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  1. #26
    one chain loop
    Reputation: fishcreek's Avatar
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    cool. here's a market for you, create a similar design for splined cranks, like a spider with interchangeable chainring size. i would opt for bolts though than snap ring.
    everything sucks but my vacuum cleaner.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by fishcreek View Post
    cool. here's a market for you, create a similar design for splined cranks, like a spider with interchangeable chainring size. i would opt for bolts though than snap ring.
    That's a good idea. I guess the only drawback is all the different spline sizes. Which ones do you think are the most popular?

    FYI, we will have a matching SS four bolt 32T chainring coming out soon. Aluminum rings just don't hold up very long to heavy singlespeed use. I have already went through a few without any sign of wear on the cog.

  3. #28
    Trail Junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuvok View Post
    Thanks for the background. The additional context really highlights the creativity and innovation that was applied to the product.
    Everything maintenance/repair related is a PITA when its caked with mud.
    I am pretty sure with other system, you'd want to clean everything up before operating on it too.
    Santa Cruz Tallboy c
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  4. #29
    one chain loop
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    if you have three popular splines, with a common chainring for all of them, i guess its not that bad.
    everything sucks but my vacuum cleaner.

  5. #30
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    +1 Gearclamp. I'm gonna try 18t from 20t. I'm gonna switch it while I'm in the trail. And a bottle of beer just in case.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubdryver View Post
    Everything maintenance/repair related is a PITA when its caked with mud.
    I am pretty sure with other system, you'd want to clean everything up before operating on it too.
    No doubt. I'm more interested in the modularity of the design and even the possibility of more economically being able to use different material types/sizes of cogs. Also like the idea of applying the concept to chainrings/cranks.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubdryver View Post
    Everything maintenance/repair related is a PITA when its caked with mud.
    I am pretty sure with other system, you'd want to clean everything up before operating on it too.
    The smooth surface of spacers is an easy cleanup however. Not so sure about the free hub body.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saul Lumikko View Post
    Now that I started thinking about it, it really isn't such a big fuss. Maybe I should keep the chain whip and lock ring tool more easily available so I'd be out of excuses.
    Now we are talking!

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    This is an ugly solution to a problem that doesn't even exist.
    Amen Brother!

  10. #35
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    The gear clamp does not really make any sense. If you have to take the cassette apart to change cogs, then just use spacers. Worst of all is having a loose cog in between the clamps, the standard spline is so small the last thing you want is a cog moving around on it and there is no way to develope any preload. A cog clamped with spacers and a lockring is going to be way better.

    I agree it is a ugly solution to a problem that does not exist, actually it just creates more problems.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by TacoMan View Post
    The gear clamp does not really make any sense. If you have to take the cassette apart to change cogs, then just use spacers. Worst of all is having a loose cog in between the clamps, the standard spline is so small the last thing you want is a cog moving around on it and there is no way to develope any preload. A cog clamped with spacers and a lockring is going to be way better.

    I agree it is a ugly solution to a problem that does not exist, actually it just creates more problems.
    Have you ever used them?

  12. #37
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    Any updates on the "quick-cog"? I just finished building my first SS but still working on finding the right gearing. This seems like a pretty good idea if there are no long term issues that comes up.

  13. #38
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    I just installed one on my bike last week. It is very easy to change cogs and once the snaprings are in place the cog is solid as a rock. I put 90kms on it last weekend it is was faultless. Great design IMO.

  14. #39
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    I've got one of each size Chris King Cog from 15-20 and use them all pretty regularly but when it comes to my local trails I needed a 22 to avoid killing myself. King doesn't make anything bigger then a 20 so I looked to Lunar for a solution with other possible advantages(easy swap cogs). So far I only have the 22 but I'm about to order an 18 & 20 to make swapping cogs during a 10 day bike camping trip easier. As far as durability goes, I've use it on only the steepest trails you can find, you know the ones that have most geared riders walking after a 1/2 mile and it hasn't skipped a beat. So far it's got about 200 miles on it with I luring one extremely steep 8hr endurance race.

    As for the question of play between the carrier and cog. Well as a machinist myself there is a bit more then I would have expected but were only talking like a deg or two of play. It feels like a lot when you are over analyzing it but in reality it nothing your going to feel and will most likely to away after a bit of grim finds its way into all the nooks and crannys. Just for the hell of it I just powder coated my 22 orange because you can never be to customized. The extra couple .001 of powder coat has pretty much taken up any of the play that way originally there.

    Swapping cogs made easy-d409468b-1124-45af-87e5-0fcd1ae8ed83_zpsch37zyot.jpg

  15. #40
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    I'm using the quick-cog since few months now and works great, there is a very very little play of the cog between the springs but don't affect the chainline, I think that a small play is good so the cog can follow the chainline better.

    Interested to know how long the color last on the cog.

    Having colored bases will be great!!

  16. #41
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    I've been using the Quick Cogs for over a year now. Totally happy with the quality, durability etc. Very good product and great value if you like to have a few different ratios to choose from.

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