Spicer Half Link on its way. Hopefully the half link will allow me to get rid of the tensioner.

  7. #7
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    Maintenance for Spot hubs?

    Folks,
    Many thanks for all the insights. But may I ask another question? What is the general opinion on the Spot brand hubs the DISS came stock with? They certainly do not spin as smooth as my Chorus hubs on the road bicycle. I have tried looking in to the Spot web site for maintenance advice but nothing comes up. Any suggestions/recommendations?

    Kind regards,
    Dimitri

  8. #8
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    Spot hubs are fine

    Your Spot hubs are good hubs. I'm sure they use sealed bearings. The reason they don't spin as freely by had is the sealed bearings have seals on both the front and back side that cause considerable drag in your hands. Campy uses loose type ball bearings that are incredibly smooth rolling. Campy's hubs always feel like silk. Both systems work great and on the bike you won't feel any difference.

  9. #9
    Suffering Mightily
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    SSmike,
    Is that the new spot spacer kit in your photo?

  10. #10
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    No, they're BMX cassette hub spacers

    Quote Originally Posted by Drbbt
    SSmike,
    Is that the new spot spacer kit in your photo?
    They are spacers from a Haro BMX cassette hub. Nice and thick. I've got a couple of 1mm fixed cup bottom bracket spacers behind the cog to really get the chainline dialed.

  11. #11
    That's gonna leave a mark
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    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    When's the last time you heard of a mountain bike wheel failing? There really is very little difference in the longevity of a SS specific hub over a standard freehub. SS hubs have a bigger Chi Chi factor and that's it. Pay your money and make your choice; then right to hearts content.

    1G1G, Brad
    One major advantage of using a SS specific wheel over a standard freehub is durability of the freehub.

    When using an individual SS cog, the amount of force from pushing a common SS gear ratio while climbing is enough to chew into the freehub. This will create enough play in the cog/freehub interface that you will eventually develop a clicking/popping sound.
    I'm not a huge gear masher but I do attempt to climb everything I come across. I ruined a freehub in less than a season of riding.

    Go with the SS specific wheel and thread the freewheel on. Every few months remove it and reinstall the same one so it doesn't get so tight you need a crowbar to change it out for a new one. Save your lunch money and pop for a White Industries ENO freewheel. It's smooth, durable, has immediate engagement, and most of all- rebuildable.

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