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  1. #1
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    switch to a shock?

    Just would like some opinions from some of you who race your SS. I have a Bianchi SISS with the factory rigid fork. I'm a better climber than a descender. I know it would depend on the course, but I wonder if I switched to a suspension fork if the time gained in faster descending would more than make up for the time lost on the climbs. If so, what fork should I get? $ is of course a consideration and I notice that mid-level forks with lockouts are less cash than the new stable platform types. But I can't imagine reaching down there and using a lockout on every rolling standup climb(seems like I'm out of the saddle every few seconds). There's something pure about the rigid fork but I do suffer from sore elbows sometimes. Opinions?

  2. #2
    Recovering Weight Weenie
    Reputation: Padre's Avatar
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    Bottom line.
    Fox F80X.
    Yes, you would descend faster, with more control, with less fatigue.
    The lockout thinks for you.
    There are no buttons to push, levers to pull.
    It does not bob, weave, or dance.
    DO IT.
    The best fork to happen to SS, ever.

  3. #3
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    I used both for racing, and I have to say that a rigid fork on some of the courses here in the NorthEast could very well rattle the fillings off your teeth. I've done one race once where I really lost time downhill, more than I made up uphill. Couldn't move my hands at the bottom of some downhills...

    Then, some hills are better climbed with a suspended fork.

    IMO a rigid fork is good for training and riding for fun, but racing you'll be pushing so hard that no matter what a shock up front will not slow you down.

    Again this is assuming the course is harsh. If it's smooth it's another story.

    Maurice

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maurice
    I used both for racing, and I have to say that a rigid fork on some of the courses here in the NorthEast could very well rattle the fillings off your teeth. I've done one race once where I really lost time downhill, more than I made up uphill. Couldn't move my hands at the bottom of some downhills...

    Then, some hills are better climbed with a suspended fork.

    IMO a rigid fork is good for training and riding for fun, but racing you'll be pushing so hard that no matter what a shock up front will not slow you down.

    Again this is assuming the course is harsh. If it's smooth it's another story.

    Maurice
    So are you saying that a traditional non SPV/ non lockout fork is fine for the heat of the battle? I can't afford a Fox with Terra Logic.

  5. #5
    beer *****es n' bikes
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    Quote Originally Posted by pjfinch
    So are you saying that a traditional non SPV/ non lockout fork is fine for the heat of the battle? I can't afford a Fox with Terra Logic.
    You might be able to afford my F80x:


    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...sPageName=WDVW
    bike dude, velocity employee (this is my personal account)

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