Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sasquatch rides a SS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    4,634

    Surly Singleator question

    I want to get a Surly Singleator...does anyone know if I can take the inner and outer chainguides off and only have the jockey wheel?

    Mountain bikers who don't road ride have no legs...
    Road riders who don't mountain bike have no soul...

  2. #2
    I'd rather be riding
    Reputation: zippinveedub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    638
    You could probably do it, but I took the sides off my modified forte tensioner and under extreme pressure the chain walks off the tensioner's wheel. I ordered a rollenlager to fix my issues.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    7,657
    Are you using a full suspension frame? If not, why are you even bothering with a sprung tensioner? Stop relying on a spring to tension your chain and put a rigid tensioner on there.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: seat_boy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    1,551
    Any reason why? I've never had issues with my cheap spring tensioner.

    Actually, it's been more reliable (in terms of wheel slipping or other things that would stop me from riding to fix something) than any of my bikes with sliding dropouts, for instance.

    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    Are you using a full suspension frame? If not, why are you even bothering with a sprung tensioner? Stop relying on a spring to tension your chain and put a rigid tensioner on there.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    7,657
    Quote Originally Posted by seat_boy
    Any reason why?
    Yes. Once you set your tension, there is no reason to have a spring in the system. A rigid tensioner, once set, is set. You don't have to worry about it bouncing or losing tension on the chain in rough terrain. There's less chance of losing your chain or noise with a rigid tensioner. A rigid tensioner is mechanically simpler, stronger, and has less ways to fail.

    Really, why do you want to keep relying on a spring to keep your chain tensioned?

  6. #6
    Dinner for wolves
    Reputation: buddhak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,513
    Anybody recall the parable about the oak and the reed?
    Responds to gravity

  7. #7
    human dehumidifier
    Reputation: wv_bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    4,812
    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    Really, why do you want to keep relying on a spring to keep your chain tensioned?
    Because it works, and it's what I've got?

    Aren't there interference issues with the rigid tensioners and hooded drops? Yeah it can be fixed with a grinder, but why bother if you don't have to. I've never had problems with either of my spring tensioned bikes (both pushing up)
    I Just Wasn't Made For These Times

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    7,657
    Quote Originally Posted by wv_bob
    Aren't there interference issues with the rigid tensioners and hooded drops?
    There are rigid tensioners which mount only to the hanger, and so don't have that problem.

    There's just less to go wrong with a rigid tensioner, and there's no chance of getting chain slap.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sasquatch rides a SS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    4,634
    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch rides a SS
    I want to get a Surly Singleator...does anyone know if I can take the inner and outer chainguides off and only have the jockey wheel?


    Does anyone mind answering this question?
    Mountain bikers who don't road ride have no legs...
    Road riders who don't mountain bike have no soul...

  10. #10
    I'd rather be riding
    Reputation: zippinveedub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    638
    Looking at the parts list on their site for it, you should be able to remove the guides and replace them with very small washers (to enable the bearing to spin). So yes. http://surlybikes.com/uploads/downlo...leatorInfo.pdf

  11. #11
    human dehumidifier
    Reputation: wv_bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    4,812
    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch rides a SS
    Does anyone mind answering this question?
    OK ... I wouldn't do it. Do the chainguides hit something? I can think of no other rational reason to take them off, especially considering this from post #2

    Quote Originally Posted by zippinveedub
    You could probably do it, but I took the sides off my modified forte tensioner and under extreme pressure the chain walks off the tensioner's wheel. I ordered a rollenlager to fix my issues.
    The Singleator on my bike works up and down, so I can see how that motion, a fast moving chain, bouncing on the trail, and the lack of chain guides could result in a thrown chain.

    If the thing is making noise, take it apart and grease the jockey wheel. Mine did, I did, and now it doesn't.
    I Just Wasn't Made For These Times

  12. #12
    I'd rather be riding
    Reputation: zippinveedub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    638
    It does throw the chain, I've tried it. He wanted to know if you could take then off so I just let him know.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sasquatch rides a SS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    4,634
    I run a sette tensioner right now without the guides on and I don't have any problems. I just want the surly because they are stiffer and have bearings in them whereas the sette is cheaply built. I guess I should have specified earlier that I just think the guard looks dumb and if I can take it off I will.
    Mountain bikers who don't road ride have no legs...
    Road riders who don't mountain bike have no soul...

  14. #14
    human dehumidifier
    Reputation: wv_bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    4,812
    I wouldn't go presuming the Surly has any bearings in it ... because it doesn't. It's got bushings just like the Sette does.

    The real differences between the Surly and the spring-loaded Sette is the Surly can push up and down, where the Sette only pushes down, and the styling of the Surly is more refined. For that matter, IIRC old Surly Singleators look just like the Settes do.
    I Just Wasn't Made For These Times

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    7,657
    Just throw one of these on, and no more worries about dropping your chain or bushings:

  16. #16
    I'd rather be riding
    Reputation: zippinveedub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    638
    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    Just throw one of these on, and no more worries about dropping your chain or bushings:
    Just got one in the mail, and stared at it for a while, sure is a pretty piece of aluminum. I'm such a dork. On a happy note my chain stays on now! And is much quieter.

  17. #17
    Drinking the Slick_Juice
    Reputation: nuck_chorris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,812
    if you want a spring tensioner with bearing get a Gusset Squire:

    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...s.php?id=30651

    personally I like spring tensioners because when your chainring and cog dont center the spring doesnt put too much pressure on the chain and your drivetrain like the rigid kind of tensioners.
    "If women don't find handsome , they should at least find you handy."-Red Green

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    7,657
    Quote Originally Posted by nuck_chorris
    personally I like spring tensioners because when your chainring and cog dont center the spring doesnt put too much pressure on the chain and your drivetrain like the rigid kind of tensioners.
    ...what?

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    213
    I'm using a Surly Singleator in push-up configuration without the guides. No issues.

    I've used it before in push-down configuration, also with no issues, except for being unable to put enough tension on the chain once it stretched. But that will happen with any push-down sprung tensioner. Push-up is definitely the superior configuration, assuming you don't have chainstay interference issues. If you do, shorten the chain as much as you can and put a bigger jockey wheel on the tensioner. (I replaced the 10t jockey wheel on my Singleator with the 11t wheel from my Forte tensioner.)
    Opinions are like a**holes: Sometimes they need to be punched in the face and told to STFU.

  20. #20
    Drinking the Slick_Juice
    Reputation: nuck_chorris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,812
    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    ...what?
    ok , im assuming you have used a spring tensioner, when you spin the cranks a few rotations you will see the tensioner ob up and down depending where your chain is on the cog and chain ring. this is due to not having a centered chain ring and cog, are you with me still? you cant perfectly center a cog and chainring on the hub and crank(unless you have something like the white ind. crank and a really precise high dollar hub and cog) which gives that small amount of up and down movement. such a small amount of alignment can put quite a bit of pressure on your drivetrain. i dont know how else to explain it
    "If women don't find handsome , they should at least find you handy."-Red Green

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    7,657
    Quote Originally Posted by nuck_chorris
    ok , im assuming you have used a spring tensioner, when you spin the cranks a few rotations you will see the tensioner ob up and down depending where your chain is on the cog and chain ring. this is due to not having a centered chain ring and cog, are you with me still?
    Ok, that's what I thought you meant, but wasn't sure. The easy way around that is to figure out at which crank position the chain is tightest, and then set your chain tension with the crank at that position.

  22. #22
    Drinking the Slick_Juice
    Reputation: nuck_chorris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,812
    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    Ok, that's what I thought you meant, but wasn't sure. The easy way around that is to figure out at which crank position the chain is tightest, and then set your chain tension with the crank at that position.

    yes but how much easier is it with a spring tensioner. i never had a problem with my Surly tensioner for 4 years up until my frame died. the only thing that broke was the spring because it was over tight
    "If women don't find handsome , they should at least find you handy."-Red Green

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •