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  1. #1
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    Thinking of going single speed for next bike, or two speed really.

    I was thinking of getting a mountain bike. I need a sturdy frame and low gears/a low gear for hauling stuff, heavy stuff on a trailer, and I need a higher gear for when I can go fast. And the roads I run on would be better dealt with using a suspension fork. Roads aren't always what you'd really call roads.

    At first I was thinking that an IGH would be great, because I f-ing hate rear derailleurs, but the efficiency problem and the cost, the COST!, of a Rohloff is painful to think about.

    So, now I'm thinking, you know, what if I just went single speed. I mean, really, all these gears are a pain in the ass. The cost, the bent hangers etc.

    But is it the sane thing to do? I mean, if I have a 36 up front and in the rear a 36 or 32 or whatever cog and the 15 or 17 whatever cog, one of those on each side and maybe carry some bigger and smaller cogs with me just in case, wouldn't that be enough?

    Is this the sane solution to the problem of pain in the ass shifting? For a utility/off road bike?

    I just keep thinking about how clean the bike would look. Hmmm.

    What say you?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    But is it the sane thing to do? I mean, if I have a 36 up front and in the rear a 36 or 32 or whatever cog and the 15 or 17 whatever cog, one of those on each side and maybe carry some bigger and smaller cogs with me just in case, wouldn't that be enough?

    Is this the sane solution to the problem of pain in the ass shifting? For a utility/off road bike?
    Honestly this sounds a little nuts. I think you would be spending too much time switching cogs out there on the run to suit your immediate need. This is also a bit against the idea of SS, which is basically shut up and pedal damnit. In addition, you need a chain tensioner to take up the slack in the chain when you switch cogs or a chain breaker and extra links. I guess you could always use a 9 speed chain and use multiple break away links. The chain tensioner could always get bent too like a RD. One idea I've been considering is have a triple up front with an FD and a single cog in the back with a tensioner. I'm considering this for an old suntour component ride to keep it going and simplify. IDK about sane, but SSers generally are a little off kilter. I'd say find a happy gear for hauling up hills, don't be too concerned about speed or acceleration, and coast on the downhill. If you are not hauling and out for a ride then switch up the gearing to go faster.

    Just noticed you posted something about on either side, are you thinking flip flop hub? Is there a flip flop MTB hub 135 OLD? Maybe look at cross bike with 132.5 drop out spacing instead of a mtb frame. Maybe a Surly Crosscheck or LHT would work better. Maybe a disc trucker for extra breaking power if you haul.
    No fuss with the MUSS

  3. #3
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    IMO if you are hauling heavy stuff on a trailer then you are going to want some gears.

    If you are doing "Utility" rides you aren't going to break a hanger. If you really can't stand the sight of a rear derailer then go internal.

    You're over thinking this.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    I need .....low gears/a low gear for hauling stuff, heavy stuff on a trailer, and I need a higher gear for when I can go fast.


    What say you?
    Sounds like you need gears, internal or otherwise...

  5. #5
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    You could use a dinglespeed with a converted cassette hub and a double crankset. Just google dinglespeed for how to set up your bike. This tutorial looks promising: INSTRUCTIONS: Dingle Speed

    I've used this successfully on a road bike. 1 gear for climbing/commuting/gravel rides, 1 gear for flat rides.

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