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  1. #1
    853+29+1x24=Fun
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    Surly Fixed Gear Disc Hub

    This been posted yet?


  2. #2
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    Ummm.... I'm not real bright, can someone enlighten me as to "why"? I don't get it... is this scheduled for April 1 release?

  3. #3
    Full Tilt Boogie
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    Nice. I still like using disc mount cogs though. I can't imagine that a disc disc hub would be very popular though.
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  4. #4
    853+29+1x24=Fun
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fat Bob
    Ummm.... I'm not real bright, can someone enlighten me as to "why"? I don't get it... is this scheduled for April 1 release?
    I guess for guys that want to run front and rear disc on a fixie. I could see it being nice if you ride very hilly stuff. Might be nice having that back brake on there.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fat Bob
    Ummm.... I'm not real bright, can someone enlighten me as to "why"?
    HeeHee

  6. #6
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    pugpugpugpugpugpugpugpugpugpugpugpugpug


  7. #7
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    If you ride a single speed with disc brakes but want to switch back and forth to fixed gear, this is the hub for you. Build up a new wheel with this hub and swap back and forth whenever you want. Otherwise, if you were to have a 2nd wheel with a flip flop/hub, then what happens to the rear brake? You either remove it or you run the very high risk of grabbing a nonexistant brake and jamming the caliper when it doesn't have a rotor to squeeze. And although I have yet to try fixed gear offroad (but might now that this hub exists), I think the guys at 63xc.com recommended having a rear brake although I don't remember the reason why.

  8. #8
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    I'd buy this hub in a second for the "front" hub of my Pugsley. A nice Disc hub and a fixed cog, would make for a solid backup on the Pug. The only other way for a fixed/disc rear hub I know of is $Phil Wood$, which might still be an option depending on how much surly charges for their hub.
    Slowly slipping to retrogrouchyness

  9. #9
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    this product looks great, the phil is boku bucks, and IMO they are asking a little high for what it is. I can not wait til spring to buy this hub and I already emailed Aaron at Surly to see about getting one sooner. But alas, I bought a XT/WTB rear wheel and the Surly Fixxer. So hopefully I'll have fixed mtn with disc frt and rear by thursday.

    I have not messed with a Surly Fixxer but it looks self explanatory, Has anyone here used one? reviews???

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by G-reg
    I'd buy this hub in a second for the "front" hub of my Pugsley. A nice Disc hub and a fixed cog, would make for a solid backup on the Pug. The only other way for a fixed/disc rear hub I know of is $Phil Wood$, which might still be an option depending on how much surly charges for their hub.
    do you have pics of this pugsley? I have not seen one other then the surly site and doesnt do it justice.

  11. #11
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    AWESOME! I'm going to have to unlace my rear Surly flip flop and put one of these on.

  12. #12
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    Of course, you can also still thread a freewheel on there, so it's a more versatile hub than the SS hub. If I was building a disc equipped SS or fixed, I'd use a hub like this.

    although I also think someone should do a disc/disc hub.

  13. #13
    One Colorful Rider
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    I'll Show you Mine
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  14. #14
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    Yes Normbit, you have a fixed gear... and it is brakeless, and also does not have disc tabs... how is this relevant?

  15. #15
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    This is a pretty great idea, I think I would like to build one up as a spare wheel to take out everyonce ina while. Since its a surly it should be fairly inexpensive

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10speedbiopacefreewheel

    I have not messed with a Surly Fixxer but it looks self explanatory, Has anyone here used one? reviews???

    I have been using a fixxer on my Spinergy Rev-X road fixxie for 4 years with no problems, great product, alo have one on my Spinergy Spox MTN wheel with a white ind freewheel since 2003

    Both rock solid

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by benwitt11
    Nice. I still like using disc mount cogs though. I can't imagine that a disc disc hub would be very popular though.

    ive been thinking the same thing for years! wouldnt that be the funniest looking hub?

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by G-reg
    I'd buy this hub in a second for the "front" hub of my Pugsley. A nice Disc hub and a fixed cog, would make for a solid backup on the Pug.



    HERES THE HOT TICKET ON A PUG.

    setup your pug as a 1x9, with a fixed/disk front wheel to swap.

    now on your chain use TWO powerlinks, with the 2nd one at the exact length to shorten the chain to SS/fixed. now you can swap between 9speed and Fixed gear with NO TOOLS! (unless your using bolt on hubs,then just axle nuts.)

    a friend did it on his amazing pug build, works awesome.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hand/of/Midas
    HERES THE HOT TICKET ON A PUG.

    setup your pug as a 1x9, with a fixed/disk front wheel to swap.

    now on your chain use TWO powerlinks, with the 2nd one at the exact length to shorten the chain to SS/fixed. now you can swap between 9speed and Fixed gear with NO TOOLS! (unless your using bolt on hubs,then just axle nuts.)

    a friend did it on his amazing pug build, works awesome.
    That's the plan. Here's the pug in "instant gratification mode," I'm still waiting for lots of parts. It might see it's first Snow here pretty quick. My pic doesn't do it justice either, the only thing worse at taking pictures than me is my camera.
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    Last edited by G-reg; 10-11-2008 at 07:35 AM.
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  20. #20
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    I want this Surly fixed hub for fixed gear disc applications. The likely target will be a Vassago Fisticuff cross bike. Maybe a Surly 1x1 with 700c wheels.

  21. #21
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    Yes, for MtFix you need a rear brake. Disk brakes are easier to adjust with the chain tension (IMHO)

    This is a flip/flop with a BMX rotor adapter (which required machining to work). I am tooling up to machine lockring threads into a SS/disc hub currently (because if you really need that back brake to keep you from rolling back down a hill the adapter will unscrew DAMHIK)

    If this hub was available right now, I would buy one right now. In the meantime, machining proceeds - with one eye open for this hub.
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    This isn't a "you're doing it wrong" topic.

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  22. #22
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    Is that a 29r wheel on a 1X1?

  23. #23
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    Hey, I should get some credit for this...

    I asked the Surly crew at Interbike for this 3 years ago. I'll gladly accept a free hub as payment for giving them the idea!

    Here's what I did for a limp-home solution to a fixed front Pugsley:

    Pugsley Fixie Front Solution.

    It actually feels very solid, but I haven't put many miles on it.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by kev0153
    I guess for guys that want to run front and rear disc on a fixie. I could see it being nice if you ride very hilly stuff. Might be nice having that back brake on there.
    Exactly. A rear brake will give you more control on steep downhills and chunky rock descents. It also will save your legs for doing longer rides on a fixed mtb. I have a wheel with disc rotor and freewheel, and this one with a bolt on TomiCog and the cassette SS side.



    I can go to the cassette side to get home, with thrashed hams that fixed can give you, if needed, but without a rear brake.

    I had a V-brake rear for some time, but one wheel has a 22mm rims and the one pictured as a 40mm rim. Finally, Surly will make me a happy boy with that hub! It was mentioned in this recent thread.
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  25. #25
    meh... whatever
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    Quote Originally Posted by wadester
    Yes, for MtFix you need a rear brake.
    well, i wouldn't say "need" as plenty of peoples ride mtn scorchers zippity fast through the gnar-gnar and/or very long rides completely sans rear brake.

    rather than "need a rear brake" i would suggest it's more a matter of preference/skill/conditioning; with the latter two weighing heavily on the choice.
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fwilpum
    Is that a 29r wheel on a 1X1?
    No, just a Karate Monkey

    Quote Originally Posted by Wadester
    Yes, for MtFix you need a rear brake.
    Quote Originally Posted by Monogod
    well, i wouldn't say "need" as plenty of peoples ride mtn scorchers zippity fast through the gnar-gnar and/or very long rides completely sans rear brake.

    rather than "need a rear brake" i would suggest it's more a matter of preference/skill/conditioning; with the latter two weighing heavily on the choice.
    Allow me to rephrase: I find that I absolutely need a rear brake for me on the trails that I ride. I would highly recommend any MtFixxer who intends to ride vertically challenging trails have a rear brake. I find that when I need to use a brake, the slope is usually steep enough that the use of a front brake alone would inspire facial geology
    This isn't a "you're doing it wrong" topic.

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  27. #27
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    Great point. I use the rear on my SS (freewheel) bike a LOT in really steep downhill terrain. I ride fixed almost exclusively on the road and I can't imagine not having a rear brake in those sections for the geology reasons mentioned above.

  28. #28
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    On my "Normal Fixie MTB" I don't find a need for a rear brake, my legs provide way more braking than the rear wheel has traction for. That is especially true when it is steep or loose. You can't get back and weight the rear wheel very well on a fixie, whether or not you are using legs or a brake to slow down. Which is why I run a front brake.

    The Pugsley is a different animal though, I'm pretty sure the traction from an Endomorph has more than my legs can give it.
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  29. #29
    meh... whatever
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    Quote Originally Posted by wadester
    Allow me to rephrase: I find that I absolutely need a rear brake for me on the trails that I ride. I would highly recommend any MtFixxer who intends to ride vertically challenging trails have a rear brake. I find that when I need to use a brake, the slope is usually steep enough that the use of a front brake alone would inspire facial geology
    well, i certainly never said "front brake alone" as when one is riding a scorcher they control the speed of the rear wheel with their legs. thus even without a mechanical brake stopping power is still applied to the rear wheel via leg braking. just takes a different set of skills/conditioning to do so riding rapidly/technically.

    generally the rear wheel doesn't provide much stopping power since over 70% of braking comes from the front brake, even more so when going down a steep slope or during heavy application of the front brake due to the rear of the vehicle being unweighted. the rear brake offers supplemental braking and directional control more than anything else, and most people can provide more braking power via their legs than the rear tyre's traction can accommodate. it just requires different riding skill/style/conditioning than when riding a freewheel bike.

    hence the statement "rather than "need a rear brake" i would suggest it's more a matter of preference/skill/conditioning; with the latter two weighing heavily on the choice.".

    skill/conditioning definitely weigh heavily on the preference one has for running a rear brake on a mtn scorcher and it wasn't meant to be an insult to those who run a rear brake. it just is what it is, that's all. plenty of people ride mtn scorchers zippity fast through the gnar-gnar with no brake while plenty of people like having a brake. each to their own choice/skill/conditioning.

    admittedly it does take some skill to leg brake the rear wheel with one's weight back while out of the saddle during technical descents and/or rapid riding, but from personal experience i can attest that it's totally doable and tons of fun.

    but is that the best choice for someone just getting into riding a mtn scorcher? well that's another topic entirely, and i would generally lean more towards your position on that one until their skills/conditioning progress.
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  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by monogod
    just takes a different set of skills/conditioning to do so riding rapidly/technically.

    it just requires different riding skill/style/conditioning than when riding a freewheel bike.

    i would suggest it's more a matter of preference/skill/conditioning;

    skill/conditioning definitely weigh heavily on the preference one has for running a rear brake

    each to their own choice/skill/conditioning.

    admittedly it does take some skill to leg brake the rear wheel with one's weight back while out of the saddle during technical descents and/or rapid riding, but from personal experience i can attest that it's totally doable and tons of fun.

    i would generally lean more towards your position on that one until their skills/conditioning progress.
    Skills/conditioning aside, some of us live where there are substantial mountains, and we might climb 3000 - 5,6 7, 8000 feet in a ride, and then descent that few thousand feet back down. Rear brakes are nice for that, and maybe it is not used 95% of the time, but that 5% availability is a Godsend..

    Maybe you can argue that it is a lack of conditioning to wuss out like that, sometimes, my need to need to make a living gets in the way of my "conditioning time". I can do those rides with a freewheel just fine, but the fixed mtb takes much more out of me, so I like a rear brake.
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  31. #31
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    Hey Slocaus, Mono was making a comment to the previous comment of NEEDING a rear brake. You Dont NEED a rear brake on any bike, Fixed, SS, or 27 speed. Its smart to have one on there, and makes life easer and more conveinient. It will defenitly make you more confident to go faster, or down some schetchy sections, but alas its still not needed. Some sort of brake is needed I will agree to that.
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2WheelMark
    You Dont NEED a rear brake on any bike, Fixed, SS, or 27 speed.

    It will defenitly make you more confident to go faster, or down some schetchy sections, but alas its still not needed.
    I'm not a wuss or lacking bike handling skills, but I will definitely disagree to this statement. If you can slow down on a technical/rooty/rocky decent and ice without one, then bravo, I am a believer.
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  33. #33
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    Who brought being a wuss into this, you guys are reading into this too much, take a breath, and read the words slowly. Nobody called anyone a wuss, so quit creating false drama.
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  34. #34
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    Didn't say that you called me either. Maybe you can get away without rear brakes on a fixie but not on a freewheel, unless you ride at a walking pace all the time.
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  35. #35
    meh... whatever
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    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus
    Skills/conditioning aside, some of us live where there are substantial mountains, and we might climb 3000 - 5,6 7, 8000 feet in a ride, and then descent that few thousand feet back down. Rear brakes are nice for that, and maybe it is not used 95% of the time, but that 5% availability is a Godsend..
    hmmmm.... i think most people would agree that's not an example of "skills/conditioning aside", and would say that you actually succinctly described the NEED for skills/conditioning to ride a scorcher without a rear brake.

    since you have shared your riding experiences, i will share mine as well. i ride my scorcher very rapidly off road both up and down hills and over/through the gnar-gnar/techie stuff and have no problem with having only the capacity to leg brake during descents. even very long ones. not bragging, it just is what it is. and there are several people on the board who can attest to it.

    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus
    Maybe you can argue that it is a lack of conditioning to wuss out like that, sometimes, my need to need to make a living gets in the way of my "conditioning time". I can do those rides with a freewheel just fine, but the fixed mtb takes much more out of me, so I like a rear brake.
    so what you're clearly saying is that the choice to run a rear brake on your mtn scorcher pretty much revolved around your skills/conditioning. (or more aptly your self-confessed lack thereof)

    in other words, you went to great lengths and detail to make the very point you're arguing against.

    uh.... yeah. ok.
    Last edited by monogod; 10-13-2008 at 12:56 PM.
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    Im not saying that you said I called you anything. Im saying that nobody called or inferred any name towards anyone. So how did the wuss thing get in the threads, my whole involvement in this thread is to simply call out those who are taking things out of context, and reading between the lines. I dont ride fixed, I dont ride without a rear brake, but thats just me. Nobody is a wuss for riding either way, but its preference and I stand behind my claim, rear brakes on a fixie-MTB is not a necessity. If you are worried about missing work due to crashing therefore want the rear brake thats a personal choice. Also if you live on the side of Everest (or similar local) and you think you need the rear brake than yippy for you, but its still not a requirement.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2WheelMark
    but its still not a requirement.
    sorry, i'm just confused. so you run a rear brake but its not a requirement, pretty much contradicting view isn't it. it was there for a reason, not just aesthetics. now if you can explain why we don't need it, please enlighten me.
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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2WheelMark
    but it's still not a requirement
    Quote Originally Posted by fishcreek
    sorry, i'm just confused. so you run a rear brake but its not a requirement, pretty much contradicting view isn't it. it was there for a reason, not just aesthetics. now if you can explain why we don't need it, please enlighten me.
    i believe the complete quote was "I stand behind my claim, rear brakes on a fixie-MTB is not a necessity. If you are worried about missing work due to crashing therefore want the rear brake thats a personal choice. Also if you live on the side of Everest (or similar local) and you think you need the rear brake than yippy for you, but its still not a requirement.

    the way i read it was in reference to riding a fixed mtb and in that context no, the brake is not necessarily a requirement because one can slow the wheel via leg braking.

    like slocaus pointed out, a lot of the choice to run a rear brake fixed off road depends on one's skill/conditioning. (or lack thereof)
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  39. #39
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    hmm....so what's next?....some pegs so we can rest our feet and coast

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron
    hmm....so what's next?....some pegs so we can rest our feet and coast
    that's what the fork crown is for, can get pretty sketchy, pretty quick, though.

    I've never seen the need for a rear brake on a mtn fix, and I actually think having a rear disc on mtn fix is a bad idea. Will run a rear brake on the road fix though, for when the terrain gets big/more sustained, mostly to share the load and not over cook the front brake. Not really a fan of unclipping, even though the rear brake makes that a more possible option.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomimcmillar
    that's what the fork crown is for, can get pretty sketchy, pretty quick, though.

    I've never seen the need for a rear brake on a mtn fix, and I actually think having a rear disc on mtn fix is a bad idea. Will run a rear brake on the road fix though, for when the terrain gets big/more sustained, mostly to share the load and not over cook the front brake. Not really a fan of unclipping, even though the rear brake makes that a more possible option.

    just stirring the pot a little.....

    lately the speed on my fixed gear rides has been controlled only by my legs

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron
    just stirring the pot a little.....

    lately the speed on my fixed gear rides has been controlled only by my legs
    Exactly, I think I top out at 15mph or so with a 34x16(26"). That's not exactly front and rear 8" hydraulic disc territory. How fast are you folks going without coasting?
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  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by G-reg
    Exactly, I think I top out at 15mph or so with a 34x16(26"). That's not exactly front and rear 8" hydraulic disc territory. How fast are you folks going without coasting?

    i'd guess i'm topping out around 20ish

    55in gear at 120rpm = 19.5mph or 61in gear at 120rpm = 21.9

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by monogod
    in other words, you went to great lengths and detail to make the very point you're arguing against.
    I was neither arguing nor trying to make a point. I said what I said - read into it what you will.
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  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by G-reg
    How fast are you folks going without coasting?
    'Tis not about speed, 'tis about keeping control in long steep technical downhill chunk. For me, ymmv.

    My Garmin has shown my top speed at 21.8 mph on a paved downhill coming home from the trail. That is with a 32x20; that old road race spin is still useful.
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  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by fishcreek
    sorry, i'm just confused. so you run a rear brake but its not a requirement, pretty much contradicting view isn't it. it was there for a reason, not just aesthetics. now if you can explain why we don't need it, please enlighten me.

    Never mind, I have changed my position, I think rear brakes on a fixie are required, and 27 gears, ohh and look at that new shiny automatic adjustible travel fork that anticipates the bumps and adjust automaticly. I don't know how I ever rode these mountain trails without them. And my pop up nav screen with rear view so I dont run over any squirrls when Im backing up on the trail. How ever you look at it; Im on your side on everything you believe in so lets drop this.
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  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron
    hmm....so what's next?....some pegs so we can rest our feet and coast
    Pegs aren't necessary, you can put your feet on the fork crown. On long fire road downhills, it lets you go faster, but I wouldn't do it without a rear brake.

    I also would run a rear brake on my tandem fixie, but I'd prefer a dual disc mount setup to the easily stripped fixie thread.

    But really, training wheels are not necessary either, but a lot of people start with them.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus
    I was neither arguing nor trying to make a point. I said what I said - read into it what you will.
    if you put as much effort into backpedaling on your fixie as just did here you wouldn't need a rear brake on it.
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  49. #49
    Ron
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    Quote Originally Posted by itsdoable
    Pegs aren't necessary, you can put your feet on the fork crown. On long fire road downhills, it lets you go faster, but I wouldn't do it without a rear brake.

    I also would run a rear brake on my tandem fixie, but I'd prefer a dual disc mount setup to the easily stripped fixie thread.

    But really, training wheels are not necessary either, but a lot of people start with them.


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    Dr Gadget is IN
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    Now available. Mine is on order.

    Fixed/Disc w/o adapter issues.
    This isn't a "you're doing it wrong" topic.

    WSS/OSS: Open Source Sealant

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