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  1. #1
    Sofa King We Todd Did
    Reputation: SpinWheelz's Avatar
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    Track cog/lockring tool

    Maybe I'm not looking in the right place, or maybe I'm just tired of looking in general, but would someone be so kind as to point me in the direction of a tool used to remove track lockring and/or cogs? If I'm about about embark on a project, I want to make sure I have the right tools to get the job done.

    Cheers!

    P.S. Any chance that lockring tool might also be used on a older bottom bracket such as this? (Sorry it's not such a great picture - you kinda have to look through the chainring to see the bottom bracket)


  2. #2
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    I use this. Decent quality for the price. Works on my dura ace lockring.

    http://nycbikes.com/item.php?item_id=372

  3. #3
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpinWheelz
    Maybe I'm not looking in the right place, or maybe I'm just tired of looking in general, but would someone be so kind as to point me in the direction of a tool used to remove track lockring and/or cogs? If I'm about about embark on a project, I want to make sure I have the right tools to get the job done.

    Cheers!

    P.S. Any chance that lockring tool might also be used on a older bottom bracket such as this? (Sorry it's not such a great picture - you kinda have to look through the chainring to see the bottom bracket)

    I use my old-stype BB lockring tool on my lockring, it works but the smaller ones made for the track lockring work better. . As for the cog itself just get a chainwhip they're pretty standard fare, get one with 1/8" chain if you use 1/8" cogs or you might have to replace the chain.

  4. #4
    Sofa King We Todd Did
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    Cheers, fellas. But I suddenly feel like I need a Track Cogs/Lockrings 101. Based on what I've read, I gather that track cogs comes in two widths(?) - 1/8" or 3/32"? And they have to use chains of matching widths? I have a SRAM PC-1 chain that I plan on using, so that I'm guessing I'll need to find a 1/8" track cog? Are lockrings equally precise in which sorts of cogs they lock down? Are the cog/lockring tools for 1/8" cogs and 3/32" cogs different?

    What am I getting myself into here!

  5. #5

  6. #6
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    Right, the PC-1 is 1/8" so you will NEED a 1/8" cog to match. My own preference is to use the 8/9 speed 3/32" offerings. I think the provided link to Matt Chester's set up article on 63xc.com gets into this. Lockrings are standard fare, they'll lock down whatever cog you are using. Don't skimp on cogs. With both cog and lockring, you want high quality kit with accurately machined, wide threads to keep things snug. Think EAI, Shimano Dura Ace, Phil Wood. And you'll need a good chainwhip (Park!) and lock ring tool. I think I'm using the modified Hozan from Harris Cyclery. Have fun!

    What am I getting myself into here![/QUOTE]

    Hehehe...just wait...wait until the first time you get back on a bike with a freewheel and it freaks you out

  7. #7
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShivaSteve
    Right, the PC-1 is 1/8" so you will NEED a 1/8" cog to match...
    A 1/8" chain works fine on 3/32" cogs and rings. The reverse does not work well.
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  8. #8
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    It works, but you are a little more likely to derail your chain. Fine if you are freewheeling and obsess over your chain tension....But I think it is more of a problem on a fixie, especially when backpedaling under load on rough terrain, and I wouldn't do it.

  9. #9
    Look at the time!
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    for me, a chisel and a hammer has always worked best as a lockring tool....
    ok, that is probably not the nicest way to do it

    also, why spend money on a chainwhip? a few inches of leftover 1/8" chain, a 1ft steel bar and 3 bolts make a perfect chainwhip. you can always write "park tool" on it if you want
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  10. #10
    I am the owl
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShivaSteve
    It works, but you are a little more likely to derail your chain. Fine if you are freewheeling and obsess over your chain tension....But I think it is more of a problem on a fixie, especially when backpedaling under load on rough terrain, and I wouldn't do it.
    Got to disagree with that. I've been using 1/8" chains mated to 3/32" rings/cogs/freewheels for years, both fixed and free, and I've never had a problem.
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  11. #11
    'r you some kinda ssissy?
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    can you splain you tool?

    also, why spend money on a chainwhip? a few inches of leftover 1/8" chain, a 1ft steel bar and 3 bolts make a perfect chainwhip. you can always write "park tool" on it if you want [/QUOTE]

    how do you fix the chain to the bar. with the three bolts i assume, but could you splain it better. i think i'll write "var" on mine.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by riderx
    Got to disagree with that. I've been using 1/8" chains mated to 3/32" rings/cogs/freewheels for years, both fixed and free, and I've never had a problem.
    I've used both 3/32 rings and cogs with 1/8" chain on my fixie over the past couple years (thousands of miles) and never had a problem.

    As for the chain whip, if you've got some 1/8" flat bar, chain, bolts and a power drill sure you can build one.. but they are not expensive compared to the time it would take to track down the parts if you don't already have them and it's pretty easy to get one from your LBS since they are necessary for taking off cassettes.

  13. #13
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShivaSteve
    It works, but you are a little more likely to derail your chain. Fine if you are freewheeling and obsess over your chain tension....But I think it is more of a problem on a fixie, especially when backpedaling under load on rough terrain, and I wouldn't do it.
    I like using chains that are not designed to shift on rings/cogs that are designed not to shift.
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  14. #14
    Complete Bastard
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    Just in case nobody has pointed it out. The lockring is threaded backward. Might make it hard to unscrew if you use the righty-tighty lefty-loosey method.

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