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Thread: Surly Fixxer?

  1. #1
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    Have it on my Van Dessel CRB using Parallax hubs. Works fine. Originally, I bought the bike w/ the fixxer and a freewheel. It's now fixed w/ a track cog.

  2. #2
    SuperSwedishSinglespeeder
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    Surly Fixxer?

    Has anyone used a Surly Fixxer before? It is worth it? Is it durable?

    I think it would be a nice way to convert an old MTB to a fixie for road riding. I don't have the balls to ride fixie on the dirt.

    What's the consensus?

    SSwedan

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSwedan
    Has anyone used a Surly Fixxer before? It is worth it? Is it durable?

    I think it would be a nice way to convert an old MTB to a fixie for road riding. I don't have the balls to ride fixie on the dirt.

    What's the consensus?

    SSwedan
    I've used mine on a few different bikes and a few different hubs. I had to replace the bearing because the original crapped out and got rough (more than likely I did something to mess it up)...but the bearing swap was simple. It's a solid product.

    Oh, and take it to the dirt.

  4. #4
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    i had a fixxer on my older xtr hub and the hub splines and the fixxer's mating surface didnt fit very snuggly. this caused some annoying rotation when accerlating, braking, trackstanding etc. and coudlnt be fixed by simply tightening the bolt... as i didnt want to destroy the hub i took it off and opted for the freewheel. i did love it except fo the sight rotation issue and will hopefull put it on a different hub in the future...

  5. #5
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    Or you could use JB weld...

    on a regular, blown out shimano freehub body.
    Advantages compared to fixxer: you use bmx cogs (way cheaper than track cogs), you have super simple chainline adjustability, the mating between hub shell and f-hub body is guaranteed to work w/o slop, it will only cost you some time and the cost of the jb weld.

    Disadvantages compared to fixxer: it takes more time(took me 4 hours), it takes more advanced tinkering ability, you have to deal with condescention and disbelief from people who know it all.

    If you want to try it i could tell you my top-secret technique, which i had lots of fun figuring out. I'm now going to head out on a ride on my hacked stx fixed gear hub. later.

  6. #6
    SuperSwedishSinglespeeder
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    Quote Originally Posted by dana s
    on a regular, blown out shimano freehub body.
    Advantages compared to fixxer: you use bmx cogs (way cheaper than track cogs), you have super simple chainline adjustability, the mating between hub shell and f-hub body is guaranteed to work w/o slop, it will only cost you some time and the cost of the jb weld.

    Disadvantages compared to fixxer: it takes more time(took me 4 hours), it takes more advanced tinkering ability, you have to deal with condescention and disbelief from people who know it all.

    If you want to try it i could tell you my top-secret technique, which i had lots of fun figuring out. I'm now going to head out on a ride on my hacked stx fixed gear hub. later.
    Thanks for the tip, but I'm a child of the suburbs (no welding going on at my house). Besides, I like the idea of being able to change it back and forth from fixie as needs arise.

    Dan

  7. #7
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    There is no actual welding involved with using JB weld, it is almost like a glue that welds everything together. Although I have never used it, but that is my understanding. If I had a hub with a shot freewheel than I would do it, but I am not doing that to a perfectly good hub. Also, as SSweden said, it would be nice to be able to switch back and forth.

    Mark

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by dana s
    on a regular, blown out shimano freehub body.
    Advantages compared to fixxer: you use bmx cogs (way cheaper than track cogs), you have super simple chainline adjustability, the mating between hub shell and f-hub body is guaranteed to work w/o slop, it will only cost you some time and the cost of the jb weld.

    Disadvantages compared to fixxer: it takes more time(took me 4 hours), it takes more advanced tinkering ability, you have to deal with condescention and disbelief from people who know it all.

    If you want to try it i could tell you my top-secret technique, which i had lots of fun figuring out. I'm now going to head out on a ride on my hacked stx fixed gear hub. later.

    I'd be interested to hear your approach!

  9. #9
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    I'd like to hear the JB weld details, too. I was considering brazing up a freehub for my fixed project bike, or the fixxer. Let's hear some details for us low budget types!

  10. #10
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    Fixxer is good. I have it on my Dura-Ace hub on my Cross bike...currently with a $12 Track cog, best spring training bike I've had yet.

    Shane

  11. #11
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    More on the top secret JB Weld kung fu technique...

    First i must say that i'm quite tickled to have the opportunity to share, the more people out there doing unauthorized things with their bikes the better! To clear up about JB weld, that's just the brand name of a kind of epoxy, it comes in two little tubes, you mix it up, you smear it on, all is well. All you need to use it is a container (a plastic cup is great) to mix in and something to mix/spread it with (a plastic knife works).

    Oh, if you want but do not have a blown freehub body, try your friendly lbs, i'll bet they can hook you up if you ask nicely.

    Oh oh, i know it's not quite as easy as a fixxer, but if you had a good freehub body kicking around you could switch the fixxed body for the regular one in a half an hour if you wanted. I like having it not be a permanant fixed wheel.

    So here is the technique that i've arrived at after experimenting with a few shimano freehubs, i am confident in the durability of the setup i've got, but ya know, try it for yourself and see if it works for you. I find it handy to have a whole wheel to work with rather than just the hub, btw.

    1. Spread out one of those grungy old t-shirts to catch any stray bearings, there are approximately one bazillion teeny bearings in a freehub and you'll want most of them back when you re-assemble everything. Put on some good wrenching music and keep some cold beverage handy, this will take some time.

    2. Remove the axle + bearings. Right behind the threads that you thread the cassette lockring into there is a dust cover thingy that the rubber seals on the axle mate with. This is removable, so pop it out. Clean out old grease + gunk.

    3. Now you are looking into the empty bearing cup that the wheel bearings used to ride in, there should be two big notches out on the sides of the cup. You need to finangle some kind of tool into these notches in order to remove the cup. Finding the right tool was the hardest part of this for me. I eventually scrounged up a pair of needle nosed pliers with an angled tip that worked well, use whatever works. This part is REVERSE THREADED, so don't go cranking on it in the wrong direction. On all of the freehubs i worked on the cone wasn't on there that tight, so once i got a tool that fit it came off quite easily.

    4. Once you get the cup beginning to unscrew now take your 10mm hex and unscrew the freehub fixing bolt that holds the freehub body to the hub shell and lift the freehub body free. If you loosened the cup up all of the way you may now have those little teensy bearings everywhere. In any case now finish unscrewing the cup and the freehub will come apart. Admire the cool gizmos, play with the pawls, then remove the spring holding the pawls on. You've now completely disassembled the freehub.

    5. Collect all of the parts of the freehub and give them a good bath. Epoxy won't stick to a greasy surface, so this is important. I put all of the parts in a 1 quart yogurt container with citrus degreaser and water, shook vigorously for a few minutes, the used a toothbrush, then rinsed and dried.

    6. Next i busted out the dremel with grinding tips and roughed up all inside surfaces except the bearing cup for the main wheel bearings. This may not be strictly necessary, but it helps the epoxy adhere and makes me feel more competent and professional than i actually am.

    7. Using the dremel i now cut and ground chunks of an old 5mm hex key to fit into the recess of the pawl carrier where there is no pawl, ya know? In order to make this easier i trimmed the pawl reatining spring thing a bit. Pictures would be handy here, but basically i got a piece of ground down hex wedged in there so that the outer shell couldn't rotate around the pawl carrier anymore. Thus making it a fixed hub instead of a freehub. Remember when trying this out that when you put it all together you need to be able to screw the bearing cup back on straight, so at this point it won't be wedged in there tightly, there will still be some slop.

    8. Experiment with the chunks of metal , try test assembling it to make sure it will all go smoothly when the epoxy is everywhere. Make sure it cannot freewheel. If you've got some time on your hands, consider even smaller bits of hex to fit behind the pawls.

    9. Mix some epoxy, i suggest letting the jb weld sit for a while so that it's not so runny, this helps to hold everything in place, especially the bearings. Rubber gloves might be a good idea here. It worked best for me to get the pawls on the pawl carrier, get some bearings stuck on with epoxy goop, coat the whole shebang with epoxy then carefully insert it into the outer shell. Then i made sure the crevices were all well coated with epoxy, and inserted all chopped up hex bits with tweezers.

    10. At this point you have the bottom (and hardest) part all done, all that's left to do is get some bearings stuck to the outside shell on their own little race, coat with a bit more goop, then carefully thread the bearing cup on. This part was a pain until i made sure the jb weld was cured enough to hold the bearings in place. If the bearings can swim around too freely they'll get in the way and prevent you from threading the cup all of the way on, which is not ok. Once it's all screwed on correctly clean the bearing cup really well, and let it sit somewhere to cure.

    11. Once the epoxy is dry you can reinstall it on your hub of choice. I've never been able to keep a freehub screwed on securely with anything other than loctite, so i recommend cleaning the threads in the hub shell and the freehub fixing bolt with degreaser, then loctiting. Then assemble, put a cog on and ride, yeee haw!

    Whew, that was quite the post. I hope this is helpful, enjoy.

    I'd love to hear feedback on how this works for others and/or other ideas for this sort of thing.

    rock on,
    dana

    have

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