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  1. #1
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    Track ends and discs

    I have a bike with track ends and disc brakes, and find to be a pain to get things to line up right after working on my wheel (actually just patching a tube).

    First of all, simply removing and putting back on is a bit difficult as the disc seems to get hung up in the caliper whenever I want to move the wheel. Not sure if there's some way to make that go more smoothly.

    Then once I have it all put back together, the disc seems to be not lined up parallel with the pads. Is there any trick this, or some crucial step I am missing?

    Do you have to loosen and re-adjust your calipers every time the wheel is removed?

  2. #2
    meh... whatever
    Reputation: monogod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peepsalot
    I have a bike with track ends and disc brakes, and find to be a pain to get things to line up right after working on my wheel (actually just patching a tube).

    First of all, simply removing and putting back on is a bit difficult as the disc seems to get hung up in the caliper whenever I want to move the wheel.

    Then once I have it all put back together, the disc seems to be not lined up parallel with the pads. Is there any trick to getting discs to line up. Do you have to loosen and re-adjust your calipers every time the wheel is removed?
    back in the stone age before tubeless setups i would generally set up the caliper so the disc could slide in and out without loosening it to facilitate rapid wheel removal/install when patching/replacing a tube. on my monkey only half the pads or so made contact with the rotor, but there was still AMPLE stopping power; and i'm a big guy and ride fast. the pads would wear a little funny, but meh..... it was worth not having the hassle you described.

    the other option is to embrace 21st century technology and GO TUBELESS! then you can set up the caliper with full pad contact because you're seldom having to remove the wheel.

    ...and you get better traction.

    ...and a smoother ride.

    ...and better climbing.

    ...and don't have to worry about flats.
    "The meaning of life is to find your gift. The purpose of life is to give it away."

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by peepsalot
    ...Do you have to loosen and re-adjust your calipers every time the wheel is removed?
    Yeah, but that's one reason why I use BB7s. Can always twiddle the pad adjusters a wee bit to avoid moving the caliper if doing it trailside or in the dark.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by monogod
    tubeless jibba jabba
    The only kind of flat I have ever gotten is from thorns. I fail to see how (Tire) is more thornproof than (Tire + tube). If a thorn got through both, removing the tube would only make it easier to puncture.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by peepsalot
    The only kind of flat I have ever gotten is from thorns. I fail to see how (Tire) is more thornproof than (Tire + tube). If a thorn got through both, removing the tube would only make it easier to puncture.
    with some exceptions, tubeless is always run with a sealant inside that can seal these holes and keep going. Similar to Slime for tubes, but works much better

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike
    Yeah, but that's one reason why I use BB7s. Can always twiddle the pad adjusters a wee bit to avoid moving the caliper if doing it trailside or in the dark.
    and that why I have hydros, because if i did have to re-align the caliper it is a quick squeeze of the lever and re-tighten the bolts. Takes less than half the time as the BB7s I had. I do miss that pad adjustment though

    Also, I started using a second tensioner on the brake side and have had to fiddle with the caliper alignement much less because it makes the rotor placement and alignment consistent

  7. #7
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    I am dealing with the same situation with the Surly 1x1 I just finished building....I guess it's just something that has to be dealt with if you want to run that particular component selection. Fortunately I have never had a trail flat (knock on wood) so until I make the switch to tubeless I'm hoping my luck holds out! I think once you do it a few times it becomes quite a bit easier and quicker though..

  8. #8
    Off the back...
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    I have sliding dropouts, so no issues here...

  9. #9
    Retro Grouch
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    Quote Originally Posted by peepsalot
    I have a bike with track ends and disc brakes, and find to be a pain to get things to line up right after working on my wheel (actually just patching a tube).

    First of all, simply removing and putting back on is a bit difficult as the disc seems to get hung up in the caliper whenever I want to move the wheel. Not sure if there's some way to make that go more smoothly.

    Then once I have it all put back together, the disc seems to be not lined up parallel with the pads. Is there any trick this, or some crucial step I am missing?

    Do you have to loosen and re-adjust your calipers every time the wheel is removed?
    This is not a very elegant solution but it works very well. A rear disc brake is just plain over kill on any bike under 30 lbs. I use a old side pull cantolever on my SASS and I have no proplem skidding the rear tire under any braking conditions. (BTW I open the brake by pulling the cable out of the lever; it's very fast and easy)
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