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  1. #1
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    Swapping cogs made easy

    After being introduced to a new cog technology on a previous thread, I decided to give the "quick-cog" by Lunar Bikes a chance.

    The design is very solid with high quality manufacturing. I purchased this with 2 optional cogs that attach to the base. Changing them is very easy by simply removing a securing ring. I'm impressed with this product so I figured I would share.

    I recently moved to a new area and I'm working on finding the best gear for the various rides. Also, as in most places, the terrain is vastly different from one trail to another so I can gear appropriately prior to heading to a certain location in only a minute.

    For the record: I paid, my own hard earned money, for the quick-cog and I have no affiliation with Lunar Bike whatsoever. I'm just excited about this new product and wanted to let y'all know.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Swapping cogs made easy-rsz_cog.jpg  

    Swapping cogs made easy-rsz_cog2.jpg  


  2. #2
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    Thanks for the initial review. Look forward to see some follow up after prolonged use.
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  3. #3
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    No experience with those, but I do with Gear Clamp. I find these very easy for adjusting chainline and swapping standard cogs.




  4. #4
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    I have been using g clamp as above for the last 2 months. Very easy to change gearing and achieve perfect chainline. Only need allen keys to change, no need for a chain whip.I would recommend this product.

  5. #5
    one chain loop
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    that lunar cog looks cool. is there a play between the base and cog interface?
    everything sucks but my vacuum cleaner.

  6. #6
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    Tool?

    Quote Originally Posted by sprocket47 View Post
    Changing them is very easy by simply removing a securing ring.
    Does this require a special tool or something I would ordinarily carry on my rides?

  7. #7
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    GearClamp rocks if you're using a traditional SS tensioning method (ebb, track ends...), but I've had issues when running a tensioner

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by memine View Post
    Does this require a special tool or something I would ordinarily carry on my rides?
    I looked into this a while ago and according to the site the cog can be swapped without special tools. IIRC anything pointy will do, like a knife blade, flat screwdriver or similar.

    I'm very tempted to get this Lunar cog. Mostly I just ride 34/20 and don't worry about speed, but I have the feeling I'm missing out on something and can't be arsed to buy a 19t cog and change it. The chainwhip and lockring tool are a turn-off for me, I like to avoid touching them.

    The gear clamp looks like a brilliant innovation as well.

  9. #9
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    Is it really that hard to brake out a chain whip, and switch a cog, what is it, 3 to 4 minutes tops.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneBadWagon View Post
    GearClamp rocks if you're using a traditional SS tensioning method (ebb, track ends...), but I've had issues when running a tensioner
    What kind of issues have you into? I would have been interested in trying the gearclamp out.
    Bikes, lots'o bikes

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by joshhan View Post
    What kind of issues have you into? I would have been interested in trying the gearclamp out.
    When using a sprung tensioner, I was getting abnormal skipping, seemingly because with the Gear Clamp there is no compression on the cog stack, there is a tiny amount of play. Using a lock ring, the cog is under pressure and will remain straight on the hub, but with the gear clamp there is a tiny amount of play that ended up being enough to allow skipping with a tensioner.

    That being said, I have two Gear Clamps and find them to be a killer product and continue to use them.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oliver View Post
    Is it really that hard to brake out a chain whip, and switch a cog, what is it, 3 to 4 minutes tops.
    Now that I started thinking about it, it really isn't such a big fuss. Maybe I should keep the chain whip and lock ring tool more easily available so I'd be out of excuses.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneBadWagon View Post
    When using a sprung tensioner, I was getting abnormal skipping, seemingly because with the Gear Clamp there is no compression on the cog stack, there is a tiny amount of play.
    I wondered how you'd know you had the play out of the cog setup using that system. I guess you just push it over tighten it up and hope for the best?
    Chasing bears through the woods drunk with a dull hatchet is strongly not advised

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by wv_bob View Post
    I wondered how you'd know you had the play out of the cog setup using that system. I guess you just push it over tighten it up and hope for the best?
    preload it with spacers and regular lockring then tighten the clamp.

    not really sold with this design.
    everything sucks but my vacuum cleaner.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by fishcreek View Post
    preload it with spacers and regular lockring then tighten the clamp.

    not really sold with this design.
    But then I don't really see the benefit. You still have to use a lock ring tool and chain whip and it seems like more work in the end. To me, spacers and the right tools are quick and easy enough. Plus, I like the look of the spacers on the freewheel. It takes me less than 2 minutes to change out cogs.

  16. #16
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    There aren't any special tools needed and there isn't any play at all between the cog and the base. It's manufactured very tight and solid. I like the feeling of swapping it out without using the other tools and what I feel can turn out to be wear and tear on the freewheel body. The lock ring/spring, or whatever it's called, can be pulled off using a thumbnail.

  17. #17
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    I'd be curiuos to see if the cog indents the aluminium carrier over time, especially those running low ratios with a large cog. Was planning on trying one, but shipping here is a bit steep ... have to get a few more people interested first.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by trrubicon06 View Post
    No experience with those, but I do with Gear Clamp. I find these very easy for adjusting chainline and swapping standard cogs.



    This is an ugly solution to a problem that doesn't even exist.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    This is an ugly solution to a problem that doesn't even exist.
    Ugly doesn't mean its not effective!

    I have used gear clamps along with the same make cogs (Niner) with great success. Since all the Niner Cogalicious cogs are the same width..no adjustment needed except for the slider. No cassette tool or chainwhip needed to remove or swap...Just 3mm allen wrench. They are also very light and inexpensive ($20).

    I however, know exactly which cog I need for where I ride or have been riding..so I use regular spacers because it does look cleaner and goes with the other gold on my bike. If I do travel, and do need to swap cogs, I put the clamps back on!

    Sprocket47- sorry for the thread steal, but GearClamps are another great solution.
    ..and no I don't work for them, nor do I receive any promotions from the company.
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  20. #20
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    Here you go; http://pardo.net/bike/pic/fail-029/index.html

    Although if you need more than one rear cog why not just go 1x9?

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubdryver View Post
    Ugly doesn't mean its not effective!

    I have used gear clamps along with the same make cogs (Niner) with great success. Since all the Niner Cogalicious cogs are the same width..no adjustment needed except for the slider. No cassette tool or chainwhip needed to remove or swap...Just 3mm allen wrench. They are also very light and inexpensive ($20).

    I however, know exactly which cog I need for where I ride or have been riding..so I use regular spacers because it does look cleaner and goes with the other gold on my bike. If I do travel, and do need to swap cogs, I put the clamps back on!

    Sprocket47- sorry for the thread steal, but GearClamps are another great solution.
    ..and no I don't work for them, nor do I receive any promotions from the company.
    I also can't imagine trying to take those things off when they're all caked with mud.

  22. #22
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    that clamp will be less ugly if they did the bolts like what you see on lock-on grips. still not buying though.

    everything sucks but my vacuum cleaner.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    This is an ugly solution to a problem that doesn't even exist.
    Unless you want to be able to change cogs with a multi-tool...

  24. #24
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    Although the cogs are very easy to change, that was not the primary goal of the design. In fact the 1st prototype was a 3-piece design with the cog in the center and the cassette had to be dissembled to change the cog.

    The primary goal was to make a low cost cog out of the highest quality material and manufacturing processes available. By using a two piece design, there is not much wasted material and machine time as you would get trying to machine it from one solid part. We are able to sell what is probably the highest quality cog out there for only $25; it would have cost 4-5 times that if it was machined from single piece. Also the cassette spline of any cog usually has no wear compared to the teeth, so paying for that to be machined every time you buy a new cog is a waste. Our driver can be reused with other cog sizes so there is no waste.

    We have tested this design for the past nine months with heavy strong riders and so far not even a hint of any wear on the cog teeth or spline interface. The deep, large diameter spline interface has so much surface area that the load in pounds/sq.in is very low and will not cause any displacement or wear of the material.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by TacoMan View Post
    Although the cogs are very easy to change, that was not the primary goal of the design. In fact the 1st prototype was a 3-piece design with the cog in the center and the cassette had to be dissembled to change the cog.

    The primary goal was to make a low cost cog out of the highest quality material and manufacturing processes available. By using a two piece design, there is not much wasted material and machine time as you would get trying to machine it from one solid part. We are able to sell what is probably the highest quality cog out there for only $25; it would have cost 4-5 times that if it was machined from single piece.
    Thanks for the background. The additional context really highlights the creativity and innovation that was applied to the product.

  26. #26
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    cool. here's a market for you, create a similar design for splined cranks, like a spider with interchangeable chainring size. i would opt for bolts though than snap ring.
    everything sucks but my vacuum cleaner.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by fishcreek View Post
    cool. here's a market for you, create a similar design for splined cranks, like a spider with interchangeable chainring size. i would opt for bolts though than snap ring.
    That's a good idea. I guess the only drawback is all the different spline sizes. Which ones do you think are the most popular?

    FYI, we will have a matching SS four bolt 32T chainring coming out soon. Aluminum rings just don't hold up very long to heavy singlespeed use. I have already went through a few without any sign of wear on the cog.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuvok View Post
    Thanks for the background. The additional context really highlights the creativity and innovation that was applied to the product.
    Everything maintenance/repair related is a PITA when its caked with mud.
    I am pretty sure with other system, you'd want to clean everything up before operating on it too.
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  29. #29
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    if you have three popular splines, with a common chainring for all of them, i guess its not that bad.
    everything sucks but my vacuum cleaner.

  30. #30
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    +1 Gearclamp. I'm gonna try 18t from 20t. I'm gonna switch it while I'm in the trail. And a bottle of beer just in case.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubdryver View Post
    Everything maintenance/repair related is a PITA when its caked with mud.
    I am pretty sure with other system, you'd want to clean everything up before operating on it too.
    No doubt. I'm more interested in the modularity of the design and even the possibility of more economically being able to use different material types/sizes of cogs. Also like the idea of applying the concept to chainrings/cranks.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubdryver View Post
    Everything maintenance/repair related is a PITA when its caked with mud.
    I am pretty sure with other system, you'd want to clean everything up before operating on it too.
    The smooth surface of spacers is an easy cleanup however. Not so sure about the free hub body.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saul Lumikko View Post
    Now that I started thinking about it, it really isn't such a big fuss. Maybe I should keep the chain whip and lock ring tool more easily available so I'd be out of excuses.
    Now we are talking!

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    This is an ugly solution to a problem that doesn't even exist.
    Amen Brother!

  35. #35
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    The gear clamp does not really make any sense. If you have to take the cassette apart to change cogs, then just use spacers. Worst of all is having a loose cog in between the clamps, the standard spline is so small the last thing you want is a cog moving around on it and there is no way to develope any preload. A cog clamped with spacers and a lockring is going to be way better.

    I agree it is a ugly solution to a problem that does not exist, actually it just creates more problems.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by TacoMan View Post
    The gear clamp does not really make any sense. If you have to take the cassette apart to change cogs, then just use spacers. Worst of all is having a loose cog in between the clamps, the standard spline is so small the last thing you want is a cog moving around on it and there is no way to develope any preload. A cog clamped with spacers and a lockring is going to be way better.

    I agree it is a ugly solution to a problem that does not exist, actually it just creates more problems.
    Have you ever used them?

  37. #37
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    Any updates on the "quick-cog"? I just finished building my first SS but still working on finding the right gearing. This seems like a pretty good idea if there are no long term issues that comes up.

  38. #38
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    I just installed one on my bike last week. It is very easy to change cogs and once the snaprings are in place the cog is solid as a rock. I put 90kms on it last weekend it is was faultless. Great design IMO.

  39. #39
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    I've got one of each size Chris King Cog from 15-20 and use them all pretty regularly but when it comes to my local trails I needed a 22 to avoid killing myself. King doesn't make anything bigger then a 20 so I looked to Lunar for a solution with other possible advantages(easy swap cogs). So far I only have the 22 but I'm about to order an 18 & 20 to make swapping cogs during a 10 day bike camping trip easier. As far as durability goes, I've use it on only the steepest trails you can find, you know the ones that have most geared riders walking after a 1/2 mile and it hasn't skipped a beat. So far it's got about 200 miles on it with I luring one extremely steep 8hr endurance race.

    As for the question of play between the carrier and cog. Well as a machinist myself there is a bit more then I would have expected but were only talking like a deg or two of play. It feels like a lot when you are over analyzing it but in reality it nothing your going to feel and will most likely to away after a bit of grim finds its way into all the nooks and crannys. Just for the hell of it I just powder coated my 22 orange because you can never be to customized. The extra couple .001 of powder coat has pretty much taken up any of the play that way originally there.

    Swapping cogs made easy-d409468b-1124-45af-87e5-0fcd1ae8ed83_zpsch37zyot.jpg

  40. #40
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    I'm using the quick-cog since few months now and works great, there is a very very little play of the cog between the springs but don't affect the chainline, I think that a small play is good so the cog can follow the chainline better.

    Interested to know how long the color last on the cog.

    Having colored bases will be great!!

  41. #41
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    I've been using the Quick Cogs for over a year now. Totally happy with the quality, durability etc. Very good product and great value if you like to have a few different ratios to choose from.

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